Archive 2004

 

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Town of Rochester Looking for Photos (12/30/04)

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Fire District Board of Commissioner Election Results (12/30/04)

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Ulster's final budget raises levy 11%, brings back 'bed tax' (12/30/04)

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Feathering his nest proves illegal (12/30/04)

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Update on Minne and Waska, Dogs found in State Park (12/30/04)

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Something to crow about (12/30/04)

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Speakers bash casinos in front of legislators (12/30/04)

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Estate's buildings on block (12/30/04)

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Letters to the Editor & Legal Notices (12/30/04)

 

 

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Grand jury to hear case of missing town money

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Upcoming Hearing on Storage Shed Expansion

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More funds discovered missing in Rochester

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Town Board Criticized by Audience for Board Appointment Procedure

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Police: Stepson assaulted medical examiner

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Injured dog up for adoption

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Historic Preservation Commission Meetings

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Free email accounts for Not-for-Profit Organizations

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Pataki deals for two more casinos in Catskills

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Letter and Legal Notices

 

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Additional $6,000 Missing From Town Clerk’s Office (12/6/04)

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Town Board Adopts 2005 Budget (12/6/04)

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Minnewaska Dogs Available for Adoption (12/6/04)

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Husband, wife charged in assault on cops (12/6/04)

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Natural causes ruled in hunter's death (12/6/04)

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Upcoming Fire District Election (12/6/04)

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City Humor of an Ad Irks Some in Catskills (12/6/04)

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Sotheby's expects to get $65K for first-known piece of printed pornography. (12/6/04)

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Kerhonkson man arrested on charges he deserted U.S. Army (12/6/04)

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Man shot by friend with BB gun suffers collapsed lung (12/6/04)

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Time for every season (12/6/04)

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Letters & Legal Notices (12/6/04)

 

 

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Upcoming Fire District Election (11/25/04)

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Deadline for Zoning Board of Appeals and Planning Board Member Applications Approaching  (11/25/04)

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Body of missing hunter found on stream bank  (11/25/04)

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72,000 Square Foot Self Storage Facility Planned  (11/25/04)

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Restaurateurs share liver after transplant  (11/25/04)

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Minnewaska Dogs Available for Adoption  (11/25/04)

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Accord Local to Star in Film   (11/25/04)

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Legislators want to cut tax increase in Ulster  (11/25/04)

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Ulster County's new jail delayed again  (11/25/04)

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Local Radio Station Features Jail Opening Contest  (11/25/04)

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Letters to the Editor and Legal Notices  (11/25/04)

   

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Town Board Notes (11/25/04)

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Rochester deputy clerk charged in town coffer theft  (11/25/04)

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Kerry Wins in Rochester  (11/25/04)

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Two lost dogs suffer attacks by porcupines at Minnewaska  (11/25/04)

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Ulster jail setbacks intensify scrutiny  (11/25/04)

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Pocketbook pain: Property tax levy up 24% in Ulster County budget (11/25/04)

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More delay seen on new Ulster jail (11/25/04)

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Men indicted on child-rape charges (11/25/04)

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Teen prank prompts extensive search, rescue (11/25/04)

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Legal Notices (11/25/04)

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Letters to the Editor (11/25/04)

 

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No Updates Yet on Money Missing from Town Clerk’s Office (11/25/04)

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Town Clerk’s Office Closes at Lunchtime (11/25/04)

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Planning Board and ZBA minutes now online (11/25/04)

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More Storage Sheds in Rochester (11/25/04)

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Dog trainer finds shelter at Accord pound (11/25/04)

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Judge sets aside $55,000 verdict in Rochester suit (11/25/04)

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K erhonkson Man Sentenced in Child Abuse Case (11/25/04)

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Legal Notices  (11/25/04)

 

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Absentee Ballot Application Deadline Approaching (10/20/04)

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State Auditors Determine that $18,000 is unaccounted for, Referred to District Attorney  (10/20/04)

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Streamside Estates Trailer Park Expansion Fails to win approval – Again  (10/20/04)

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More Storage Sheds in Store for Rochester (10/20/04)

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Accord Fire District to Accept Absentee Balloting in December Election (10/20/04)

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Women's Studio Workshop 30th Anniversary Auction (10/20/04)

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Pedestrians hit by motorcycle (10/20/04)

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Marbletown Tax Reform Tax Force to Meet on Thursday (10/20/04)

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Letters to the Editor and Legal Notices (10/20/04)

 

 

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Rochester Residents Association Newsletter on Taxes and Casinos (9/23/04)

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Voter Registration Deadline is Fast Approaching (9/23/04)

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Absentee Ballot Application Forms Available Online (10/4/04)

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Kerhonkson Artist to show work (10/4/04)

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Ulster man charged with growing pot (10/4/04)

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Legal Notices (10/4/04)

 

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Stone House Day offers tours of Stone Houses  on October 2  (9/23/04)

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Planning Board Rejects Streamside Estates Trailer Park Expansion (9/23/04)

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Final Farewell at Schrade Sale (9/23/04)

 
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Local Election Results (9/19/04)

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Friends of Historic Rochester Annual Meeting on September 17 (9/19/04)

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Smart Bells Classes (9/19/04)

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Kerhonkson/Accord Chamber of Commerce Events (9/19/04)

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Friends of Little Ones Library to Host Truck Day on Sept. 18 (9/19/04)

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Legal Notices (9/19/04)

  

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School Tax Rates Announced  (8/30/04)

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Local Artist Sara Harris to Exhibit Works  (8/30/04)

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Woman's screams draw help; attackers run off  (8/30/04)

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Tanker tragedy averted  (8/30/04)

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From steeple to the ground, church gets new coat of paint  (8/30/04)

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Rondout Board of Education fills seat vacated in June  (8/30/04)

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Letters and Legal Notices  (8/30/04)

 

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Planning Board Accusations (8/5/04)

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Bottles Shatter Truckers’ Windows (8/5/04)

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S chrade shuts, 260 lose jobs (8/5/04)

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Police seek suspect in dog shooting (8/5/04)

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State cites little league over pesticides  (8/5/04)

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Spraying will cost league (8/5/04)

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Roller Rink Plan up for Discussion (8/5/04)

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Letters to the Editor & Legal Notices (8/5/04)

 

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Streamside Estates Public Hearing (7/19/04)

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An Appeal for Little Ones’ Library  (7/19/04)

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Two Men Die in Vehicle Accidents  (7/19/04)

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Police say man set up guest to be robbed  (7/19/04)

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Resignation leaves school board vacancy  (7/19/04)

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Ulster County facing severe budget crunch  (7/19/04)

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Marbletown leaders proposed development moratorium  (7/19/04)

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Letters to the Editor  (7/19/04)

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Legal Notices  (7/19/04)

 

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Extended Hours for Town Clerk’s Office (7/6/04)

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Little Ones Library Funding Curtailed (7/6/04)

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Funeral Services for Franklin Kelder (7/6/04)

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Major “Streamside” Decisions made by Rochester Planning Board (7/6/04)

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Volunteers Needed for Rochester Food Pantry (7/6/04)

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Love and money help ailing girl and her family (7/6/04)

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Peg Leg Bates (7/6/04)

 

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Imagine Rochester a Huge Success (6/3/04)

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Rondout Valley School Budget Passes (6/3/04)

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Animal Abuse Case in Rochester (6/3/04)

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Ulster County Jail Overbudget (6/3/04

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Bank Robbery in Ellenville (6/3/04)

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Legal Notices (6/3/04)

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Letters to the Editor (6/3/04)

 

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Friends of Historic Rochester History Day  (5/10/04)

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Starved Dog Struggles to Survive (5/10/04)

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Candidate Statements for Rondout School Board  (5/10/04)

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Legals (5/10/04)

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An Open Invitation from the Supervisor and Town Board – Imagine Rochester (5/5/04)

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Friends of Historic Rochester History Day on Saturday, May 8th (5/5/04)

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School Board and Budget Vote Absentee Ballot Applications Available (5/5/04)

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Rondout Expects School Tax Jump (5/5/04)

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School Budget Session is Quiet (5/5/04)

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Stone Ridge Woman Killed in Accident (5/5/04)

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Ulster County Community College Tuition to Increase (5/5/04)

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You want the Truth? (5/5/04)

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Two Women Face Assault Charges (5/5/04)

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Jail Completion Date Pushed Back Again (5/5/04)

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Poughkeepsie Journal Editoral: Change Ulster County Government (5/5/04)

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Letters to the Editor (5/5/04)

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Environmental Notice Bulletin: Mombaccus Proposed Mining Expansion and legal notices (5/5/04)

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Rochester Residents Association to Host Meeting on April 25th  (4/20/04)

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Rochester Supervisor Wants Input from Town Residents  (4/20/04)

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Earth Day Roadside Clean up Scheduled for April 24th  (4/20/04)

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Friends of Historic Rochester History Day to Take Place on May 8th  (4/20/04)

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Rondout School Board Candidates Announced  (4/20/04)

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Absentee Ballot Applications for School Budget and Board Vote Available  (4/20/04)

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Volunteers Needed for Rochester Food Pantry  (4/20/04)

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Little Ones Library Means a Lot  (4/20/04)

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Wawarsing Crash Kills New Jersey Couple  (4/20/04)

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Residents hopeful crash spurs action  (4/20/04)

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Accord Speedway Gears up for Opener  (4/20/04)

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Legal Notices  (4/20/04)

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Letters to the Editor (4/20/04)

 

 

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“Imagine Rochester” Program Launched (4/5/2004)

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Chamber of Commerce to Honor Max Finestone and Harold Lipton (4/5/2004)

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Man Allegedly Attacked by Town Employees wins $55,000 in civil suit (4/5/2004)

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Rochester Mobile Home Park Public Hearing Continued by Planning Board (4/5/2004)

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Accord Speedway Race Schedule Approved (4/5/2004)

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Ulster County Tax Sale April 22nd (4/5/2004)

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Transitions (4/5/2004)

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Vigil Held to Mark 8th Anniversary of Disappearance (4/5/2004)

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Rochester Student Injured in Schoolyard Assault (4/5/2004)

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Town Democratic Presidential Primary Results (4/5/2004)

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Legal Notice regarding School District Budget Vote and Board Elections (4/5/2004)

 

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Planning Board, Zoning Board of Appeals and Board of Assessment Review Members Failed to Take Oath (3/23/04)

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Update on Race Track(3/23/04)

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Brush Burning Toasts Building Too (3/23/04)

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Alligerville Fire Company Back in Business (3/23/04)

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Prosecutors Pursuing Cruelty Case (3/23/04)

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Two Local Authors Publish Books (3/23/04)

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Legal Notices (3/23/04)

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Local Filmmaker wins first Oscar (3/15/04)

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Twin Track Promotions, Inc. Dissolved  (3/15/04)

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Streamside Estates Public Hearing  (3/15/04)

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Community Fundraiser for Resident's Medical Expenses  (3/15/04)

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Man dies in High Falls house fire; wife escapes  (3/15/04)

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Legal notices  (3/15/04)

 

 

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Town Board Highlights (2/8/04)

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Family Looks for Men Who Found Dog (2/8/04)

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30 Day Notice for Agricultural Districts (2/8/04)

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Fundraiser for Dennis Kucinich (2/8/04)

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Absentee Ballots for March 2 Democratic Primary Election (2/8/04)

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Legal Notices (2/8/04)

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Town Board Adopts Adult Entertainment Zone (1/19/04)

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New Town Board Takes Office - Organizational Meeting Summary  (1/19/04)

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Town Board Meeting Summary  (1/19/04)

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Kerhonkson Accord First Aid Squad Announces Officers  (1/19/04)

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Local Shelter Featured in HBO Documentary to Air January 27th  (1/19/04)

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Sundance Award Nominee Filmed Locally  (1/19/04)

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Legal Notices  (1/19/04)

 

 

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Town of Rochester Looking for Photos

The Town of Rochester is looking for some representative photos of the Town of Rochester to include in its new official website.  If you would like to submit photos for consideration, please email them to:  AccordTownCrier@aol.com and we will forward them to the town.  By submitting any photographs, you consent to the publication of such photographs.  

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Results of Accord Fire District Board of Fire Commissioner December 14, 2004 Election

Incumbent Fire Commissioner Fred Wustrau was re-elected to a five-year term.

 

Fred Wustrau   120 votes

John Dunning     70 votes

Joe Bauer            1 vote (write in)

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Ulster's final budget raises levy 11%, brings back 'bed tax'

By Hallie Arnold, Freeman staff

12/15/2004

 

KINGSTON - Ulster County lawmakers have narrowly approved a 2005 budget that raises the county property tax levy by 11.02 percent and reinstates a tax on hotel and motel rooms.

Property tax rates to fund the spending plan vary widely by municipality, ranging from an increase of more than 91 percent in Olive to a decrease of nearly 44 percent in Woodstock. Countywide, five municipalities will see their county taxes drop next year, while the remaining 16 can expect their county tax bills to rise.

The fluctuation is due primarily to three factors: a countywide jump in property values, townwide reassessments that changed each municipality's share of the tax burden and the county's adoption of the state's so-called "large parcel law," which allowed New York City reservoir properties to be taxed at a separate rate and caused a huge jump in the tax burden for Olive, which has the biggest share of reservoir property.

The $293.1 million budget was adopted late Monday night at a meeting that lasted nearly five hours. The resulting tax levy increase was less than half the nearly 24 percent increase projected in a tentative budget proposed by the County Administrator's Office in late October.

After hours of deliberations, both in recent weeks during the Ways and Means Committee's review of the budget, and again Monday, the budget was adopted by a vote of 19-14, just two votes more than the 17 required for passage.

All 17 majority Republicans on the Legislature voted in favor of the spending plan, while just two Democrats - Jeanette Provenzano of Kingston and Joan Feldmann of Saugerties - voted for it.

Lawmakers voted to enact a 2 percent hotel/motel tax, commonly referred to as the "bed tax," in an effort to reduce the property tax levy increase from 12.8 percent, where it stood at the outset of Monday's meeting.

According to the County Administrator's Office, a law enacted in September 1991 allows the county Legislature to reinstate the "bed tax," which the county levied on hotel and motel stays from 1991-93, without additional approval from state lawmakers.

The state Legislature's approval is usually required for a county government to institute a new tax, such as a mortgage tax, or to increase the county share of the sales tax.

What will take state approval is the county's plan to increase the hotel/motel tax to a flat $5-a-night surcharge at the midpoint of the year. The surcharge is expected to generate about $2.4 million next year.

Lawmakers had been debating numerous budget items up until the vote was taken Monday, including the flex plan, a management benefit that many Democrats have targeted for months to cut; the institution of a mortgage tax and/or a hotel/motel tax; and the issue of employees who had desk audits suggesting promotions that were denied during the budget process.

Ultimately, the only changes that were adopted prior to the budget vote were the hotel/motel tax and the reinstatement of $30,000 out of $105,552 that previously was cut from the county Health Department's tobacco education mini-grant program.

County taxes make up about 12.4 percent of the average property tax bill in Ulster County. At roughly 68 percent, school taxes are the largest portion of local taxes, while municipal taxes account for about 13.89 percent. Special district taxes, generally for fire, water or library districts, are about 5.45 percent of the average tax bill.  (Freeman 12/15/04)

 

 

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Feathering his nest proves illegal

By Paul Brooks
Times Herald-Record
pbrooks@th-record.com

Kerhonkson – John Iorio is an out-of work, ex-Schrade guy who lives with his girlfriend, Sue, in a little house on Route 44/55.
He never thought the federal government would spoil his Christmas because he wanted to raise a little money for presents by selling a hummingbird nest on eBay. He was wrong.
It started as a lark. He spotted a guy selling nothing, literally, on eBay. Before the joke ended, the bidding soared to $18,000, Iorio said. An idea took flight.
Why not him? Christmas was coming. Money was tight.
From a cardboard box, he pulled a hollow pouch of gossamer thread and fibers dangling from a twig. This was his nest egg in disguise.
Three years ago, a Central Hudson utility crew had sliced out pieces of the four pine trees in his front yard. The nest tumbled to the ground. Two tiny eggs within shattered.
Iorio said he figured it had to be the nest of the hummingbirds that frequent his front yard. Brilliant flashes of red mark their flittings from summer flower to feeder and into the sheltering branches of the pines.
When he complained to environmental officials back then about the damage the utility crews had done to the nest, nothing happened, he said.
He took the nest inside and kept it until he got the idea to place it for sale on eBay.
"I don't really want to part with it, but times are tough right now. [I'm unemployed at the moment]," he wrote in the description to the listing. "I just hope someone else can get all the enjoyment like we do from looking at it."
The bidding was slow at first. But by Friday it climbed to more than $200. The closing high bid on Saturday was $330, more than enough to buy his girlfriend a present he had in mind.
But Iorio, 47, and Sue got different e-mails, too. One writer said the sale was illegal and threatened to turn Iorio in. He did.
"The sale or offer for sale of this nest is a violation of federal law," Robert Garabedian, a special agent with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Albany, wrote to Iorio.
It's illegal to even take a feather of a covered migratory bird if it is lying on the ground in the woods. The same is true of dead owls, hawks or eagles.
"You can't do that," Garabedian said yesterday. "You have to have a permit."
The maximum penalty is up to six months in prison and a $5,000 fine, he said.
Iorio spoke with Garabedian by telephone yesterday. "I told him I ain't going to argue with you. If it's against the law, it's against the law."
Iorio said he plans to donate the nest to a Pennsylvania state park near where the winning bidder lives. The law allows that.
Ironically, two experts told Iorio the nest may not be that of a hummingbird after all. With his luck, though, it would turn out to be some other restricted bird, he said.
In the meantime, he has no money for Sue's present. "I don't know how, but I will pay for it," he said. "It will come from somewhere." (TH-Record 12/21/04)

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Update on Minne and Waska, Dogs found in State Park

Waska has been adopted by a woman from Pallenville NY.  She also went to the SPCA where Minna is going through heartworm treatment. They met and she fell in love with her too. She will also be adopting her in two weeks when she is well enough to go. Minna and Waska will be

together again, as they belong. Thanks, Jill Shufelt, Dog Control Officer.

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 Something to crow about

By: Bonnie Langston, Freeman staff

12/17/2004

 

When Jordan Gundberg talks about the poultry flock he is raising at his home in Accord, the word he most often uses is "cool."

It was definitely cool, for instance, when the teenager's New Hamphire Red rooster Chomper won not only Best of Breed but also grand champion over all breeds of poultry - including ducks geese and you name it - at the New York State Fair in Syracuse this past summer.

And it was cool when, at the same fair, Gundberg won Best of Class for showmanship with his buff orpington rooster Champ, who also was named Best of Breed.

If that were not enough, Gundberg also placed high enough at the state level to compete with other 4-H members at the Avian Bowl in Louisville this past November.

"New York came in fifth out of the whole nation," 15-year-old Gundberg said.

As he talked about his chickens in the kitchen of his home, Gundberg's parents Wayne and Debbie and his grandmother, Jane Countryman - once a 4-Her herself and a past 4-H leader - listened in with a pride that matched Gundberg's. A few rows of eggs in various shades of brown lay on a nearby cabinet in the room that looks out onto a barn, sugar shack and open countryside acres.

Despite the obvious - that Gundberg has a special niche and winning ways with feathered fowl - he has not taken years to develop it - or at least not many. The idea took hold about three years ago when he and his family moved to their present location. Fewer than six months later, a friend who was no longer able to raise his dozen chicks gave them to Gundberg.

It was a later trip to a county fair and a visit to an exhibit of 4-H poultry that convinced the teenager to join the local club Samsonville Barnyard and show his own chickens.

He thought his poultry had a chance to place well.

And sure enough, it did.

His New Hampshire hen won Best Overall in the poultry division, and in the trio class he showed Chomper and two New Hampshire hens that won a blue ribbon. In addition, he won the novice division in showmanship with Champ.

"This one's like a baby. You can pet him," Gundberg said, lifting Champ out of his cage and demonstrating that fact. "He's so calm."

But how did Gundberg win the overall championship at the state fair, especially his first year in showing poultry? He said he discovered early in the chicken-raising process that his poultry looked their best at 6-months-old. So in March Gundberg ordered a dozen commercially-bred, day-old chicks from Missouri and chose the finest to show, including Chomper and Champ. The calm Champ was an asset to Gundberg's effort at showmanship. And Chomper? He excelled in standards for his breed such as color, comb points, body shape and weight.

The rest, as they say, is history.

What do Gundberg's pals think about their friend's poultry endeavors?

"They think it's pretty cool," he said.

And his brothers, 30-year-old Jeremy of Kerhonkson and 26-year-old Jared of Accord, sometimes tease him calling him "chicken-boy," but they've also been known to brag to others about their younger brother's accomplishments.

Gundberg said he likes the fact that his hens provide eggs for the family and others. Typically egg production equals two-thirds the number of laying chickens, he said. Therefore his 36 hens should lay 24 eggs daily, but they have performed exceptionally providing about 30 until they began to molt, the yearly growing of new feathers that replace the old.

And, unfortunately for the Cornish crosses, a fast-growing breed that Gundberg raises in the spring for consumption, Gundberg has a palate for chicken. Gundberg, his father, brothers and uncle butcher the chickens when they are 10 weeks old. The dressed birds sell by word-of-mouth, as do eggs from the laying hens.

Gundberg's mother, unit coordinator on the surgical floor at Kingston Hospital, said she has plenty of customers at work.

"The doctors and nurses, they get my eggs," Jordan Gundberg said.

Among the most uncool things about raising chickens, he said, is cleaning their coop, especially in spring after a winter that typically is too cold to allow the chickens out and people in.

"In the spring it's quite messy," Gundberg said. "Cleaning the coops is not too much fun."

Besides his prize-winners, he also raises Rhode Island Reds, Black Stars - and Araucanas.

"That lays a green egg. That's a cool chicken," Gundberg said of a black hen with poofy feathers tinged with silver highlights that make is look like it's wearing a short boa scarf.

There is also a grouping of guinea hens that are so vehemently loud that their wattles - the bright fleshy skin that hangs from their throats - waggle along with their tongues. These birds, kept by some farmers as sort of "watch dogs" that warn when varmints come near the coop, also eat insects, including ticks.

Gundberg showed a pair of the birds through Cornell Cooperative of Ulster County to young children at summer school this year.

"The kids loved them, too," Gundberg said. "The one guinea laid an egg while I was there."

He also has given more public educational presentations, and for the second year joined other 4-H members in providing holiday foods and goodies last Saturday for the elderly in New Paltz.

"We bring eggs, too," Gundberg said.

As for next year, he plans to breed his champions and show their offspring at the Ulster County Fair. He will enter the senior class for showmanship with a goal of competing on the state level in master showmanship, which includes not only poultry but dogs, cows, rabbits and other animals shown at the fair.

Gundberg also is raising a pair of silver fawn rabbits and plans to enter their progeny in the county fair as well.

Meanwhile, Chomper makes sure everyone knows that he remains king of the roost at the Gundberg residence, letting out cock-a-doodle-doos that challenge the clear-singing Chanticleer in Geoffrey Chaucer's "Canterbury Tales."

But don't pat him for his efforts.

"His name is Chomper for a reason," Gundberg's father said. (Freeman 12/17/04)

 

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Speakers bash casinos in front of legislators
By Victor Whitman
Times Herald-Record

Monticello – Casinos?
We don't want them.
That was the message speaker after speaker delivered to the Sullivan County Legislature yesterday as more than 100 people showed up at the regular meeting – most to trash casinos.
Folks from Ulster and Orange counties also came to raise fears about gambling addiction, overcrowded roads and the evils of gaming.
Not everyone was against casinos, though.
Of about 25 speakers, three touted the new jobs and billions in investment casinos would bring – comments that were largely met with hisses and boos.
But with Gov. George Pataki pushing hard for five casinos in the Catskills, does more than two hours of mostly anti-casino talk matter?
Lawmakers have already signed agreements to support the Stockbridge-Munsee Band of Mohicans' planned casino in Bridgeville and a St. Regis Mohawk casino at Kutsher's Sports Academy in the Town of Thompson.
And they've already signed a memorandum of understanding with Empire Resorts to support two casinos at the Monticello Raceway and the Concord.
Steve Bachop, co-chairman of Casino Free Sullivan, says the casino train can be stopped.
"I don't see anything as final until it happens," he said.
So that means more ads and more protests are on the horizon, he said.
Chairman Chris Cunningham said the lawmakers' position remains the same – they'll still support only three casinos in Sullivan, and that'll be true even if they have agreements with four tribes.
"It's been discussed and discussed and discussed for years," he said. "I don't think people have paid enough attention to it until recently."
But Joan Thursh of Woodbourne said, "If they have made this decision, come out and defend it in front of the people." (TH-Record 12/17/04)

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Estate's buildings on block
By Deborah Medenbach
Times Herald-Record
dmedenbach@th-record.com
Napanoch – It's one of the top 10 most expensive parcels on the Sotheby's International Realty associates site.
The listing features a classic mansion with rolling lawns trailing down to a stocked lake. The exclusive 632-acre estate known as Lyons Lodge is priced at $5.9 million and is surrounded by a wilderness preserve. A second listing further down the price scale shows the $1.5 million Moore House estate, comprising another 62 acres with stone manse, numerous barns, kennels and outbuildings.
Neither listing uses the buzzword that would draw the attention of the locals.
After four years in private ownership, the Lundy Estate buildings are back on the block.
The 5,405-acre parcel was purchased in 2000 by the Open Space Institute to protect more than six miles of the Vernooy Kill and preserve the accompanying wilderness from development. The majority of the land was later sold to the state for $5 million to be folded into Catskill Park.
The buildings and surrounding acreage were sold to Douglas Eger and his wife, Cristina Khuly, who had great dreams for the property when they first moved in.
The couple spent the first two years assessing renovation needs at the Moore House buildings and working diligently on restorations at Lyons Lodge.
After two more years, Lyons Lodge is complete and Moore House and its accompanying buildings have been stabilized.
The couple are now ready to move on to other preservation projects.
"We're in a time period where there will be more development pressure in the area. If there's more special property up here that we can work with, we'd love to do it again and again," Douglas Eger said.
"No matter what, you're not going to see 600 split-level ranches up on the mountain. OSI puts conservation restrictions on any property we sell," said Tally Blumberg of the Open Space Institute.
OSI counsel Bob Anderberg explained. "There are serious conservation easements on both properties. Basically, people coming along 100 years from now will see it pretty much as it is now," Anderberg said. "It's a real success story. The DEC pays full taxes on the land transferred to it, and the private owners pay taxes on their land and buildings, too. The land is protected. Everyone wins."

History of the Lundy Estate

1911 – Dr. William Woodend buys 1,500 acres along the Vernooy Kill from the Terwilliger brothers and begins construction of a stone manse, airstrip, kennels, stables and other outbuildings that comprise the core of the estate.
1917 – Woodend sells the property to Edith Crawford Moore, who renames it Tunessa Lodge and lives there until 1929.
1929 – Brooklyn restaurateur F.W. Lundy purchases Moore's property and begins acquiring other contiguous parcels, eventually increasing his holdings to 5,405 acres.
1964 – Lundy purchases Lyons Lodge, an elegant estate with lake frontage that borderes his property.
1977 – Lundy dies in September. The estate is threatened with conflicting claims until his sole heir is located, 50s pop singer Teresa Brewer. The land goes to one of Lundy's employees and eventually is lost in a bankruptcy sale.
1980s – Parc Europe is proposed by French investors for the Lundy Estate. The theme park would recreate 17th and 18th century European villages. The project faces opposition and is eventually dropped.
2000 – The 5,405-acre estate is purchased by the Open Space Institute. OSI is interested in preservation of the land, but not management of the substantial buildings and barns. The buildings and acreage surrounding the Lyons Lodge and Moore House complexes are sold with conservation easements to Douglas Eger and Cristina Khuly for an undisclosed sum. The remainder is transferred to the state for $5 million, to be added to Catskill Park.
Dec. 16, 2004 – Both the Lyons Lodge, with the original 400 acres and 232 additional protected acres, and Moore House estates, with its 62 acres, appear on a Sotheby's International Realty associates Web site. (TH-Record 12/17/04)

 

 

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Letters to the Editor & Legal Notices

 

Dear Editor:

 

I agree with many of the statements of recent letter writers on the Polar Express issue.  Perhaps it should be the Polarizing Express.  My first question is why is public taxpayer money being used to pay for trips to the movies?  Money should be spent on teaching kids to read and write, not on entertainment.

            Secondly, Santa Claus is a representation of Christmas.  And Christmas is a Christian holiday.  You can argue all you want that Santa is secular, but he’s a representation of a Christian celebration nonetheless.  People of faiths other than Christianity don’t expect Santa to visit nor do they seek him out.  His very origins (the Dutch Sint Klaas) indicate Christian sainthood, not secular symbolism.

            The first amendment to the Constitution states: “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof... ”  I’m a Christian and I fully believe in this principle as well as everyone’s right to observe their own religious beliefs (or choose not to have any).  However, public funds should not be spent on anything that emphasizes any single religion over any other, which a visit to a Santa Claus movie does.

            Kids have a difficult enough time trying not to stand out and to avoid the oftentimes cruel ridicule of their peers.  Wearing the wrong shoes, looking or acting differently, not having the money to follow the latest trends, as well as being smarter or dumber than their peers are all sources of schoolyard humiliation that detracts from the mission of a school system.  Why would the school district want to add religious beliefs and personal faith to the mix?

               

JR

Kerhonkson

 

 

 

Dear Editor:

 

     I find it very sad indeed that people consider the "Polar Express" to have any religious significance in regard to Christmas.  Santa is a symbol of generosity and gift giving, but it is in no way a religious symbol.  Santa is make believe.  He has become a secular symbol used by commercial vendors to entice people to spend money on buying their goods.  The only good in Santa is the magic he brings to the hearts of  young innocent children who "believe" if only for a short time.  Thus the reminder of this in "Polar Express"  makes it a nice film for children to see at this time of the year.

     But the RELIGIOUS significance of Christmas is that it is the birthday of Jesus Christ and everyone seems to have forgotten that very important fact.  In fact, we are asked not to mention that information because it makes others uncomfortable.  What happened to religious freedom in this country?

     As far as the "grinch" statement, I thought people had a sense of humor in Kerhonkson, as that was how it was written.

            DM , Kerhonkson

 

 

Dear Editor.

 

This is addressed to those who can't stand to be criticized when they criticize other's faith practices.   Vitriol can imply many things, for instance it could serve to notify those whinny do-gooders to pause in their feeble attempts to rearrange the status quo. And they should expect mean spirit If they're foolish enough to try and stop a holiday that more then 80% of the American population celebrate.

 

Christmas to many is just a fat guy with big wallet and kind heart, a generic pagan holiday of gifts and take.  It was created by a Scandinavian society to dilute and absorb the faith of Christians who had been worshiping Christ's birth.  To many Xmas is a time to feel depressed and others pay no attention to it at all.  Those who want to banish this pagan holiday will adversely clear the way to open the door wider onto Christ.

 

The Romans also attempted to weaken the Christian faith by taking the important moment of Christ's death and tried changing it into a pagan celebration called Easter.   Hence the non-Christian fertility eggs and the multiplying rabbits of procreation.  Out of the churches and into beds was the Roman idea of control. To them there was no God but Caesar; as many

today continue to believe.

 

I would say Christians are generous in their nature, they've already allowed our society to truncate their values and turn their worship into public holidays of fun and simplicity.  I've also noticed that people who believe in one God are usually tolerant of another's God.  So I would

suggest that if neither the pagan nor the Christian, nor the Jewish, or Islamic faith suit the complainers' needs then they should invent one like Kwanzaa.  For example; on December 25th initiate the Enlightened Atheists of the Amebic Church of Nothingness.

 

Then we could shout; Merry Christmas, Happy Holidays, and Cheerful Nothing!

 

 

Bill Dukas

Kerhonkson NY

 

 

 

Legal Notice BIDS FOR AERIAL LADDER The Board of Fire Commissioners of the Accord Fire District, Accord, N.Y. will receive sealed bids for the purchase of a 2004 Aerial/Pumper Quint, Aerial of 75 ft., minimum tip load 1000 pounds, pumper capacity of 1500 gpm, tank load of minimum 400 gallons. Bids on such items will be submitted in sealed envelopes to the Accord Fire District, Lon Kazmarick, Secretary, P.O. Box 163, Accord, N.Y. 12404 or hand delivered prior to January 19, 2004, by 7:30 p.m. Each bid shall bear the face thereof, the name and address of the bidder and must also designate "Bid for 2004 Aerial Ladder." All will be publicly read aloud at the regular meeting of the Board of Fire Commissioners of the Accord Fire District on January 19, 2004 at 7:30 p.m. The meeting will be held at the Accord Fire House, Main Street, Accord, N.Y. Specifications, at a cost of $50.00 to the bidder, may be obtained by calling or writing to Lori Kazmarick, Secretary, at the above addressed or calling 845-626-3707 between the hours of 1-4 p.m., Mondays. Bidders must comply with the laws of the State of New York and (Non-Conclusive Bid Certificate) is required by Section 1030 of the General Municipal Law, must be submitted with each bid. The successful bidder may be required to furnish and pay for a satisfactory performance bond. The Board of Fire Commissioners reserves the right to consider bids for a period of Forty-Five days after their opening during which time no bidder may withdraw his bid and the right is reserved to the Board of Fire Commissioners to accept or reject any and all bids or to accept the bid which is best in the interest of the District. Dated: 12/24/2004 Board of Fire Commissioners Lon Kazmarick District Secretary (Freeman 12/25/04)

 

 

 

December 22, 2004

 

Pam Duke, Supervisor,

Town of Rochester

Post Office Box 65

Accord, NY 12404

 

Nadine Carney, Chair

Town of Rochester Planning Board

Post Office Box 65

Accord, NY 12404

 

 

                Re:                Alternate Members to Planning Board & Zoning Board of Appeals

                                Chapter 38, Code of the Town of Rochester

 

Dear Supervisor Duke and Ms. Carney:

 

In reviewing the videotape of the December 21, 2004 meeting of the Town of Rochester Planning Board, I was surprised by Ms. Carney’s public assertion that the alternate member of the Planning Board is permitted to participate in meeting of that body when all regular members are present, provided that the alternate member does not make motions or vote.  Ms. Carney’s interpretation of the law appears to directly contradict the provisions of Chapter 38 of the Code of the Town of Rochester, that provides for the establishment of such alternate positions and which defines the conditions under which such alternates may act, as follows:

 

1.                    Chapter 38-2 clearly states that the purpose of appointment of an alternate member is to ensure that a quorum is present in cases that include, but are not necessarily limited to: members’ illness, extended vacation, or conflicts of interest.  This “Declaration of Policy” clearly states that “the use of alternate members in such instances[1] is hereby authorized pursuant to the provisions of this chapter.”

 

The alternate member is only authorized under the Code to participate in the absence or non-participation of a full member.

 

2.                    Chapter 38-3 defines Alternate Member as “an individual appointed by the Town Board to serve on the Town’s Planning Board or Zoning Board of Appeals when a regular member is absent or unable to participate on an application or matter before the respective Board as provided herein.”

 

As all regular members of the Planning Board were present on December 21, 2004, the participation by the alternate member in the meeting was unauthorized and, therefore, unlawful.

 

3.                    Chapter 38-4(A) states that “the alternate member would serve when regular members are absent or unable to participate on an application or matter before the respective Board.”

 

As all regular members of the Planning Board were present on December 21, 2004, the participation by the alternate member in the meeting was unauthorized by Chapter 38 or any other statute and was, therefore, unlawful.

 

4.                    Chapter 38-4 (D) states that “The Chairperson ... may designate the alternate member to substitute for a regular member for any application, matter or period of time such member is absent or unable to participate on an application or matter before the Board.  When so designated [and only when so designated], the alternate members shall possess all powers of a regular member of the Board.

 

All regular members were present and participating in the December 21, 2004 Planning Board meeting.  The Vice Chair recused himself for a short portion of the meeting, however, it does not appear that the Chair publicly designated the alternate member to participate as required by law (which would have applied only to the portion of the meeting during which the Vice Chair recused himself).

 

Participation includes asking questions, leading and directing discussions, making motions, voting and taking any other action that is not available to members of the general public audience.  Unless the alternate member has been openly and officially designated by the Planning Board Chair to substitute for an absent or non-participating regular member, the Planning Board alternate has no legal authority or right to participate in any meeting other than those rights normally given to members of the general public.  The authority of law is quite specific and the powers of quasi-judicial bodies such as the Planning Board (and its members, including alternates) are limited to those enumerated by statute.  As the alternate member was not acting as a substitute for a regular member as appointed by the Chair, his participation in the discussion was unlawful to the extent that members of the general public were not also permitted to participate.

 

 

 

Ms. Carney’s assertions related to the participation in the meeting by the Planning Board alternate member were contrary to what the statute establishing and authorizing the alternate member position actually states.  It is clear from statute that the Planning Board alternate is not authorized to participate in a meeting unless a regular member is absent or otherwise unable to participate and the Chair has specifically designated the alternate to participate (this also means that even if a regular member is absent or unable to participate, the alternate member is not authorized to participate unless specifically designated by the Chair).

 

As the participation in a meeting by the alternate member is unlawful unless the specific conditions of Chapter 38 have been met, I respectfully ask you to immediately cease and desist from permitting the alternate member to participate unless the specific conditions of law have been met.

 

Sincerely,

 

 

 

Z. Win

President

 

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Upcoming Hearing on Rental Storage Shed Expansion

The Planning Board will conduct a public hearing for a special use permit for two additional budilgins (40x120’ each) to the existing storage facility owned by RV Associates (owned by Planning Board Vice Chair Shane Ricks).  The hearing will be on Tuesday, December 21 at 7pm at the Town Hall in Accord.   If you are unable to attend in person, you may send a letter to Planning Board, PO Box 65, Accord, NY 12404.

 

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December 09, 2004
Grand jury to hear case of missing town money
By Paul Brooks
Times Herald-Record
New Paltz – An Ulster County grand jury will begin hearing evidence this morning about money missing from the Town of Rochester clerk's office.
The amount of money missing has jumped by $6,000 to $24,000.
So far, Deputy Town Clerk Annette Rose has been charged with grand larceny and falsifying business records in the case.
State police are continuing their investigation into the missing money. Ulster County District Attorney Don Williams did not rule out charges against others.
"The grand jury will have the opportunity to explore all the facts and any other wrongdoing," he said.
Rose, 37, of Queens Highway, could not be reached for comment yesterday.
The charges stem from an audit by state Comptroller Alan Hevesi's office. Auditors found $18,000 of town landfill money was missing. The audit covered the period of Jan. 1 through Aug. 26, 2003.
Town officials got word of the missing money in March at the end of the audit, but did not get the full report until October. The report spread the blame around.
The town clerk failed to properly track financial activity, the report said. Town Clerk Veronica Sommer declined comment yesterday.
The Town Board failed to have an annual audit done of the town clerk's financial records or pinpoint problems with the clerk's financial system, according to auditors.
With the report in hand, Supervisor Pam Duke and the Town Board hired the Albany accounting firm of Bollam Sheedy Torani and Co. to review town policies and recommend improvements.
But the review also uncovered an additional $6,000 that is unaccounted for. That money disappeared in October somewhere between the town clerk's office and the bank, Duke said yesterday. Again, it was money from the town's trash transfer station.
"It's a mystery to all of us why this money was never deposited in the town clerk's bank account," Duke said.
But it will be taken care of, she said.
The Albany firm has recommended ways for the town to tighten its controls, basically separating functions in the town clerk's office, Duke said.
"We are fiscally responsible for the town," Duke said. "This has opened the door for us to go in and say, 'You've got to do something.'"
Sommer has been very cooperative with the Town Board, the supervisor added. (TH Record 12/9/04)

 

[The grand jury met for the first time on these charges on December 9, 2004.  In an interview with the AccordTownCrier on December 6, 2004, Ulster County District Attorney Williams discussed the grand jury process and indicated that he “seriously doubted” that the grand jury investigation would be completed in one day and indicated that charges could be expanded to include official misconduct as the matter related to public officials.  When asked to confirm a widespread rumor that two Republican Town Councilmen contacted him or his office about the case, Mr. Williams said that he did not recall speaking to [those individuals] but said that it is possible that “they may have spoken to me or people in my office.”]

 

The AccordTownCrier obtained the independent auditor’s report of the Town Clerk’s Office revenue procedures dated November 22, 2004 under the NYS Freedom of Information Law.  This reported stated:   

 

                “During our review, we found a number of material weaknesses where procedures in the Town Clerk’s Office were deficient when compared with recommended internal control practices.”

The Town Clerk’s bank account was not reconciled at 10/31/04

                “The Town Clerk did not reconcile assets to liabilities for any of the months under review” [August 2004 to October 2004].

                “The cash transactions for the months of August and October [2004] were not recorded in the cash receipts book until the tenth and twelfth day of the month, respectively, while deposits were recorded at least a week earlier.

                “Three times during October deposit slips were made out and the transactions were recorded in the cash receipts book but no deposits could be found on the bank statement.  Apparently, these funds have never reached the bank” [this is the missing $6,000].

 

The poor cash management and accounting procedures would have made it more difficult to identify missing and/or stolen funds in a timely manner.

 

 

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More funds discovered missing in Rochester

12/08/2004

ROCHESTER - Some $6,000 of town funds is missing, said town supervisor Pamela Duke, in addition to the $18,000 shortfall uncovered in October.

The additional shortage was found during an audit of the town's funds conducted by the accounting firm of Bollam, Sheedy, Toraini & Co. of Albany, Duke said. She said the purpose of the most recent audit was to assess the town's accounting procedures and recommend improvements for handling of the town's monies. A report by The New York State Comptroller's office said an audit performed in October found "serious weaknesses in the internal control structure as it relates to moneys collected in the town clerk's office."

All the missing funds are connected with the town's transfer station, said Duke, with deposit slips having been prepared but the money never reaching the bank. The state comptroller's October report indicated transfer station revenues noted on the town clerk's monthly reports did not agree with revenues recorded on the transfer station monthly reports.

Felony charges of falsifying business records and grand larceny were filed in November against Deputy Town Clerk Annette M. Rose, 37, of, Accord, in connection with the earlier audit, Duke said.  (Freeman 12/8/04)

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Town Board Criticized by Audience for Board Appointment Procedure

Residents voiced their dissatisfaction with the Rochester Town Board for the procedure it used in reappointing members to the Town’s Planning Board on December 2.  The vocal audience in the public comment period stated that the Town Board’s decision not to interview applicants for the board openings was undemocratic, short-sighted, and not consistent with the Town Board’s practice in previous years.  In response, Councilmen Ron Santosky and Randy Hornbeck said, “that’s the way we’ve always done it” when they tried to defend the action.  They asserted that when incumbents wanted to be reappointed, the members were always automatically reappointed by the Town Board – a fact belied by actual practice (most recently when Zoning Board of Appeals Member Stanley Hudson was not reappointed in 2003). 

 

In order to establish a detailed procedure on filling such vacancies and to avoid future conflict regarding the process, Supervisor Pam Duke submitted a resolution in October 2004 that would have required advertising/posting of such vacancies, solicitation of letters of interest and interviews.  That resolution did not pass when Councilmen Santosky and Hornbeck voted against it.  The positions to be filled included one member of the Planning Board, a member of the Zoning Board of Appeals and one alternate to each body as well as a member of the Board of Assessment Review.

 

Duke expressed her disappointment in the Town Board’s decision not to interview applicants for the Planning Board ; there were no applicants for the other bodies other than the incumbents.  The Planning Board applicants included Beverly Schoonmaker, who retired last year with more than 30 years experience working as the Planning Board and Zoning Board of Appeals secretary; Robert Godwin, a local architect;  Steve Rosakranse, a local business executive;  and Alex Miller, a local realtor with extensive corporate and organizational experience.  In addition to reappointing Planning Board Chair Nadine Carney, who was formerly employed by Medenbach & Eggers a local surveying and engineering firm that represents many applicants before the Planning Board and who is now employed by Brinner & Larios which has been retained by the Town on occasion, David O’Halloran was reappointed as an alternate to that body.  In November 2001, O’Halloran expressed opposition to zoning in general and stated that he was against more detailed standards in subdivions and zoning regulations for wetlands preservation, historic preservation, preservation of open spaces, better commercial design, and preservation of local residential neighborhood qualities in a Rochester Residents Association survey.  In a letter earlier this year, veteran Planning Board member William DeGraw expressed concern about the Planning Board’s activities, stating “Disregard for the Zoning and/or Subdivision Regulations has been the track record of this board,” and cited frequent conflicts of interest.  For a copy of that letter visit, http://www.accord-kerhonkson.com/DeGraw-2-5-04.pdf

 

 

The Town Board also reappointed Bruce Schoonmaker to the Board of Assessment Review and Bea Haugen Depuy and Jim Kingston to the Zoning Board of Appeals as a full member and alternate, respectively.

 

At the same meeting, the Town Board rejected a call by Duke adopt a local law to provide for an escrow account to seek reimbursement of professional fees associated with applications before the Planning Board and the ZBA.  David O’Halloran pointed out that by failing to adopt the law, taxpayers rather than applicants will have to foot the bill for these professional.

 /

The Town Board also approved the 2005 race schedule submitted by Accord Speedway, Inc.  Supervisor Duke reported that a decision on an Article 78 suit by neighbors regarding the issuance of the 2004 permit came down in favor of the Town.

 

The Supervisor also reported that there is no enabling legislation that established the Town of Rochester Youth Commission and that she has asked the attorney for the town to draft a new Town Law that officially creates the commission, which has been operating for several years.  The new law will outline the Commission’s purpose, method of appointment, etc. in a manner similar to other Town commissions.

 

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Police: Stepson assaulted medical examiner

KERHONKSON - The stepson of Ulster County Medical Examiner Dr. Walter Dobushak was charged with misdemeanor assault and harassment, a violation, Wednesday after attacking Dobushak and Dobushak's wife, state police said.

State police at Ellenville said Benjamin Schwartz, 24, of 130 Krum Road, Kerhonkson, got into an argument with his mother, Harriet Loiseaux, and Dobushak Wednesday night at the family residence on Krum Road.

Schwartz threw Loiseaux onto a couch and punched Dobushak several times, cutting Dobushak's face, police said. Loiseaux and Dobushak were treated at the scene, police said.

Following his arrest at 10 p.m., Schwartz was arraigned at Rochester Town Court and sent to Ulster County Jail in lieu of $1,000 bail.  (Freeman 12/10/04)

 

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Historic Preservation Commission Meetings

At the request of the Town Board, the Historic Preservation Commission of the Town of Rochester has been restored to monthly meetings and to an upgraded level of activity.  Anyone with questions about the history or restoration of their property is invited to make contact with the HPC through this website or by writing to Historic Preservation Commission, Town of Rochester, P.O. Box 65, Accord, NY 12404."

[Editor’s Note:  The Commission meets on the third Monday of each month at Town Hall at 5pm.]

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 Injured dog up for adoption

By Ariel Zangla, Freeman staff

12/09/2004

 

AFTER BEING found at Minnewaska State Park and treated for injuries from tangling with a porcupine, a male German shepherd mix dubbed Waska is up for adoption in the town of Rochester.

The female German shepherd mix found with Waska, now called Minna, remains at the Ulster County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, where she is being treated for heartworm. After her treatment is completed in about 2{ weeks, Minna most likely will be available for adoption, too, shelter manager Chrissy Curth said.

Waska also was at the SPCA shelter in the town of Ulster, but he since has been returned to Jill Shufeldt, dog control officer for the towns of Rochester, Rosendale, New Paltz and Esopus.

Curth said Waska was depressed at the SPCA's facility and was not happy being around the other dogs. He's been doing much better at Shufeldt's kennel, she said.

Shufeldt said Waska, who is about 7 years old, is doing fine now, loves to be brushed, loves riding in cars and is fine with the other dogs at her kennel, though tending to ignore them.

"If anyone wants a nice, older mellow fellow, he's the one," Shufeldt said.

She said all applicants will be screened, and the only cost for the adoption is a $5 licensing fee.

Anyone interested in adopting Waska should call Shufeldt at (845) 626-5979.

Shufeldt said that before she removed Waska from the SPCA site, she allowed him to say goodbye to Minna.

The dogs were found by hikers in October in the state park, riddled with porcupine quills. Waska had bite marks around his eyes, and Minna had a cut on her leg. Both had collars but no tags, and Shufeldt said no one has claimed them.

"I'm thinking they might have been dumped at this point because nobody's claimed them," Shufeldt said recently, adding that Minna and Waska seemed attached to one another. But Cruth said, "It's hard to find a home for two big dogs like that together."

Curth said Minna is about 4 years old, sweet and loving.

"Really sweet," Curth said. "She's a really loving ... dog."

Curth said Waska, who is laid back, probably should be adopted into a quiet home where he can be on his own.

 

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Free email accounts for Not-for-Profit Organizations

Accord-Kerhonkson.com is offering free email accounts for not-for-profit organizations in the Town of Rochester and the surrounding area.  Services include list maintenance, automatic forwarding and other features designed for non-profit organizations.  All address will have the  (yourname)@accord-kerhonkson.com format.  For more information, please write to Resident@accord-kerhonkson.com.

 

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 Pataki deals for two more casinos in Catskills

By Joel Stashenko, Associated Press

 

ALBANY - Two Wisconsin-based Indian tribes have agreed to drop land claims in New York in exchange for permission to operate one casino each in the Catskills, Gov. George Pataki said Tuesday.

The administration said the agreements with the two tribes effectively "extinguish" the tribes' long-standing claims to 250,000 acres of land in Oneida and Madison counties of central New York that the Oneidas contend was improperly purchased from them in the 18th and 19th centuries.

The agreements were reached with the Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin and the Stockbridge-Munsee Community Band of Mohican Indians.

Cristina Danforth, chairwoman of the Oneida Tribe, said the deal settles the "oldest and largest" land claim in the tribe's history.

"Today we are encouraged that after 200 years of dedicated pursuit of an honorable conclusion to our land claim we are realizing a significant step," Danforth said.

Stockbridge-Munsee President Bob Chicks said it's been more than 200 years since his people were removed from ancestral land in New York. He said the deal with the Pataki administration is "a big step toward redressing that wrong."

The agreements are subject to approval by the state Legislature and federal officials.

Both tribes' ancestors have historic roots in New York state and both were allied with the colonists against the British during the Revolutionary War.

The United States recognizes the Stockbridge-Munsee as the rightful successor in interest to the Mohican Indians, who once occupied lands in New York's Hudson and Champlain valleys.

Joseph Griffo, Oneida County executive, said the land claim on property in the county had to end "for the good of our region."

"A fair, negotiated settlement is the only way this issue can be resolved in our lifetimes," Griffo said.

The settlements bring to four the number of agreements that Pataki has reached with tribes that include authorization to operate casinos in the Catskills. That historical resort area has fallen on hard economic times and in October 2001, Pataki and the state Legislature authorized establishing up to three Indian-run casinos in the region.

Deals have been made with the Cayuga Indian Nation of New York and the Seneca-Cayuga tribe of Oklahoma to also operate casinos, both in Monticello, Sullivan County. A third compact under the 2001 law is expected to go to the Mohawk Indian Nation.

None of the casinos has been built.

In announcing on Monday that he wanted five Indian casinos in the Catskills, not three, Pataki noted he would need approval from the Legislature for the other two.

On Tuesday, Pataki said the Stockbridge-Munsee tribe will operate on a 333-acre site in the Sullivan County town of Thompson. The Oneida Tribe has yet to identify a prospective site for a casino, Pataki said.

Pataki said the additional revenue to the state from the casinos would aid education.

Of the operators of the four existing Native American casinos in New York, the Oneidas of central New York have been the most critical of Pataki's negotiations with tribes from outside the state for casino compacts. The New York Oneidas have been running a $1 million advertising campaign against Pataki's deal with the Seneca-Cayuga.

"All this means is millions more going out of state," said Mark Emery, a spokesman for the Oneida Indian Nation, which owns The Turning Stone Casino resort in Verona, 35 miles east of Syracuse.

"Just as the Oneida Nation predicted, the floodgates are opened and the governor wants more casinos to give out-of-state tribes," Emery said on Tuesday. (Freeman 12/8/04)

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 Letters and Legal Notices

 

 

Dear Editor:

 

I was dismayed to learn that a further $6,000 is missing from the Rochester Town Clerk's Office.  This is in addition to the $18,000 in missing funds that was stolen during 2003.

 

Under State Law, Town Clerk Veronica Sommer is responsible for collecting fees from residents when they use the transfer station.  All this money is deposited to a bank account that she controls.  At the end of every month, she is responsible for writing a check to the Supervisor for all the money she received and for accounting for that money.  It doesn't appear that she has done this properly because the money seems to go missing when it's in the possession of her office.  Apparently, the records are in such bad shape that we might never know the full amount that is missing and over how long a period.

 

We've seen the Deputy Town Clerk arraigned on felony charges of grand larceny and falsification of business records.  The only way that this could have happened is if the Town Clerk didn't supervise the people and money under her control.  She's been in the job for more than 20 years, so either she is overlooking it or she isn't doing her job.  Why hasn't Town Clerk Veronica Sommer publicly stated that she will cooperate with investigators instead of hiding behind her lawyer.

 

The Supervisor and Town Board are doing the right thing by taking the steps necessary to learn how much money is missing and implementing financial controls over the Town Clerk's Office.  I urge the Town Clerk to open her books to public scrutiny, to cooperate with investigators and to help the Town move past this embarassing and disgraceful episode.

 

Tony Spano

Kerhonkson

 

 

 

Dear Accord TownCrier:

 

    Putting aside the question of whether it is an  appropriate educational exercise to spend taxpayers' money on Hollywood  movies, I think that it is worthwhile for a community to have a genuine  discussion about the issue that the school's visit to the Polar Express  has sparked. It was disappointing to see the vitriolic and mean spirited nature  of the discussion that is reflected

in the recent letters published by you on  this topic.

    Christmas is a wonderful holiday and a wonderful  time of year. It can be a very special time of year, especially for children of  the Christian faith. I think, however, that it is perhaps difficult for  some people to understand how hard it can be to raise children in minority  religious or cultural

environments in a society where one religion  dominates.  Christmas, for good or for bad, has become an  extraordinarily commercial and omnipresent holiday, where songs, and  programs, and commercials, and toys with Christmas themes, and symbols of the  holiday are everywhere and dominate all forms of media during this time of  year. Young children are surrounded by these symbols and those children who  are not of the Christian faith struggle to understand their place and their  identity, to understand why they do not have Christmas trees, why many of their  friends and classmates believe in Santa, and Jesus, and go to church on  Christmas Eve, when their family does not.

    Let's face it, Christmas is a time of year that can  be dazzling to a child, and often non-Christian children have difficulty  understanding why they do not celebrate that holiday in their homes. This is  precisely why public schools are particularly inappropriate institutions to be  sending children to movies whose themes revolve around a particular religious  holiday, and

particularly at a time of year when children are most under the  influence of the dominant religion's celebration of that holiday.

    The need for children to belong and to fit in is  enromous, and it is unfair and objecionable when the school system itself adds  to that pressure. Teachers are symbols of authority for young children,  and teacher's decisions and conduct deeply influence children. By taking  children to forms of entertainment that emphasize the dominate  religion's holiday as part of a collective

school outing, the child of  a minority faith or belief is made to feel the emphasis on one religious  holiday in a way that can be alienating for a child and can engender self-doubt  about the legitimacy of his or her own faith or even absence of a  faith.

        To suggest that themes  surrounding Santa are not religious as one writer does, is simply disingenuous.  Santa is exclusively associated with Christmas, as his historical predecessor  was.

        Moreover, to disagree with  the school's choice in this regard has nothing whatsoever to do with "Christian  bashing" as one writer angrily argues. We all need to be sensitive and tolerant  of each others faiths and beliefs.

All I ask is that the school consider a  little more carefully its choices, and how those choices may affect all of the  children in attendance.

        Of course, if the school is  taking children to movies and programs about all of the world's religions and  beliefs as part of a program to teach children about our differences and to  impart tolerance for all religions and beliefs, that is wonderful. But to  single out one movie with themes only about Christmas, is to make a  specific and exclusive choice about what to expose children to and is  insensitive to the minority of children who are not Christian, but who are sent  the message that celebrating Christmas deserves a particular focus by their  teachers and classmates and by the school as a whole. This is not an  appropriate choice for an institution that is funded by taxpayers,  including those of all different faiths and beliefs, as well as those who

chose not to follow any particular faith.

    Tolerance and understanding of others--potent  holiday themes indeed.

 

    Merry Christmas, Happy Chanukah, Happy Kwanzaa,  Happy New Year.

     MB, Kerhonson, NY

 

Dear Editor,

 

I personally appreciated R.G.'s letter.  We, the community, have a right to know how our children are spending their class time.  When I was a parent at K.E.S., I also had a problem with the children watching Disney movies during school time.  I also see no educational value in taking school children to the movies.  I hear, however,  that the teachers at Kerhonkson did incorporate the movie theme into the curriculum, like reading the book, and making math projects out of Polar Express cereal.

I do not know the movie "Polar Express," so I can not comment on its religious content.  I do know, however, that Christmas has become, in the eyes of many, a secular theme.  Santa, reindeer, and decorated evergreens, however, are part of a tradition which stems from the Christian religion, and is not part of the traditions of other faiths.

What really distresses me however, is the venemous attack on R.G. through your letters to the editor.  People accuse him/her of being an amoral liberal and anti-Christian, the "grinch" himself.  There was nothing of the sort in his/her letter.  S/He brought up a topic for discussion, something s/he thought a matter of concern.  S/He did not attack anyone. Instead of discussing the issue, and perhaps defending the school's choice, people spewed forth with accusation and hatred.  How does that solve the issue.?

This is the season of sharing and giving, and enjoying friends and family, no matter what the faith.  Let's not make enemies of our neighbors.

 

Harriet Koral

Kerhonkson

 

 

 

Hey thanks for writing about our little adventure in the NYT this week.   Of course the best part of everything was  to get a picture of long-time Kerhonkson resident Stella Pugliese (93) in the Paper. To see her face light up when I brought her the paper that morning  and hear her say "oh-my, oh-my, oh-my" just made my heart skip a beat.

 

I guess this is a good time to let you you know that I've been a closet lurker on this list for years. So allow me a few compliments. Love the format and economy of writing. Often sublime, at times it approaches perfection.

 

And to also let you know that I was a bit stunned to see the note about "Dude Ranch David's lawyers, as he sent me a veiled threat after the NYT article after I sent him what I thought was a funny note about his appearance in the paper that I arranged.

 

While it's clear he doesn't have a sense of humor what is less clear are the ethical boundaries he is operating under in his civic roles. A veiled threat to me, a lawyers note to the press. This is nothing short of outrageous.

 

Your voice is an  important one. Please don't allow anyone to squelch it. Please print the letters in big bold large type for no other reason than "Dude Ranch Dave" had the audacity to involve lawyers to attempt to encroach on your constitutional right to free speech is all I'm saying.

 

Harris Silver

Kerhonkson

 

 

 

Notice is hereby given that the Planning Board of the Town of Rochester will hold a public hearing on the 21st day of December 2004, commencing at 7:00 p.m., at the Town Hall, 50 Scenic Drive, Accord, NY, on the following Application: RV Associates, Special Use Permit for 2 additional buildings (40 x 120 each) to existing self storage facility, Mettacahonts Road, Tax Map# 76.2-5-3.110, "B" District. The above noted application and map are open for inspection at the offices of the Planning Board and Town Clerk, Accord, NY. Person wishing to appear at such hearing may do so in person or by attorney or other representative. Should this meeting be canceled, the public hearing will be held by the Planning Board at a date to be determined. (Freeman 12/11/04)

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Additional $6,000 Missing From Town Clerk’s Office

A recent review of town records by an independent auditor engaged by the Town Board discovered that bank deposits totaling more than $6,000 were unaccounted for in October 2004.  These missing funds are in addition to the more than $18,000 that the Office of the State Comptroller determined was missing in its audit ending in August 2003.  The missing funds, which consisted of checks and cash, were collected by the Town Clerk’s Office in October 2004 and deposit slips were prepared. The funds were not, however, deposited into the Town Clerk’s bank account.  The Town Board is in the midst of preparing financial procedures to improve the handling of funds in the Town Clerk’s Office, which by law reports to the Town Clerk and is not accountable to the Town Board.  Supervisor Pam Duke said that the Town was in the process of filing an insurance claim for the missing $18,000 and that the claim would probably be expanded to include the $6,000 recently discovered missing; the loss has also been reported to legal authorities.

 

In relation to the $18,000 that was discovered missing by the Comptrollers’ Office, Deputy Town Clerk Annette Rose was arraigned on charges of grand larceny and falsification of business records in late October 2004 and suspended without pay by the Town Clerk on November 4th.  An investigation by the Ulster County District Attorney’s Office and the NY State Police is continuing and it is unclear if additional people will be charged.

 

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Town Board Adopts 2005 Budget

The Rochester Town Board adopted its budget for the 2005 fiscal year at a meeting held on November 18th.  The budget contains a 4.7% increase in the combined tax rate for the Town’s General and Highway Funds.  The average Town tax for a home assessed at $100,000 is expected to increase from approximately $519.21 to $543.64.

 

“In adopting the 2005 budget, the Town Board looked at all costs to see where expenses could be reduced and made cuts in equipment purchases.  Unfortunately, the largest expenditure components are beyond the town’s control,” said Supervisor Pam Duke.  “Health insurance costs rose by more than 66% from last year’s budget, building maintenance expense increased by nearly 110% for new roofs in the Highway Department and the community center and we believed that it was fair to give employees wage increases to keep pace with inflation and to recognize their hard work.” Duke said.  The Town Board also voted to opt for higher deductibles in its employee health insurance plan to reduce the cost of premiums.

 

There were some increases in discretionary spending, which included an additional $15,000 for a new planner (some of which we expect to be reimbursed by applicants), funds for a new website and improved communications with the public, and additional legal expense.  There was also an increase in auditing expense and new financial software programs to address issues raised by a recent audit of the Town conducted by the Office of the State Comptroller.

 

The Town Board also corrected several errors in previous budgets by creating line items for recurring operating expenses that were not provided for in the 2004 budget and by eliminating certain income items that the Town has no reasonable expectation of receiving.

 

The increase in the total assessed value of real estate in the Town increased by approximately $5.7 million over the past year, which increased the Town’s tax base and reduced the individual burden on taxpayers.

 

Supervisor Duke and the Town of Rochester are participating in a task force with other communities and school districts in the Rondout Valley to address the issue of rising property taxes and to examine alternate funding sources for educational and other expenses.

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Minnewaska Dogs Available for Adoption

The two dogs found earlier this month at Minnewaska State Park are available for adoption. 

They are now well and available for adoption. They are German Shepherd mixes. One is a blond, female about 4  years old and very sweet. Her name is Minna. The other a male, black and tan,

about 3 years old. His name is Waska. Both wonderful dogs in need of new  families.  The dogs are free for a good home.  Please contact Jill Shufeldt, Town of Rochester Dog Control Officer at 626-5979 for more information.

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 Husband, wife charged in assault on cops

TOWN OF ROCHESTER - A husband and wife were arrested after the man kicked and bit troopers while the woman attempted to keep police from arresting her husband, police said. Spencer M. Santosky, 25, and Dee M. Santosky, 22, both of Wood Road, Accord, were arrested Monday at about 8 p.m. Spencer Santosky was charged with felony attempted assault, misdemeanor resisting arrest and violation harassment. Dee Santosky was charged with the misdemeanors of obstructing governmental administration and resisting arrest.

Troopers investigating a complaint involving a person who had stood in front of a home shouting obscenities, verbally harassing and threatening a complainant went to the Santosky residence and interviewed Dee Santosky who said she did not know where her husband was. Police said the woman then became uncooperative and refused to give basic information about her husband. Spencer Santosky saw his wife with the troopers from a wooded area and went to assist her, police said, adding that they attempted to arrest him on the harassment charge stemming from the original complaint.

While trying to arrest him, Spencer Santosky kicked a trooper in the chest and bit another, police said. Police added that while the troopers were dealing with Spencer Santosky his wife was physically trying to stop them and interfering.

Both Santoskys were arraigned in Rochester Town Court and sent to Ulster County Jail, Spencer Santosky on $10,000 bail and Dee Santosky on $5,000 bail. (Freeman 12/1/04)

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 Natural causes ruled in hunter's death
The Ulster County medical examiner's office determined that hunter John Stalter died of a heart attack last week.  Stalter's body was found in the late afternoon Nov. 23 on the banks of the Sanderskill, more than a day after he'd left his New Paltz home for the first day of deer hunting season. His truck was found a half mile down Jenny Lane in Minnewaska State Park Preserve. A broad search involving more than 40 rescuers was launched at dawn Nov. 23 in the surrounding woods.  (TH-Record 11/30/04)

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City Humor of an Ad Irks Some in Catskills

 

KERHONKSON, N.Y. - It was a tiny advertisement, 3 inches by 3 inches, buried on the bottom of the back page of The Blue Stone Press, a twice-monthly newspaper that serves this economically depressed Catskills town.

 

But the ad, announcing the availability of some long-boarded-up old storefronts on withered-up Main Street, was not the kind that usually shows up in the local paper, soberly promoting vinyl siding and auto-body repair. In tiny type, this one sounded like a little manifesto, written by a postmodern comic. It defiantly described Kerhonkson as a "real town - not like some of the other quaint towns around these parts." Anyone wanting to open a restaurant in one of the storefronts should leave the tofu behind, it warned. "And if you want to open a coffee shop," it continued, "don't make us learn new words for small, medium and large is all we're saying."

 

"Jews, Blacks, Italians (and all others) Welcome," it ended, and then, as if it had not been provocative enough, added, "No Artists or Canadians."

 

After the ad ran in late October , the angry calls immediately began coming into the offices of The Blue Stone Press. The company that placed the ad called itself Kerhonkson General, but it was really placed by Harris Silver, the president of a young New York City advertising agency called Think Tank 3, which has created sleek campaigns for products like Georgi Vodka and several environmentally friendly causes.

 

Mr. Silver, 39, who has owned a weekend house in Kerhonkson for years, got together with some friends recently and bought the three empty stores and some vacant apartments, with dreams of helping to revive the faded town, which has a population of about 1,700 and is probably best known as the onetime home of Clayton Bates, a k a Peg Leg Bates, the one-legged tap dancer.

 

The problem for the rejuvenators was getting attention for their cause. The answer, they concluded, was with the sharp-edged tools of marketing today: sarcasm and biting humor, with a hint of a point, but only enough to keep people guessing at the advertiser's real motives.

 

In an interview, Mr. Silver said he was partly serious about not wanting to see the town, in Ulster County about two hours from New York, become gentrified in a way that he feels many other upstate towns like New Paltz, Kingston and Beacon (not to mention many New York City neighborhoods) have been, in which artists, musicians and other creative types seem to be followed inexorably by antiques stores, overpriced shops, soaring real estate prices and then, of course, a Starbucks. In fact, the ad was largely a swipe at New Paltz, 19 miles away, with its tofu-loving restaurants, hordes of artists, and, now, a Starbucks on Main Street.

 

"We thought we don't really need somebody here who's just going to be putting up paintings on the wall," Mr. Silver said. "We need real businesses. We need people who are going to come here and sell socks and underwear." He added that his intention was to "set this place apart and try to let people know it has its own identity."

 

But he added that mostly, the ad - which also took oblique swipes at wine bars and expensive clothiers - was designed simply to get a rise out of people and to draw attention to itself. And if an art gallery wanted to rent a storefront, he would still probably sign a lease in a New York second.

 

"Obviously, we're not anti-artist or anti-Canadian," he said emphatically, adding, "We just threw in the Canadian thing because we thought it was funny." (Mr. Silver has repeated his "No Artists or Canadians" joke in big posters he has taped to the windows of his storefronts.)

 

But many longtime residents of Kerhonkson didn't find anything funny about the ad, which touched many of the raw nerves of economic-revival efforts upstate, seeming to pit art against commerce, weekenders against locals and urban sensibilities against rural ones. The ad provoked such anger (one caller declared it anti-Semitic, despite the fact that it specifically welcomes Jews) that the newspaper has declined to run it again, at least without some wording changes.

 

David O'Halloran, a longtime resident and owner of the Pine Grove Dude Ranch - a family vacation resort that is one of the area's biggest employers - said "the last thing we need to do is pour gasoline" on the kinds of tensions that constantly arise about how to revive the upstate towns and who gets to decide.

 

Mr. Silver is "the wrong person speaking for the people who've lived here for a long time," he said, and added that, as far as he was concerned, artists and artisans were "the growth industry in our community."

 

"Look at Kingston," he said. "Kingston is alive again because of the artistic growth there."

 

Mr. O'Halloran was not the only one angry. Mr. Silver - who, probably just to be more provocative, says he likes to think of himself the unelected mayor of Kerhonkson - was bombarded with angry e-mail messages, including one from a man who identified himself only as a manual laborer and 20-year Kerhonkson resident.

 

"Do your brothers-in-flannel up here who read these ads realize that your thinly veiled 'Think Tank' is really a N.Y.C.-based ad agency with a slick and pseudo-intellectual Web site peddling freshman philosophy about, among other things, art?" the e-mailer wrote. "Get real, you self-important fakes. I'd be willing to bet you drink fancy coffee drinks every day. In short, you have no authority to speak as one of us, and no business pretending to be from the other side of the tracks."

 

But Mr. Silver has found some local defenders, like Irene Rocha, a former Brooklynite who owns property near Mr. Silver's and thinks someone has to fight the resistance to change in the community. "I think a lot of people are just afraid of the New York City mindset creeping in here," she said. John Whiteman, a New York State crop adviser who has lived in the area since 1986, sees Mr. Silver as an entrepreneur willing to take risks that locals are not taking for the sake of the town.

 

"If people take offense to it," he said of the ad, "well, I think they need to find something in their lives to take up some more of their time."

 

He added, cheerfully: "I was up in Canada this weekend, and I didn't see any major protests going on up there about this."

 

In the end, the moral of the story seems to be that provocative, ironic, New York-style advertising is quite effective, even on the back page of a small, rural paper: Mr. Silver said that two of the storefronts have been rented and there is interest in the third, keeping alive his hope of a brave new Kerhonkson.

 

"This might be the hardest working small-space ad in all of advertising," he said. "In my wildest dreams I never expected anything like this."

 

One of the people interested in renting a storefront is the editor of the local newspaper, Chris Hewitt, who also runs a letterpress business and needs a home for it. But in an e-mail message he sent to Mr. Silver, even he was not quite sure whether he was eligible to participate in the potential rejuvenation of his hometown.

 

"I have to tell you, as a Kerhonkson resident, beer lover, coffee drinker, artist, Canadian, Italian, tofu eater and hard worker," he wrote, "I'm a little confused about whether I qualify or not."  (N Y Times 11/29/04)

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 Sotheby's expects to get $65K for first-known piece of printed pornography.
LONDON (Reuters) - The world's first known piece of printed pornography, described as the "quintessence of debauchery," is expected to reach up to £35,000 ($65,040) when it is auctioned next month.

"Sodom," penned in the mid-1670s, has been attributed to John Wilmot, the second Earl of Rochester and is described by auction house Sotheby's as a "closet drama rather than for the stage" with pornography "in almost every line."

"We believe this is the first printed pornography in English literature, a unique copy of the quintessence of debauchery," said Peter Beal, Sotheby's book specialist.

"It is one of the most notorious publications in literature and makes most pornography written 300 years later seem tame."

The book centers on the decision made by a lustful King to "set the nation free" by allowing "buggary" to be "used thro' all the land" and then details the dire consequences.

The book, the only surviving copy, will be auctioned on Dec. 16.  (CNN 11/26/04)

 [Editor’s Note:  The Town of Rochester is believed to have been named for the second Earl of Rochester.  The title became extinct upon his death at the age of 33 in 1680.]

 

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Kerhonkson man arrested on charges he deserted U.S. Army

KERHONKSON - A Kerhonkson man was arrested at his home this week on charges he deserted from the military, state police said. Michael P. Phillips, age unavailable, of 28 Cherrytown Road, was arrested Wednesday on a federal felony charge of military desertion.

State police at Ellenville said Phillips called troopers to report a burglary when, during a standard background check, they discovered he had deserted from the U.S. Army on June 5, 1991.

Police said Phillips was taken to Ulster County Jail without bail, then turned over to Army officials from Fort Hamilton, Brooklyn.  (Freeman 12/4/04)

 

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Man hospitalized after being shot with BB gun

A teen accused of accidentally shooting a friend with a BB gun will be in court Tuesday on felony assault charges.
State police in Ellenville said Jack D. Williams, 18, was acting recklessly with a BB gun when he inadvertently shot his friend in the chest. The incident happened on Wednesday at 385 Queens Highway, Accord.
Some two hours later, police said, the friend started to have trouble breathing, and went to a local hospital. He was transferred to Westchester Medical Center in Valhalla with a collapsed lung.
Williams turned himself in to police on Thursday.
He was charged with second-degree assault, a felony, and released on his own recognizance, pending his appearance in Marbletown Court. (TH-Record 12/5/04)

 

 

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Time for every season

People who could use a breather during the hectic holiday season have a chance to spend some quiet moments vicariously on retreat with Accord author Barbara Bash through her new book, "True Nature: An Illustrated Journal of Four Seasons in Solitude." It is published by Shambhala Publications.

Bash intertwines journal notes and water-color-and-pencil drawings taking readers along as she spies natural entities ranging from orange newts rustling in fallen leaves to a thistle that has released its seeds that are attached to fluffy filaments.

The subject matter is not new to Bash, who has written and illustrated several prize-winning books on wildlife and natural history. Neither is her calligraphic approach. She teaches calligraphy and field-sketching workshops throughout the United States.

Bash is married to Steve Gorn, a noted player of the bamboo flute. They have one child, 14-year-old Wiley.

Upcoming dates for book readings, in which Bash also draws images from her book, are: 3 p.m. Jan. 29 at Barnes & Noble, 1177 Ulster Ave., in the town of Ulster; and 2 p.m. Feb. 26 at Mohonk Preserve Visitors Center 3197 Route 44/55 in Gardiner. (Freeman 12/6/04)

 

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Letters to the Editor

 

Letter to Members of the Rochester Residents Association from Rochester Food Pantry

 

November 17, 2004

Dear Association Members:

 

Because you have been dedicated supporters of the Rochester Food Pantry, the Board thought you might be interested in a progress report about the work you’ve made it possible for us to do in the Town of Rochester.

 

As you may know, the Food Pantry was incorporated in May 1992, for the simple purpose of providing free emergency supplies of food to anyone in the Town who calls our hotline number to ask for our assistance.  We’ve had a number of homes in these years: the Rochester Reformed Church, the Accord Post Office and a room at the Rochester Fire House in Accord.

 

In our first full year, 1993, we provide three days’ worth of three meals a day for individuals and families.  Our records show that, in our first year, we assisted 241 families; 945 children, adults and seniors; with a total of 8,505 meals.

 

In the past five years, 1998-2003, the Food Pantry volunteers have been able to increase our effort to provide four days’ worth of three meals a day.  During this period, we, together, made food available for 2,408 families, 7,141 children, adults and seniors; a total of 81,553 meals – with only 20 people [volunteers] to do the work.

 

We are proud of the work of our volunteer bag packers and food shoppers, as well as of the many people like you who have donated food and/or money.  We believe that together we represent the best a community can achieve, caring for all our neighbors and helping those who ask for our assistance as they strive to get through hard times. 

 

Please know that we could not have undertaken this great effort without your support, nor can we continue to provide emergency food for people in need without the knowledge that we have the backing of our Rochester community.  This letter is sent in deep appreciate of your help.

 

Sincerely,

Wilma deJager

Chairperson of the Board

Rochester Food Pantry

 

[Tax-deductible contributions, made payable to “Rochester Food Pantry” can be mailed to: Rochester Food Pantry, PO Box 12, 12404.  Volunteer assistance to pack and distribute food at the pantry is always welcomed.  For further information, please call 626-7501 to leave a message for Wilma deJager.  Your neighbors will appreciate it.]

 

 

 

We received the following email on November 29th.

 

September 29, 2004 (sic)

 

Accord Town Crier

Rochester Resident’s Association

 

Re: Emails sent by David O’Halloran

 

Dear Sir/Madam:

 

I am an attorney representing David O’Halloran. I am advised by Mr. O’ Halloran that there has been an exchange of emails on November 25 to 27 regarding the Town Planning Board and the Zoning Board of Appeals that may be the subject of future publication. I am writing to advise that the contents of Mr. O’ Halloran’s emails are not available for publication as Mr. O’Halloran did

not make them in a public forum and expressly indicated that you could not make his comments public. Mr. O’Halloran has reserved his right to keep his comments private and any publication of those comments will be treated as a serious violation by Mr. O’Halloran who is committed to taking whatever legal action is necessary to protect the rights that he has expressly reserved.

 

If your publication seeks public comment by Mr. O’Halloran, he is available for interview so long as any interview is expressly “on-the-record.” He is also available to answer questions by email, again, so long as the exchange is expressly “on-the-record.” I am sure that this will provide a suitable opportunity for you to solicit Mr. O’Halloran’s views on town matters.

 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact my office.

 

Very truly yours,

Anthony McGinty, Esq.

McGinty &McGinty

PO Box 354

Rosendale, NY 12472

845/658-7145

 

 

Editor Responds

With absolutely no obligation to comply with Mr. McGinty’s or Mr. O’Halloran’s request, we have decided not to publish Mr. O’Halloran’s original unsolicited correspondence

 

Dear Editor:

 

This is a response to a letter posted by  R.G. of Kerhonkson who  complained about the Kerhonkson Elementary School taking a field trip to see the  movie "The Polar Express".  This person who jumps on the Christian bashing  band wagon doesn't identify themselves but insists that this trip is a violation  of the separation of Church and state.  I am part of a growing number of Christians who are getting sick and tired of those with a liberal  perspective making Christianity out to be a negative  thing.  First of all, the original intent of separation of Church and state  was to prevent the government from instituting one religion and forcing all to  worship according to that religion.  It was not intended to bar religion  from public forums.  Secondly, if R.G. has

seen the movie they would  know that the movie is about Santa Claus, not the birth of Jesus, therefore, it  is not a religious movie but a secular one. Contrary to popular opinion,  Christmas is about Christ not Santa.  Finally, as far as the trip being  offensive to religious minorities, I find it offensive that a child I know of  primary school age has come home from school with coloring

dittos of the  religious symbols of various other religions and the symbol used to represent  Christmas was a Santa.  However, I never heard any complaints about that.  Why is it acceptable to expose the children of the taxpayers to the religious  symbols of other religions but not of Christianity?  Christians pay school  taxes just like everyone else.  I think it's about time that

those who  are demanding tolerance of different religions practice what they preach and  start practicing a little bit of tolerance towards the Christian religions as  well.  I am sure the school required the parents to sign a permission slip  so anyone who didn't want their child exposed to this movie simply had to  refrain from signing the slip.

 

Denise Naccarato

Accord

 

 

Dear Editor

 

Reply to RG of Kerhonkson

 

As a teacher of elementary school children, I thought the choice of "Polar Express" to be an excellent choice of a movie for the children,  as it is a fine

choice of a book to read to children - one which I read to my first graders each year at Christmas.

 

Perhaps you wanted them to see "How the Grinch Stole Christmas".  It might remind the children of some people they might know in Kerhonkson.  I know it

reminded me immediately of you!!!

                                            DM of Kerhonkson

P.S. Have a Happy Holiday!

 

 

 

To the Editor,

 

Responding to prior e-mails to Editor, I'm just a skeptic hanging onto a life of successful failures like a Gunk climber.  The need to publicly express thoughts is only to sweep the path before my children, leaving their future attended, as it were.

 

Obviously R.G. has no kids in this school system and borrows from the prevalent victim-logy to imitate Scrooge and bad mouth's the P.T.A. because it was going to take children to see the 'Polar Express' movie.  I too can protest against the union controlled P.T.A. but there's not much you can say against a PG movie other then it's boring.  I assume R.G. is both an atheist

and an anarchist, a well rounded liberal, because R.G. won't say a word about the school sneaking the kids off to a homosexual love fest in New York City.    R.G. thinks perversion is a civil right; I believe it is a sexual enjoyment and should receive a entertainment rating, not an inclusion into the Constitution.  R.G. thinks that to expose the children to the art of

'giving and receiving' is bad and reeks of Christian morals, I think so what, it could be worse, it could be the R.G.'s clone world of controlled violence, throwaway babies, and ultimately no morals or values at all.

 

And I'd like to respond Gene Moncrief's complaint that winners need to get over it. Not I.  I want to see the President throw a knockout punch every week for the next four years.  Go Bush!   For forty years Democrats influenced and ruled until they backed a slick pathological liar with a

compulsive sexual disorder.  Bill Clinton even had the computer revolution supporting him, but he ruined that too.  So now Karma demands more then bitterness, hatred, and ill manners.  For forty years the Democrats never included Republicans, even though they were a main influence behind civil rights.  The Democrats lied about them, curse them and even rewrote history

to exclude them.  Democrats spite onto the world the images that Republicans are warmongering, racists, homophobes, so is it any wonder that now global mimicking malcontents throw that garbage back.    Democrats have yet to experience humility and will have to join the Republicans' inclusive tent to get things done.

 

This past election proves that people still rule.   Liberals call the voters dumb and stupid only because they remain outside of their political influence.  I call those voters; angels of enlightenment.

 

The math of feel good division which shows a Democratic 'control' over this Valley means absolutely nothing, except an idiotic worship of politics. Politicians have become transparent and this Valley tilted Liberal because frighten pueblo-types fled the city and dragged their matching collective agendas along.  At the same time Conservative middle class left this area because of the Superintendent's love of money.  One doesn't have to be blind to see that the local Democratic rise is but a burp.

 

Math is not the lesson Democrats have to learn.  If they want to survive as a party they got to listen to Puff Daddy, because he's got the best idea of why they failed.  Progressives excuse all shortcomings that pertain to themselves and hope the worst for others outside their clique.  Progressives work from a philosophy of fear mongering and can only speak over their

opponents or shout feel-good mantras into the wind.   Progressives hold the Republicans to a higher standard then themselves.   I wouldn't believe a Liberal again, no matter what you called them.   It's more then politics, it's the dumb brainwashing.  So address this Gene Moncrief, although I suspect you won't.  You'll spin the spin and pray to Mother Clinton and I

don't have to waste capital gloating, I got you babe.

 

Bill Dukas

Kerhonkson, NY

 

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 Legals

 

BUILDING INSPECTOR- Town of Rochester. Salary $11.65-$13.94/hr. Send resume to: Pam Duke, Supervisor, PO Box 65, Accord 12404. (Freeman 11/28/04)

 

NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION Notice of Complete Application Date: 11/12/2004 Applicant: MILTON MAKOWSKY Facility: MAKOWSKYS COTTAGE COLONY 274 ROCK HILL RD. ROCHESTER, NY Application ID: 3-5144-00058/00001 Permit(s) Applied for: 1-Article 17 Titles 7 & 8 Private/Commercial/Institutional SPDES Project is located: in ROCHESTER in ULSTER COUNTY Project Description: The Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has received an application to re-issue the following EPA minor Private/Commercial/Instituional State Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (P/C/I SPDES) permit. DEC has made a tentative determination to re-issue this permit for a five year term maintaining current effluent limitations and monitoring and reporting requirements. This permit involves the surface discharge of up to 19,800 gallons per day of treated sanitary waste to a Coxing Kill tributary. Additional information on this permit may be requested from or inspected at the NYSDEC Central Office in Albany. Substantive comments must be submitted in writing to the contact person. SPDES #: NY 021 9754 State Environmental Quality Review (SEQR) Determination Project is not subject to SEQR because it is a Type II action. SEQR Lead Agency None Designated State Historic Preservation Act (SHPA) Determination The proposed activity is not subject to review in accordance with SHPA. The permit type is exempt or the activity is being reviewed in accordance with federal historic preservation regulations. Availability For Public Comment Comments on this project must be submitted in writing to the Contact Person no later than 12/24/2004 Contact Person ANDREA L SHEERAN NYSDEC 625 BROADWAY ALBANY, NY 12233 (518) 402-9167 (Freeman 11/27/04)

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Upcoming Fire District Election

An election for the Accord Fire District’s Board of Fire Commissioners will take place on Tuesday, December 14, 2004 from 6pm to 9pm in the evening at two fire station locations.  All registered voters are invited to attend.  Voters will select one new commissioner for a five year term.  For the first time, absentee ballots will be available for those who are unable to vote in person.  Please contact the Accord Fire District Secretary at 626-3707 or download a form at www.accord-kerhonkson.com

 

The Fire District will be replacing a large amount of equipment over the next few years as the equipment reaches the end of its statutory-usable life. The Board of Fire Commissioners is responsible for planning and budgeting as well as legal compliance and administration for the three fire stations in the Town of Rochester.

 

 

 

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Deadline for Planning Board and ZBA letters of intent fast approaching

Letters of intent from people who are interested in serving on the Zoning Board of Appeals and the Planning Board should be turned in by December 2nd.  The Town Board did not approve a recent resolution introduced by Supervisor Pam Duke to create a written procedure for filling such vacancies when terms expire, however, we encourage anyone who is interested to apply nevertheless.  The boards are appointed by the Town Board. 

 

There are two positions on the Planning Board; one a seven year seat now filled by current Chair Nadine Carney (employed by engineering firm Brinner and Larios), the other is a two-year appointment as an alternate member, now filled by developer and Pine Grove Resort manager David O’Halloran.  The Planning Board is an independent body (that does not report to the Town Board), that is responsible for the issuance of certain types of building permits, subdivisions, and review of certain types of building and developments.  The Town Board recently hired a planning firm to assist the Planning Board in complying with law and the State Environmental Review process, which the Planning Board has criticized in recent years for not following.  The Board generally meets once per month (although sometimes more frequently) on Tuesday nights for about three hours.  Members are required to undergo training sessions (at the Town’s expense), and members currently receive a stipend of $50 per month.  Members are also required to adhere to the Town’s new ethics law, which was adopted last month.

 

There are also two positions on the Zoning Board of Appeals, a five year seat now filled by Chair Marijane Knudsen, and a two year alternate position filled by Jim Kingston. The ZBA reviews appeals and variance requests filed by residents.

 

Letters should be sent to the Town Board c/o Supervisor Pam Duke, PO Box 65, Accord, NY 12404 or by fax to 845-626-3702 or email to: Pamdreal@aol.com.  If you have any questions on these positions, also please feel free to email: AccordTownCrier@aol.com



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Body of missing hunter found on stream bank
By Deborah Medenbach
Times Herald-Record
Rochester – The body of a hunter who'd been missing since Monday night was found just as the sun was setting yesterday.
John Stalter, 62, of New Paltz, left his home at 6 a.m. Monday for the first day of hunting season. His wife, Christine, expected him home sometime that night.
"He always likes to go out hunting alone on the first day of hunting season," a tearful Christine Stalter said. "He's been hunting since he was 14."
She called police at 2:30 a.m. yesterday when he still hadn't come home.
"We started organizing our rescue efforts then, getting everything in place to start searches at first light," Lt. David Herrick of the state park police said.
Eight fire departments from both sides of the Shawangunk Ridge sent teams to the scene. State police on foot and in helicopters were joined by sheriff's deputies, rangers, park police from as far south as Bear Mountain and search teams from Ramapo Rescue Dog Unit in New Jersey. EMS teams from Kerhonkson-Accord First Aid Squad and Alamo Rescue were posted at the Peterskill Area ranger building.
Stalter's truck was found early in the day, parked about a half mile in on Jenny Lane. Rescuers began methodically searching the nearby woods, marking off a search grid over 400 acres and sending teams into the thick underbrush.
They had hoped the recent mild weather would work in his favor.
Daughter Judy Stalter, 24, was at the command center yesterday at 4:30 p.m. when Stalter's body was located. He was found by two searchers working on foot on the downward slopes off Jenny Lane, near the Sanderskill stream. Stalter was found on the stream bank.
"It's rough country out there," Herrick said.
No cause of death had been determined yesterday. Officials said Stalter's body was being taken to Kingston Hospital for examination. (TH Record 11/24/04)

 

 

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72,000 Square Foot Storage Shed Facilty Plans Presented

Resident Todd Bivonia presented the Planning Board with plans to construct a 72,000 square foot rental storage unit facility on Route 209 in Accord, across the road from CJ’s Automotive.  The facility, which would be one of the largest buildings in the Town of Rochester, is more than twice the size of the recently approved roller skating and family entertainment center that recently received site plan approval for the corner of Route 209 and Mettacahonts Road (that corner was formerly occupied by an abandoned apartment building).  The Planning Board did not take any definitive action on Bivonia’s plans at the most recent Planning Board meeting, however, the Planning Board did give approval for expansion of Rondout Valley Self Storage, a facility owned by Planning Board Vice Chair Shane Ricks. 

 

[Editor’s Note:  In the early 1990s, the then-Town Supervisor was convicted by Federal authorities of accepting bribes  in exchange for allowing hazardous material from NYC to be dropped off in our town’s landfill; now it appears that town residents are being asked repeatedly to store other towns’ unwanted belongings.  In the past few years, the Planning Board has approved plans to create three new self-storage facilities, including two that were owned by Planning Board members or their relatives.  All of these are on Route 209, part of the recently enacted Shawangunk Scenic ByWay.  We invite to you contact Planning Board Chair Nadine Carney, PO Box 65, Accord, NY 12404 to express your thoughts.]

 

 

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Restaurateurs share liver after transplant

By Jesse J. Smith, Freeman staff

Two weeks after undergoing a risky liver transplant procedure, Ulster County restaurateurs Ellen Peters and Jolene Ellsworth are expected to make a slow and painful but full recovery.

On Nov. 2, the two women checked into Westchester Medical Center, where Peters, who owns Ivan's Restaurant at the Rondout Golf Club, donated about 65 percent of her liver to Ellsworth, the owner of Zachary's Place in Rosendale, who suffers from Hepatitis C contracted during a blood transfusion.

"Every day is a struggle, but I'm getting there," said Peters, who must undergo a second operation because of complications with the first procedure. "The pain is about what I anticipated. There haven't really been any surprises."

Peters is house-bound and resting as she waits for the missing section of her liver to grow back, a process that is expected to take three to four months.

"I get very tired," she said. "I wash a couple of dishes and then I'm on my back for a couple of hours."

Ellsworth, meanwhile, is recuperating at home and undergoing a drug treatment regimen to prevent her body from rejecting the transplanted liver tissue. Twice a week, she must travel to Westchester Medical Center for follow-up treatment, said her husband, Steve Ellsworth.

Steve Ellsworth said he expects his wife to be back on her feet within the next three months.

"She's doing well, but she's in a lot of pain," he said. "The anti-rejection drugs suppress her immune system, so she can catch anything real easy. So we don't have a lot of visitors, and when we do, they have to wear a mask."

The women were just casual acquaintances earlier this year when Peters heard about Ellsworth's illness and volunteered for the surgery. Now, they speak on the phone several times a day but have not seen each other since the procedure.

In the months prior to the surgery, friends and family of the women raised thousands of dollars to help pay for Peters' surgery, which was not covered by insurance, as well as to help support her during the recovery period.

A liver transplant is a relatively new procedure that carries greater risks to both donors and recipients than kidney transplants, a more common procedure that also may incorporate living donors. Both women were advised that there was a one in 200 chance they would not survive the surgery and recovery.

"I think it's just amazing," said Steve Ellsworth. " Its amazing that they can do (a liver transplant) and it's even more amazing that someone like Ellen would step up to the tee and do it. That takes a very special person."  (Freeman 11/16/04)

 

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Minnewaska Dogs Available for Adoption

The two dogs found earlier this month at Minnewaska State Park are available for adoption. 

They are now well and up  for adoption. They are German Shepherd mixes. One is a blond, female about 4  years old and very sweet. Her name is Minna. The other a male, black and tan,

about 3 years old. His name is Waska. Both wonderful dogs in need of new  families  The dogs are free for a good home.  Please contact Jill Shufeldt, Town of Rochester Dog Control Officer at 626-5979 for more information. 

 

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Accord Local to Star in Film

A new film, “The Lilac Papers,” featuring Accord resident Stephanie Braxton, will air on Manhattan Neighborhood Network (MNN),  It will be shown on Time Warner Cable in New York City on channel 34. Wednesday  12/8/04   10:00PM; Sunday     12/12/04   9:00PM; Thrusday   12/16/04   9:30PM.  The film was an official selection of the 2004 New York International Independent Film and Video Festival.  You can view the trailer at www.lilacpapers.com

 

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Legislators want to cut tax increase in Ulster
By Paul Brooks
Times Herald-Record
Kingston – The Ulster County Legislature is pressuring county administrators to chop the proposed 24 percent increase in next year's taxes and maybe even eliminate any hike at all.
Both Democrats and Republicans jockeyed for position yesterday.
Democrats struck first with demands that department heads eliminate $10 million from the tentative budget. That would cut the tax hike to nothing, a big fat zero, said Democrat Hector Rodriguez of New Paltz.
But Richard Gerentine of Marlboro, the Republican Legislature chairman, sprang his own surprise during the meeting of the Ways and Means Committee. Gerentine had already ordered the administration and department heads to find the same level of cuts. And he has already set Nov. 30 as the date for a meeting of the Legislature to hear recommendations for cuts from a dozen of the largest spenders in the county.
"We can hear what they can do regarding the budget and the ramifications," Gerentine said. "The bottom line is we will probably be cutting services."
Democrats tried to keep department heads from throwing politically sensitive programs off the funding cliff first to avoid making more realistic cuts. "We have tried to be responsible. This is not a game," said Sue Zimet of New Paltz.
In reality, none of the legislators at the committee meeting yesterday knew whether such deep cuts are possible and what programs will have to go to get to that point.
"We will have a better idea after the meeting, ... a better understanding of why they made cuts ... if they made any at all," Gerentine said.
Democrats suggested million of dollars in specific cuts. For instance, eliminating about eight jobs, including one warden at the new jail, would save more than $400,000 alone, said Democrat Rich Parete of Accord. Another Democrat, Tracey Bartels of Gardiner, ticked off more than $800,000 in savings from an analysis of just two pages of the 342-page tentative spending plan.
Republican Majority Leader Mike Stock of Bearsville, not to be outdone, urged deeper cuts in the dozens of outside agencies that come to the county for money. County Administrator Arthur Smith cut the funding for those agencies 25 percent to $895,000 in his tentative budget. Stock said he wants cuts of 50 percent.
Stock also urged the Legislature to dump the road patrol in the Sheriff's Office and to sell the county Resource Recovery Agency, the county's trash agency. "We have got to find the means of getting out from under the $3 million subsidy we are giving it this year," Stock said of the RRA. (TH-Record 11-17-04)
 

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Ulster County's new jail delayed again

By Hallie Arnold, Freeman staff

 

KINGSTON - For the second time in two months, the completion date for the much-delayed Ulster County Law Enforcement Center has been pushed back by the construction management firm overseeing the project.

In a letter to county officials, Dick White of Bovis Lend Lease said the Albert Street facility won't be ready to accept prisoners until Aug. 12, 2005 - two months later than the June 7 completion date announced in October and 16 months later than the original target date of April 2004.

But even the August 2005 target seems tentative, according to White's letter to county Legislature Majority Leader Michael Stock, who chairs the Law Enforcement Center Project Committee.

"On a note of caution, please note that although the dates below represent the latest updates provided by the primes (prime contractors), most of them are very leery of committing to these dates and it is anticipated that we will have a very long battle to keep the project on the current schedule," White wrote.

He also said in the letter that manpower for some of the prime contractors is "very light" and that contractors on site "continue to balk" at adding employees and work hours.

According to the most recent schedule, the building will be fully enclosed by Dec. 10; roughly 95 percent complete by June 10; have all systems complete, tested and approved by the state Commission on Corrections by Aug. 10; and be ready to accept inmates from the current jail on nearby Golden Hill on Aug. 12.

But some members of the Law Enforcement Center Project Committee doubt the Aug. 12 forecast.

"They haven't met any date they've given us to date, so how can we be confident in this?" asked Peter Kraft, D-Glenford.

The new Law Enforcement Center, which will house the jail and the Ulster County Sheriff's Office, originally was to cost $71.8 million but could cost up to $21 million more: $4.7 million to complete construction and the remainder to settle claims and cover related legal fees.  (Excerpted from Freeman 11/24/04)

 

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Local Radio Station Features Jail Opening Contest

www.hhvrtowers.com/jail.htm

Jail Contest

Object: Guess the date that the first prisoner takes up residence at the new Ulster County Law Enforcement Center. Also, guess the amount the new center will cost.

Prize: $100.00

Entries must guess a date when the first prisoner moves into the Center between Jan 1, 2005 and Dec 31, 2005 and mailed to Kingston Community Radio with a postmark no later than 12/31/2004. If the jail opens after 12/31/05 an entries for 12/31/05 will be qualify to be a winner.

In case of ties the entry with the closest dollar amount will be the winner. If there is still a tie a random drawing will be made from the winning entries. In the case where no one selects the correct date the entry(s) with the closest date will qualify to be the winner(s) provided that the closest date is not after the Center's opening.  In determining the cost for the Center it will be the amount listed in the Daily Freeman or Kingston Times closest to the opening date. If differing amounts are published they will be averaged to determine a valid amount.

Mail your guess to Jail Contest, KCR, 82 John St. Kingston, NY 12401

Write on the front of the envelope your guess of the opening date and the cost for the Center.

Only one entry per person.

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Letters to the Editor:

 

Dear Editor:

 

Here is a piece of local news that merits some discussion .  The Kerhonkson Elementary School is going on a trip to see the movie The Polar Express.  This is a Christmas movie.  It is not a part of the curriculum nor does it meet the Learning Standards set by New York State.  The trip  will  take place on school time and be chaperoned by taxpayer paid school employees.  This constitutes a serious violation of church and state and may be viewed as offensive to religious minorities and others in the school community who do not celebrate Christmas.  This is a public school supported by taxpayer dollars.  Surely the PTA and school could have aponsored a more educationally appropriate trip.

 

R. G.

Kerhonkson

 

 

To the Editor

 

I was saddened by the combative tone of Arthur Hoell's letter "Politics Happen."   I'm sorry that he doesn't want to hear any more "contrived, venomous propaganda" and that he told those who supported Kerry to "Get over it, you lost."  I'd like to say, "Get over it, you won."

 

The fact is, nationally, more people voted against George Bush than any other sitting president ever.  Ulster County voted for Kerry by a strong 54% to 43% margin and in the only county-wide race, Judge Mary Work was elected by an 11,000 vote margin.   Democrats are alive and well in Ulster County, surpassing the number of registered Republicans for the first time in history.  On Nov. 21st, more than 25 people in Accord gathered for an internet conference call and joined more than 20,000 people at nearly 1,500 locations across the country to regroup and to find ways to continue to support progressive candidates and beliefs.

 

The elections ARE over.  But let's not lose track of the fact that we all live in a great country TOGETHER.  We have four years to work together and to help each other.  We can't do it without you, and you can't do it without us.  So please let's all look for opportunities to listen to one another and collaboratively develop our governing strategies.  We have a huge challenge

ahead of us just to get past our emotions and bring people from all sides back to a common conversation.  That has to happen locally and nationally.

 

I invite anyone who would like to help or initiate dialog to email me at RochesterDems@aol.com.  How 'bout it, Mr. Hoell?

 

Gene Moncrief

Accord

 

 

Dear Editor:

The possibility of shifting the means by which education is funded from property tax to some form of income tax has been a major topic of discussion in communities throughout New York State. The barriers and special interest groups aligned against such a shift are formidable; nevertheless, it's an idea whose time has definitely come.

 

Why? Because home owners throughout the state are being crushed by an ever increasing State and Federal reliance on property tax as a means of financing not only education, but a whole host of government services. The problem is that this is a highly regressive form of taxation, falling most heavily on those who can least afford it, namely those on fixed incomes and the individuals and working families whose incomes have not kept pace with the cost of living.

 

Only so much can be done at the Town level. As a Town supervisor I am responsible for municipal finances, so I've worked to ensure that we've done everything possible on the local level to help mitigate these increases and lower taxes.  Despite this, our school and county taxes

continue to increase in the double-digits, more than canceling out any savings.

As I mentioned, the forces aligned against a statewide shift to funding by means of a more progressive income-based tax are formidable. They include both the "big money" interests that hold sway over the legislature, and other special interest groups that do not want to lose

direct control over the funding process.  This situation is exacerbated by the complacency, unwillingness to act, and lack of vision of many Albany politicians who would rather not rock the boat. The problem with not rocking the boat is that it fails one of the fundamental tenets of effective leadership: effective leaders act boldly to challenge the status quo and produce positive change. It is noteworthy that both of our local representatives, Senator John Bonacic and Assemblyman Kevin Cahill support changing the system.

 

Several months ago, here in Marbletown, we organized a non-partisan Property Tax Reform Task Force. The Task Force has since been expanded to include official representatives from the Towns of Rochester, Wawarsing and Rosendale. Part of the Task Force's mission is to network

with 900 + towns throughout the state, to lobby Albany for a shift away from property tax as the primary means for funding education. I would like to commend the work of the Task Force as well as invite anyone who is interested in this effort to get involved by volunteering. The stakes

couldn't be higher, because a regressive vs. progressive tax-base affects all of us. Help us to protect those on fixed incomes, the American Dream of home ownership and quality education for all New Yorkers.

 

Vincent C. Martello, Supervisor

Town of Marbletown

 

 

Rochester town audit
I would like to clarify the facts surrounding the audit of the Town of Rochester by the Office of the State Comptroller.
OSC representatives met with the Town Board in March, three months after I took office. They reported serious deficiencies in the records of the town clerk's office in 2003 and contacted the district attorney's office for investigation. We didn't receive a copy of the report and were instructed not to pursue any investigation or audit of our own pending the outcome of the investigation. Accordingly, we were unable to address the specific problems raised. I did, however, draft financial and record-keeping procedures and contacted our accountants to seek advice on how to strengthen financial procedures in the town.
We received the comptroller's report on Oct. 13. With the specifics of that report, I will recommend stringent financial procedures to ensure that public funds are properly accounted for. In addition, I will recommend that the town's books be further audited.
Contrary to what the Record article states, I and the employees in my office have, and will continue to, cooperate fully with any investigation.
Pam Duke
Supervisor, Town of Rochester

(TH Record 11/5/04)

 

To the Editor,

Why should anybody attend school board meetings, they’re embarrassingly anti community and behave like a fiefdom unto itself.  Last year they mislead with an A.B.C. school budget sham,  the truth came out a month or so later when elected antagonists sucked out of taxpayer pockets, three million more. According to them; There was no moment to lose, the terrorists were reaching

the door jams and a investigated short-fall needed to be hidden.  But instead of presenting an honest budget in the first place they elected to be sneaky.  A,B,C & D.

 

It seems the constant reappraisal of property value to increase taxes is not enough, so now hired tax paid guns search for hidden emotional hooks to get deeper into the taxpayer’s pocket.   Scornful elitists chant, “It’s for the children,” during holistic finger dipping séances. I see no Abe, George or Martha upon any school wall, instead Ben and Jerry’s pint size sayings dangle rudely before the children’s eyes.   The school’s prevalent elitist philosophy and the homosexual agenda share the approach of Seductive Indoctrination.  The school is already entrusted with the kid’s

mind and if they get away with imprinting and exploiting the kid’s sexual desires then there’s nothing left that the kid can claim as personal and the domination of that child’s (political) future becomes a reachable goal. Instead of the equality of melting pot ideology,  the elitist now fill the

young mind with global dreams of multi-cultural-isms.  This approach is based on political division and ultimately rots a society’s roots, just ask the Dutch of Holland, or the Queasy of Canada.

 

Genetically most boys are born masculine; girls inherit nurturing, different yet equal.  Those traits should be encouraged.  School employees must notify parents at budget time: A review of all the coming year’s planned trips and a review of all new indoctrination techniques.

 

Taking the children for granted assumes too much.  The kids already are the first to be used, the first to be abused, slave labor to a system without pay or choice.  The children, for twelve precious formative years, must report daily to a muddled institution that at best, can only teach the art of mimicry.    We’d all be monkeys on a rock if it wasn’t for the concept of God.

 

Taking parents for granted is arrogant.  This district has an overabundance of administrators, more then enough teachers,  a fleet of go-for assistants, and a fixation on construction by a Superintendent who doesn’t know what a chalking gun looks like and uses the budget as a purse.

The budget must be made transparent to us all.  Not ‘pie in the sky’ but a direct transparency checks against corruption.

A child’s future is grateful for the discipline contained within testing. Testing actually reflects caring.  Testing is something we had in the past, only recently do-gooders took tests away.  Now they charge taxpayers extra to bring tests back.

 

The Superintendent should be sent out to pasture before more big buck spending occurs.  Vote no to all budgets until she’s replaced.  There’s enough automatic increase decreed  by the State each year, so, don’t be afraid to continuously vote no until Rondout gets another Superintendent,

one with talent and sensibilities.    It’s not enough to seek personal abundance and surround oneself with ingratiating employees and servitude neighbors.        

 

Bill Dukas

Kerhonkson NY.

 

 

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Legal Notices

 

Notice of Formation of Blue Dragon Capital Management, LLC. Art. of Org. filed with NY Sec. of State (SSNY) on 9/13/04. LLC is located in Ulster County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 86 Dug Rd., Accord, NY 12404. LLC has no registered agent and shall have perpetual duration. Its purpose is to engage in any lawful act or activity. (Freeman 11/13/04)

 

LEGAL NOTICE ANNUAL ELECTION OF THE ACCORD FIRE DISTRICT On December 14, 2004 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Annual Election of the Accord Fire District will take place on December 14, 2004 between the hours of 6:00 p.m. and 9:00 p.m. at the following locations: Accord Fire District Headquarters at the Accord Fire House, located at 22 Main Street, Accord, NY 12404 and the Rochester Company #2 Fire House, located at 922 Sampsonville Road, Kerhonkson, NY 12446, for the purpose of electing one Commissioner for a five (5) year term, commencing January 1, 2005 and ending December 31, 2009. All voters registered with the Ulster County Board of Elections on or before November 23, 2004 shall be eligible to vote. Applications for Absentee Ballots are available by contacting the District Secretary in writing, no later than December 7, 2004 or by walk-in, including by proxy, during regular office hours of 1pm-4pm on November 22 & 29, December 6 & 13, 2004 at the Accord Fire District Headquarters, located at 22 Main Street, Accord, NY 12404. Candidates for Fire Commissioner shall file a letter, requesting that their names be added to the ballot, with the Secretary of the Accord Fire District, at 22 Main Street, Accord, New York 12404, no later than November 24, 2004. Dated: November 17, 2004 Lori Kazmarick, Secretary BOARD OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS ACCORD FIRE DISTRICT (Freeman 11/17/04)

Legal Notice Please Take Notice that the Town of Rochester Town Board will hold a public hearing on December 2, 2004 at 7:00 p.m. at the Town Hall regarding a proposed local law establishing an escrow account for the purposes of a planner. The Town Board Meeting will immediately follow. By Order of the Town Board Veronica I. Sommer Town Clerk/ Tax Collector/ RMC (Freeman 11/20/04)

 

 

 

 

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Town Board Notes – November 4, 2004

The Town Board

·         Announced that Deputy Town Clerk Annette Rose had been suspended without pay by the Town Clerk.  Ms. Rose was recently arraigned on felony grand larceny and falsification of business documents related to the theft of $18,000 from the Town Clerk’s Office. 

·         Adopted a new trailer park law, establishing minimum set backs, lot sizes and limiting new trailer parks to county and state roads.

·         Retained consulting planner, Chazen Engineering and Land Surveying,  to review subdevelopments and other building projects in town. 

·         Adopted a new check only policy effective December 1, 2004.  All checks must be made payable to the “Town of Rochester” for all transactions.  No cash will be accepted anywhere other than at the Town Clerk’s Office.

·         Appointed Lucille Ebert to the Town’s Environmental Conservation Commission.

·         Decided not to pursue acquisition of privately owned Lucas Estates Water Company due to excessive costs.

 

  

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Rochester deputy clerk charged in town coffer theft

 

ROCHESTER - Felony charges were filed against a Rochester deputy town clerk stemming from the theft of over $1,000 from the town.

Advertisement

Annette M. Rose, 37, of Queens Highway, Accord, was charged Wednesday with falsifying business records and grand larceny, both felonies.

Rose is charged with stealing $1,158 from the town by falsifying business records to hide the amount taken, state police at Middletown said. Police said Rose made an Ellenville National Bank deposit ticket for the town clerk's bank account on July 1, 2003 that stated a revenue of $42 in checks and $1,158 in cash received from the A&M Hardware store for sales of transfer station punch cards. Police said the deposit actually consisted of $1,200 in checks, of which $1,158 was punch card revenue.

The charges were the result of an investigation by state police and the Ulster County District Attorney's Office following an audit by the state Comptroller's Office that revealed approximately $18,000 in fees and transfer station permits and punch cards missing from town coffers. The Comptroller's report said the audit found "serious weaknesses in the internal control structure as it relates to moneys collected in the Town Clerk's Office." Specifically, the auditors found $18,282 unaccounted for, all but $115 of it related to the sale of transfer station permits and punch cards.

In one instance, the auditors tallied the receipts of two local convenience stores and a hardware store that sold the punch cards to town residents to dispose of bags of trash at the town transfer station. In the period of the audit, which covered January 1 through Aug. 26, 2003, the three stores reported selling $21,300 in punch cards. However, only $12,745 was deposited, according to town records, leaving $8,555 unaccounted for, the audit report said. [For a copy of the Comptroller’s audit, visit

www.osc.state.ny.us/localgov/muni/audits/2004/towns/rochester.htm. (Daily Freeman 10/20/04)

 

In a press release Wednesday, Ulster County District Attorney Donald Williams said a grand jury would be convened this month to hear additional evidence concerning allegations of wrongdoing by members of the Town Clerk's Office.

Rose was scheduled to be arraigned in Rochester Town Court on Wednesday night, Williams said.  (Freeman 11/4/04)

 

 
Deputy town clerk charged with theft
Authorities have charged Rochester Deputy Town Clerk Annette Rose with stealing money from the town.
Rose, 37, was to be arraigned last night in Town of Rochester Court on charges of fourth-degree grand larceny and falsifying business records, according to District Attorney Don Williams.
Williams said Rose is accused of taking about $1,200 on July 1. Rose faces an inquiry by a county grand jury into whether she took much more, Williams said.
Two weeks ago, an audit by state Comptroller Alan Hevesi's office said more than $18,000 is missing from the town. The money was connected with the public's use of the town's trash transfer station, the audit said.
No one else has been charged in connection with the missing funds, but Williams said the grand jury will look at whether to charge others in the office of Town Clerk Veronica Sommer.
Williams said he expected Rose would be released on her own recognizance.
(TH-Record 11/4/04)

 

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Kerry Wins in Rochester

Voters in Rochester by a 257 vote margin voted for John Kerry president:.  For the past several presidential elections, the town has voted for the Democratic candidate.  The voting results mirror campaign donations to the Democratic National Committee and Kerry Campaigns, which indicated overwhelming financial support for the Democratic candidate.

 

Votes in Rochester

Kerry    1706 (52.6%)

Bush     1449 (44.6%)

Nader    76                (2.3%)

 

Votes in Ulster County

Kerry    54.7%

Bush     42.7%

Nader    2.3%

(Ulster County Board of Elections)

 

Contributions

                        Kerry/DNC            Bush/RNC

Stone Ridge            $7,750              $0

Accord              $7,950              $0

Kerhonkson            $750                 $600

High Falls            $5,200              $0

(donations over $200 as of 10/1/04 per TH Record 10/31/04)

 

 

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Two lost dogs suffer attacks by porcupines at Minnewaska

KINGSTON - Two German shepherd mix dogs tangled with a porcupine and ended up covered in quills and lost in the woods at Minnewaska State Park this week, according to a dog control officer.

The two dogs, a male and female, were found by hikers deep in the woods off a trail lying in a pile of leaves early Tuesday morning, according to Jill Shufeldt, the dog control officer for the towns of Rochester, Rosendale, New Paltz and Esopus. She said rangers at the park brought the dogs out of the woods and she brought them to the Kingston Animal Hospital for treatment.

Shufeldt said the two dogs were exhausted when they were found and did not want to be separated from one another. They were both wearing collars but neither had tags identifying them or their owners.

"It amazes me that people aren't going crazy looking for their dogs," Shufeldt said. She added that it is dangerous to allow dogs to run loose because it is currently hunting season and wildlife such as bears, porcupines and skunks can cause harm to canines. She added that traffic and roads are dangerous for dogs on the loose.

Shufeldt said she will pick the dogs up from the veterinarian today and then quarantine them for 10 days to determine whether the dogs contracted rabies from the porcupine. She added that if the owners come forward it can be determined whether the dogs have up-to-date rabies vaccines or the owners can quarantine the dogs themselves. She said if no owner comes forward and the dogs are rabies-free they will be put up for adoption.

According to the Kingston Animal Hospital the two dogs weigh about 80 pounds each. The male is black and tan while the female is mostly tan in color.

It took approximately 45 minutes to get all the quills out of the male and about 30 minutes for the female, according to the veterinarian's office. The veterinarian's office added that the male also had bite marks around his eyes and the female had a cut on her leg. Both are on antibiotics.

Pictures of the dogs when they were brought to the hospital showed them with quills in their paws and on their muzzles and backs.

Shufeldt said the dogs got "so embedded with quills they couldn't go anywhere."  (Freeman 10/29/04)

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Ulster jail setbacks intensify scrutiny

By Paul Brooks
Times Herald-Record
pbrooks@th-record.com

Kingston – The delay in completion of the Ulster County Jail has mushroomed to 18 months, eight months later than the estimate made in June.
And now, the collapse of a wall has highlighted questions swirling around the work on the $93 million project.
Democratic legislators squeezed the latest estimate of the construction delay out of Dick White Wednesday. White is the second vice president of Bovis Lend Lease, the construction management firm that the county hired to oversee construction of the 402-bed jail and sheriff's office complex. The delays and changes have pushed the cost up by $21 million.
White had said only that the project would be delayed past March. Legislator Rich Parete questioned that. "I deserve an honest answer. ... I don't like being lied to," Parete told White at a jail committee meeting.
"Choose your words carefully," White said back.
It was a question from Democratic Legislator Tracey Bartels that led to the exchange between White and Parete.
Bartels had attended a meeting last week of county officials, contractors and Bovis. At that meeting, the contractors said the project would not be done until June. White, according to Bartels, said at the meeting that he believed it will take until September to finish the job.
Legislature Majority Leader Mike Stock, who is also chairman of the jail committee, said yesterday that he had learned that a section of brick wall had fallen over but that White had not mentioned it.
The section of wall was more than 36 feet long and 8 feet to 9 feet high, Parete said.
At first, Harvey Sleight, county buildings and grounds commissioner, said last week's collapse of the wall was "no big deal." The masonry contractor had not connected the decorative wall to the blocks behind it and it fell. "No one was hurt," Sleight said.
But Sleight also said "it was a horrible piece of work. We check these all the time. I don't understand how it got to this point."
The contractor, Mason Builders of Orange County, is repairing the wall at its own expense, Sleight said. Officers at the firm could not be reached for comment yesterday.
Orange County's jail had problems of its own. It ended up with a 240-foot decorative wall with no purpose, a gym inmates could not use and $22 million in lawsuits. (TH-Record 11/5/04)

 

 

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Pocketbook pain: Property tax levy up 24% in Ulster County budget

 

 

KINGSTON - Ulster County needs to generate 24 percent more in property tax revenue next year than in 2004, according to the annual budget released Thursday by the County Administrator's Office.

 

Spending under the proposed $295 million budget would rise only 4.07 percent, or roughly $11.5 million, from the 2004 county's budget. But the property tax levy would jump a whopping 23.73 percent, or nearly $10 million, from the 2004 levy.

County Administrator Arthur Smith said he can't yet estimate how much the average property owner's tax bill will rise because the state has yet to set equalization rates, which are used to square the countywide tax rate with each municipality's assessment.

But the increase will be defrayed to some extent by an increase of more than 40 percent in the value of taxable property in the county over the last year, from $10.2 billion to $14.3 billion.

County Legislature Chairman Richard Gerentine said the County Administrator's Office built the best possible budget under the circumstances.

"We, as legislators, are going to have to make some tough decisions," said Gerentine, R-Marlboro. "If we're going to provide services we have provided in the past, then the (tax) levy is going to be a 20-plus percent increase. If we're going to stand up and make some drastic cuts, substantial cuts, then, of course, it will be reduced."

Democrats say the spending plan affirms their belief that budget reform is a must over the coming year.

"We are going to push for legislation to create zero-based budgeting for the next (2006) budget process," said Minority Leader David Donaldson, D-Kingston. "We've been trying to get that done for the past few years, and now I think we can get it done. We clearly can't keep using the budgeting methods we use presently."

In zero-based budgeting, each year's budget is created from scratch, rather than built off the previous budget.

Smith attributed the steep increase in the property tax levy to what he called a "structural deficiency" in the county budget, which is out of the county's control.

"This isn't news to anybody. This is in every county across the state: It's Medicaid," he said. "No other state in the union charges the percent that New York state charges to its local governments. It makes no difference what political party is sitting in the corner office here."

Other major cost increases in the proposed budget include short-term loans, largely for construction of the new county jail; the Golden Hill Health Care Center; the existing jail; social service programs; and county buildings.

At the same time, two major revenue sources in the county budget - sales taxes and the unappropriated fund balance - are under pressure.

The proposed 2005 budget calls for $81.7 million in sales tax revenue, a gain of 3.6 percent over this year but a smaller gain than the county experienced in previous years.

Smith also said county sales tax revenue for 2004 is lagging about 1 percentage point behind the county's projection.

In addition, he said, phasing out the sales tax on home heating fuel has cost the county $5 million in revenue over the past three years.

Another shrinking revenue source is the county's fund balance.

One of the final steps in the budget process is determining how much of the fund balance to use to offset spending and lower the tax levy. Over the past few years, Smith said the maximum amount allowable, 75 percent of the tax levy, has been used in this manner.

Doing so in the current budget would leave a $5 million fund balance, far below the state Comptroller's Office recommendation that municipalities retain 5 to 10 percent of their budgets in reserve. Based on the county's tentative 2005 spending plan, that guideline translates to the county holding a fund balance of between $14.75 and $29.5 million.

And because the budget is so tight and sales tax growth is on the decline, Smith said, it is unlikely the fund balance will appreciate to those levels by the end of next year, leaving the county in an even more precarious budget state than it is now.

"I can't overemphasize the impact that the decline in fund balance and sales tax growth will have on future budgets," he said.

Smith said the proposed tax levy increase was far higher than 23.73 percent in the early stages of the budget process and that he trimmed about $10 million from spending requests submitted by county department heads by cutting office, travel and conference expenses; recommending cuts in overtime and part-time pay; and rejecting more than 30 proposals for new positions and 30 reclassifications.

He also kept costs down by $2 million by planning to leave vacant jobs unfilled throughout 2005, he said.

The Legislature will hold a public hearing on the budget next Wednesday, and lawmakers are expected to vote on the plan in December.  (Freeman 10/29/04)

 

 

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More delay seen on new Ulster jail

KINGSTON - The beleaguered Ulster County Law Enforcement Center is unlikely to open in March of 2005, as county and construction officials had previously announced.

In fact, it may not even be completed by June of next year, some 14 months after the county's largest construction project ever was initially slated to open.

At Wednesday's meeting of the Law Enforcement Center Committee, Ulster County lawmakers asked Dick White of Bovis Lend Lease, the project construction manager, how his news that the building will be sealed from the elements in mid-December would affect the completion date.

White did not provide a completion date at the meeting, despite committee Democrats urging him to, and despite a completion date of June 7, 2005, being published in a report White provides to update lawmakers on the status of the project each month.

"The only thing I'm comfortable probably saying is I doubt it will be March," White said.

At last week's monthly owner/architect/construction manager meeting, which is closed to the public, White is said to have discussed the June 7 date at length with contractors, some of whom said they don't feel the building can be done until next September, according to Legislator Richard Parete, D-Accord, and Tracey Bartels, D-Gardiner. Bartels attended the meeting.

It was in August, at the last publicly held meeting of the owner/architect/construction manager meeting, that the electrical and general contractors on the job told lawmakers that Bovis' estimated completion date in March 2005 was impossible to meet, and that they had as much as a year's worth of work left on the job.

Some county leaders discounted the contractors' statements, suggesting they were motivated by legal claims the contractors had filed against the county for additional costs they've incurred due to the delay in the project.

White closed that meeting to the public the following month, saying holding the monthly progress meetings in public was "useless" in helping him meet his goal of completing the building.

News broke in May that the $71.8 million project could be as much as $21 million over budget. In September, lawmakers approved spending an additional $8 million on construction.

On Wednesday night, committee Chairman Michael Stock, R-Woodstock, asked White to provide a definitive completion date for the project in a written report form. White said he felt he could provide this information in about two weeks.

Parete said that White lied to lawmakers during the meeting by saying he did not have a completion date when one was included in the most recent report on the project, and said that made him doubt White's word on other statements. He also said he thought the reason White closed the monthly owner/architect/construction manager meeting was to keep that information from lawmakers.

"I would appreciate it if you chose your words wisely," White responded.

Stock accused Parete of trying to "make something out of nothing," and said he's confident that White will be able to produce a completion date that will stick, based on the project's current status and the fact that the building will be fully enclosed sometime next month. (Freeman 11/4/04)

 

 

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Men indicted on child-rape charges
An Ulster County grand jury on Friday indicted two men on charges they raped a 14-year-old girl at a campground over the summer.
Colin McDonough, 19, of Tillson, and Joseph Flynn, 25, of Staten Island, are accused of raping the girl at the Rondout Valley Campground in the Town of Rochester beginning the night of Aug. 27 through the early morning hours of the following day, said county Assistant District Attorney Emmanuel Nneji.
McDonough was indicted on the following charges: first- and second-degree rape, first-degree criminal sexual assault, second-degree criminal sexual act and endangering the welfare of a child. The grand jury also indicted McDonough for second-degree sexual abuse and endangering the welfare of a child for an incident involving the same girl last December, Nneji said.
Flynn was indicted on charges of first- and second-degree rape, and endangering the welfare of a child, officials said.
It was unclear yesterday when the two would be arraigned on the charges. (TH-Record 11/01/04)

 

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Teen prank prompts extensive search, rescue

ELLENVILLE - Two teens were charged with causing a large-scale, multiple-agency rescue operation after one made a false emergency call to 911 stating he had been shot, police said.

Advertisement

Darryl D. Conklin, 19, of 248 Berme Road, Ellenville, and Stacey L. Williams, 16, of 24 Barry Lane, Accord, were arrested Thursday night and each charged with the misdemeanors of reckless endangerment, falsely reporting an incident, possession of stolen property and conspiracy.

On Wednesday at approximately 6:30 p.m. a 911 cell phone call was received from a frantic male who said he was the victim of a gunshot wound and was bleeding, Chief Philip Mattracion of the village of Ellenville police said Friday. The chief said the caller reported he needed immediate assistance and was in a cornfield, in the woods on the bank of the Beaverkill creek off Sewer Plant Road in the village of Ellenville. The call caused police to begin a "search and rescue mission" with the assistance of several other agencies, Mattracion said.

During the search, which lasted until 11 p.m., county 911 received two more calls from the same male stating he could see the lights of the helicopters as they flew over them, Mattracion said. He said the rescue resumed Thursday morning at daylight and ended at 1 p.m., during which county 911 received another call from the male saying the helicopter was above him but rescuers wouldn't find him. Mattracion said that call was received at about 12:30 p.m. and about that time rescuers saw a dirt bike going through the rescue area. With the assistance of ground and air support the dirt bike was found and a male, Conklin, voluntarily submitted to questioning and a polygraph test, the chief said. He said Conklin confessed to making the calls and Williams was identified as a co-conspirator.

Mattracion added that another investigation had been going on during the search into the cellular phone used to make the 911 calls. He said investigators learned the phone had been stolen during the night of Oct. 23, and records were subpoenaed by police as a result.

"I can tell you that this operation was very costly for the agencies involved," Mattracion said. He added that one of the teens said the incident started as a joke but got bigger than they expected. The chief would not identify which of the teens made the statement.

"This was an unfortunate and tragic waste of taxpayer and agency resources," Mattracion said. He added that at any time one of the rescuers could have been hurt or killed during the search.

Conklin was arraigned in Ellenville Village Court and sent to Ulster County Jail on $5,000 bail while Williams was released to her parents and attorney on an appearance ticket.

Village police were assisted by state police Aviation Unit, state Department of Environmental Protection Aviation Unit, state police at Ellenville and Ulster, the Ulster County Sheriff's Office and its all-terrain vehicle units, forest rangers, the Ellenville Rescue Squad, the Ellenville and Napanoch fire and all-terrain vehicle units, county 911 and the Ulster County Fire and Rescue coordinators.  (Freeman 10/30/04)

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 Legals and Letters

 

Notice is Hereby Given that the Zoning Board of Appeals of the Town of Rochester will hold a public hearing on the 9th day of November 2004, commencing at 7:00 p.m. at the Town Hall, 50 Scenic Drive, Accord, NY, on Application by John Gray for 2 Area Variance for fence height located at 234 Queens Highway, Kerhonkson, Tax Map # 68.4-6-11 and in an R-2 District of the Town of Rochester. The above noted application and map are open for inspection at the offices of the Zoning Board of Appeals and Town Clerk, Accord, NY. Persons wishing to appear at such hearing may do so in person or by attorney or other representative. (Freeman 10/30/04)

 

 

 

Dear Editor:

 

It's disturbing to hear that the taxpayers of the Town of Rochester are the victim of the theft of $18,000 in town money.  The recent State Comptroller's audit discussed bad recordkeeping and money missing from the Town Clerk's office and the investigation by the Ulster County District  Attorney.  When I was a town councilman, I brought  this matter to the attention of the Town Board in October 2001.  I was told that I was acting  improperly.  Yet, what did the Town Board of that time do to investigate or  even take steps to account for taxpayers' money?  It looks like nothing.  The Town of Rochester is too small to play partisan politics; its elected  officials should do what's best for the Town, not what's best for their  friends.

 

At the last Town Board meeting, Councilmen Ron Santosky and Randy Hornbeck  voted against a resolution that would advertise vacancies on citizen's boards and commissions when terms expire.  They said incumbents should  automatically be reappointed because it was "fair".  They shouldn't be concerned about what's best for the incumbents, they should look out for  what's best for the Town, getting the best qualified and hardest working  people for the job (who are sometimes the incumbents).  The Town does it  for paid employee positions, why not for volunteer positions?

 

Closed government isn't good for our town or its people.  Only with  transparency in the decision making process can our residents get a fair  shake.

 

Tony Spano

Kerhonkson

 

 

Dear Accord Town Crier publishers,

 

This is the first time I see advertisement for rentals in your newsletter; and  I am disturbed by it. I feel that this publication is for official notices, community related announcements and should not be cluttered by pure commercials. First it's cottage rentals, but what's next? Purple pills?

 

I'm not totally against ads, but the format of how the ads are presented and displayed must be made explicitly clear, and not shown in the same way as the editorial content.

 

Sincerely,

Alex Shamson

Kerhonkson resident

 

Editor’s Reply:  We frequently carry promotions of local businesses, community organizations, lost and found pets, legal notices and other “ads” of a classified nature.  This is not the first.  We use our discretion in inserting these ads, which we post and believe that they provide a community service, just as our business listings and information on local artists and historical sites.

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No Updates Yet on Money Missing from Town Clerk’s Office

Prosecutors investigating $18,000 in money missing from the Office of the Town Clerk have not announced the results of their continuing investigation.  The missing money was discovered in a routine audit of the Town’s records conducted by the Office of the State Comptroller for the first eight months of 2003.  The auditor’s report mirrored allegations of sloppy recordkeeping and cash controls in October 2001 by then-Town Councilman Tony Spano in a report entitled, “Negligence and Mismanagement of Town Funds.”  The Town Board is expected to address the matter at its audit meeting on October 28th.  In July 2004, Town Clerk Veronica Sommer read a letter at a Town Board meeting in response to Spano’s allegation stating that no evidence was established to support the filing of any criminal proceedings.

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Town Clerk’s Office Closes at Lunchtime

After a three month trial period during which the Town Clerk’s Office was open during lunch time on weekdays, the Town Clerk has decided no close the Town Clerk’s Office for one hour during lunch.  Town Clerk Veronica Sommer made the announcement at the October 7, 2004 Town Board meeting.

 

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Planning Board and ZBA minutes now on-line

Selected Planning Board and Zoning Board of Appeals minutes have now been placed online at

http://www.accord-kerhonkson.com/government.htm (at the bottom of the page).  The electronic files for the meeting minutes were obtained by the Rochester Residents Association under the Freedom of Information Law.   Electronic minutes for Town Board minutes were also requested from the Town Clerk, who responded that she was unable to provide the minutes. 

 

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Rochester to become Per Capita Storage Shed Capital of Ulster County, Perhaps NY State

We have learned that the rental storage facility on Mettacahonts Road and Route 209 owned and operated by Planning Board member Shane Ricks is considering a further expansion.  In addition, the rental storage facility opened and later sold by Randy Hornbeck on Route 209 near Kyserike Road is also considering expansion.  These two expansion projects are in addition to the new facility that is planned for now-vacant land on Route 209 in Accord, across from CJ’s Automotive.  Because of restrictions against such facilities in nearby towns, Rochester now has the dubious honor of  storing junk from other towns on our most scenic and well-traveled thoroughfare.

 

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Dog trainer finds shelter at Accord pound

ACCORD - Nine years after training her own black Labrador, Remy, at Rondout Valley Animals for Adoption, Jennifer McGrane has returned to the shelter to run her business, Tail Spin Dog Training.

A recent event, it's created a symbiotic relationship that has already paid off for her clients and some of the dogs waiting for homes at the shelter.

McGrane started Tail Spin in 1999 in Lake Katrine. There, in a roughly 2,400-square-foot indoor facility, she trained 80 canine students. At Rondout Valley, the indoor area is about the same size but ample outdoor space is also available.

"I try to stay outside as long as possible," she said. "Dogs love it."

"We work together in the shelter dog program," she said. "It's a joint effort to teach the dogs agility, maintain their socialization and involve people. My clients volunteer to bring a shelter dog to a class."

Jane Kopelman, who manages the shelter, said every dog that's been through agility training has been adopted. "One of the things we strive for in this shelter is ... mental and physical quality of life," she said.

"We are an open admission shelter. Any dog that needs to be surrendered, regardless of age, health or temperament, we will take the dog," said Kopelman. Not every dog that comes through here is adoptable."

"We make a dollar go a very long way," she said. "We rely solely on donations and income from agility training. ... Jennifer coming here was a godsend."

For McGrane, who pays rent to run Tail Spin at Rondout Valley, the shelter is also a source of new students.

Six weeks of classes cost $80 if you bring your dog, and are free if you work with a shelter dog. "All we ask is for them to bring some good-smelling treats," she said. There are increasing levels of agility training classes for dog owners looking for more than the basics.

After six weeks of classes with a shelter dog, volunteers can bring their own dog or a shelter dog in for a private lesson with McGrane.

About half of her "students" are purebreds, and McGrane said she doesn't think there's a difference in trainability between those and mixed breeds. Roughly 20 percent are puppies, and most are between six months and two years old.

All About Dogs, run by a separate trainer, offers basic obedience and "Puppy K" classes at the shelter.

The trainers also participate in the shelter's Training Wheels program, a mobile outreach effort that brings education, supplies, training, and help with spaying and neutering into the community.

Fundraisers, like agility matches, also contribute to keeping the not-for-profit shelter afloat.

Rondout Valley Animals for Adoption was founded by Sue Sternberg, who also founded the "Community Animal Shelter Association," a separate not-for-profit organization dedicated, according to her web site, "to pet owner outreach, safe animal adoptions, and quality of life at animal shelters around the world."  (Freeman 10/24/04)

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Judge sets aside $55,000 verdict in Rochester suit

 ACCORD - A state Supreme Court justice has set aside a jury verdict that has awarded $55,000 in damages to an Accord man who claimed he was threatened and attacked by nine town of Rochester highway workers three years ago.

Supreme Court Justice Michael Kavanagh reversed the decision that awarded David Stoltz, a sculptor, who had sought $4 million in compensatory and punitive damages for the attack he alleged took place in February 2001 at a storage shed adjacent to his property at 33 Main St.

Stoltz said Monday night he expected to appeal Kavanagh's decision. He said the decision appeared to be based on a "technicality."

"We feel that a jury's verdict is sacred and should be maintained," Stoltz said.

Town Supervisor Pam Duke, who took office in January, said she was satisfied with Kavanagh's decision. "I am pleased with it, and let's move on," she said.

In his ruling, Kavanagh said the "intentional infliction of emotional distress claim" in the original lawsuit should not have been presented to the jury.

Town Attorney Jeffery Miller said the judge found no "legal basis" to submit such a claim to the jury, so the entire case was set aside.

According to the lawsuit filed by Stoltz in June 2002, the incident grew from an ongoing dispute with the town Highway Department over the storage of road salt, calcium chloride and other potentially harmful materials on a dirt floor in the shed.

Stoltz said the shed lay less than 70 feet from his well and he was concerned about the chemicals leaching into his water supply.

On Feb. 8, 2001, Stoltz said, he was attacked by highway department workers after he entered the shed to take photographs of them loading bags of calcium chloride stored in the shed onto trucks.

Highway Department Superintendent Wayne Kelder admitted in a statement to state police that he had told Stoltz, "You can't take pictures of me because I'm an elected official. I'm going to have to confiscate the film." However, he said the comments were made in jest.

Kelder denied coming closer than 15 feet to Stoltz. Depositions from other highway department employees present at the shed that day also denied any attack on Stoltz.

According to Stoltz's attorney, Jonathan Follander, the jury had found for Stoltz on two counts, battery and intentional infliction of emotional distress. Two additional counts of verbal assault and negligent supervision by Kelder of his employees were thrown out before trial by Kavanagh.

Follander has said the jury awarded Stoltz $50,000 for emotional distress based on testimony from Stoltz and a neuropsychiatrist about the fear, intimidation and anxiety he felt as a result of the alleged attack, including a diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder. The jury awarded Stoltz an additional $5,000 based on his allegation that highway workers shoved him to the ground and tried to seize his camera.

According to Follander, Stoltz's allegations were backed up by testimony from several individuals who heard accounts of the incident from workers present that day as well as photographs taken by Stoltz showing hands thrust in front of his camera and workers advancing toward him from the back of the shed.  (Freeman 10/26/04)

[Editor’s note: This case is one of three separate incidents in which town employees have been accused of physically harming town residents.  Town Building inspector Douglas Dymond allegedly shoved a town resident in the Planning and Zoning Office in May 2000; the case was withdrawn prior to trial after Dymond apologized publicly.  Earlier this year, deputy town clerk Annette Rose was accused of physically harassing a neighbor – the case is pending.  All town employees are now required to attend a sensitivity and diversity training session.]

 

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Kerhonkson Man Sentenced in Child Abuse Case

KINGSTON - A 38-year-old Kerhonkson man, who has a previous felony sodomy conviction, was sentenced to more than 20 years in state prison on charges he had sexual contact with an 8-year-old boy.

Robert Kuklinski Jr. was sentenced Wednesday by Surrogate's Court Judge Paul Gruner to 24 years in state prison on felony charges of sodomy, sexual misconduct and sexual abuse, as well as misdemeanor endangering the welfare of a child.

"This defendant is a sexual predator, preying on the young and innocent of this community," Gruner, who handled the case as acting county court judge, said in a press release from the Ulster County District Attorney's Office.

Kuklinski was arrested in April 2003 by state police at Ellenville on charges he sexually assaulted an 8-year-old boy in Ulster County, District Attorney Donald Williams said. He said the incident occurred in February 2003.

Kuklinski was indicted on the charges in May 2003. He pleaded guilty on Sept. 21, just as a trial was to begin in the case, Williams said.

Williams said Kuklinski is a second felony offender who had been convicted in 1993 of felony sodomy for an incident that occurred in Ulster County with a child that was over the age of 8.

"The defendant's acts of child abuse reduce him to the lowest form of humanity," Williams said in the press release. "In light of his repeated behavior, we are left with no choice but to remove him from society." (Freeman 10/21/04)

 

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Legals and Letters

NOTICE OF FILING of AMPLE SELF STORAGE LLC 1. The name of the limited liability company is AMPLE SELF STORAGE, LLC. 2. The date of filing of the articles of organization with the Secretary of State was: October 4, 2004. 3. The county within this state in which the office of the company is located is Ulster. 4. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the company upon whom process may be served. The post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the limited liability company services upon him/her is: c/o Todd Bivona, Ample Self Storage, LLC, P.O. Box 576, Kerhonkson, New York 12446. 5. the business has been formed to: engage in any lawful act or activity for which limited liability companies may be organized under the LLCL.

 

 

Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company ("LLC"). Name:Thunder Transport LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York ("SSNY") on 7/27/2004. Office Location: Ulster County. The "SSNY" is designated as agent of the "LLC" upon whom process against it may be served. "SSNY" shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at: 95 Dug Road, Accord, NY 12404. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. (Freeman 10/28/04)

 

Notice Notice is hereby given that the fiscal affairs of the Town of Rochester for the period beginning on January 1, 2003 and ending on August 26, 2003 have been examined by the office of the state comptroller and that the report of examination performed by the office of the state State Comptroller has been filed in my office where it is available as a public record for inspection by all interested persons. Pursuant to section thirty-five of the general municipal law, the governing board of the Town of Rochester may in its discretion, prepare a written response to the report of examination performed by the office of the state comptroller and file any such response in my office as a public record for inspection by all interested persons not later than (Last date of which response may be filed- 90 days after presentation of report to board). Veronica I. Sommer Town Clerk (Freeman 10/21/04)

G.T. Morgan Trucking, LLC has filed articles or organization with the Secretary of State of NY on September 29, 2004. The office is in Ulster County. The Secretary of State is designated as agent upon whom process may be served. The address to which the Secretary of State shall forward copies of any process is: PO Box 475, Kerhonkson, NY 12466. Filed by: Ryan, Roach & Ryan LLP (10/23/04) Freeman

 

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State Auditors determine that $18,000 is unaccounted for in Town Clerk’s Office, Matter Referred to Ulster County District Attorney’s Office

 

Auditors from the Office of the State Comptroller spent approximately five months in mid-2003 auditing the books and records of the Rochester Town Clerk Veronica Sommers’ office for the period January 1, 2003 to August 26, 2003.  The report of examination, which was issued only on October 8, 2004, included the following executive summary:

 

Town of Rochester – Executive Summary

 

Background

The Town Clerk of the Town of Rochester serves as clerk to the Town Board. She also acts as an agent for the Town, County of Ulster and various New York State agencies. During the period January 1, 2003 through August 26, 2003, her office collected and processed receipts totaling approximately $171,000. Such collections included permits and punch card sales for the Town’s transfer station; environmental conservation licenses; and building and zoning permits and fees. In addition, as the Records Management Officer for the Town, she is responsible for the storage, management and protection of vital active and archival records.

 

During our On-Site Risk Assessment process, it was brought to our attention that the transfer station revenues recorded on the Town Clerk’s monthly reports to the Town Supervisor did not agree with the revenues recorded on the transfer station attendant’s monthly reports to the Supervisor. Subsequent observations and inquiries of the Town Clerk and her staff indicated serious weaknesses in the internal control structure as it relates to moneys collected in the Town Clerk’s office.

 

Scope and Objectives

The objective of our audit was to review the policies and procedures of the Town Clerk’s office. Our audit addressed the policies and procedures of the Town Clerk’s office from January 1, 2003 through August 26, 2003, as they relate to the following questions:

·         Did the Town Clerk have adequate policies and procedures to help ensure that receipts were recorded, supported, deposited, disbursed and reported timely and accurately?

·         Were accurate reconciliations of assets to liabilities prepared on a monthly basis?

·         Did the Town Clerk and the Town Board provide adequate oversight concerning financial activity in the Town Clerk’s office?

 

Audit Findings

The Town Clerk did not have adequate policies and procedures to help ensure that all cash receipts were supported, recorded, deposited, disbursed and reported in an accurate and timely manner. The Town Clerk also did not perform monthly reconciliations of cash assets to liabilities nor did the Town Clerk adequately supervise and monitor certain duties performed by her staff. In addition, the Town Board did not help ensure that adequate policies and procedures were in place in the Town Clerk’s office. Our reconciliation of known cash assets to known liabilities at August 26, 2003, disclosed a cash deficiency of approximately $18,000, most of which relates to the sale of punch cards and permits for the Town transfer station. This report has been referred to the Ulster County District Attorney’s Office.

 

Comments of Local Officials

The results of our audit and recommendations have been discussed with Town officials and their comments, which appear in Appendix A, have been considered in preparing this report. Town officials generally agreed with our recommendations and indicated they planned to initiate corrective action.

 

End of Executive Summary prepared by Office of State Comptroller

 

In addition to responsibility accorded to the Town Clerk by State Law for collecting permit revenues, the Town Clerk, as the designated collector of taxes, is also responsible for collecting town, county, and fire district taxes amounting to approximately $2.0 million per year, which activity did not appear to fall within the scope of the recent Comptroller’s audit.

 

Town Clerk Veronica Sommer was criticized in October 2001 by then-Town Councilman Tony Spano for  “apparent mismanagement of revenue,” in a report entitled “Negligence and Mismanagement of Town Funds” that he submitted to then-Supervisor Harold Lipton and the Town Board.  That report indicated that approximately $6,000 in revenue was missing as of August 2001 and cited poor record keeping and the Town Clerk’s failure to properly report Transfer Station revenues.   Newspaper articles from October 2001 stated that Rochester town officials accused Spano of issuing a “misleading report” on how funds are handled.  On the matter, Town Clerk Veronica Sommer is quoted as saying, “There is no missing money.  I collect millions of dollars in taxes every year and get it to the penny.  I don’t think my bookkeeping is sloppy.”  Spano, a professional law enforcement officer, was defeated in his bid for re-election as Democratic candidate in November 2001. 

 

The State Comptroller’s Office routinely visits municipalities to determine if appropriate financial procedures are in place; the last audit of the Town of Rochester, which was in Spring 2001, covered the Town Supervisor’s Office for the period January 1, 1999 through December 31, 2000    Audits of the Town of Rochester dating as far back as 1989 have criticized the town’s recordkeeping, including overstatement of employees’ salaries to the State Retirement system.  This is the first audit specifically relating to the Town Clerk’s Office.

 

Town Clerk Veronica Sommer is assisted in her duties by Deputy Town Clerk Annette Rose and other alternate deputy clerks.  She has served as the Town Clerk for more than 20 years and was most recently elected in November 2001 with the endorsement of the Republican and Conservative parties.  Her current term expires on December 31, 2005.  Per State Law, the Town Clerk’s office is independent of and does not report to the Town Supervisor or the Town Board, although the Town Board can adopt legislation requiring adherence to financial procedures.

 

In a written response to the Office of the State Comptroller, Town Supervisor Pam Duke, who took office on January 1, 2004, stated that “the Town Board would work to develop internal controls for the Town’s financial affairs as required by General Municipal Law. 

 

Copies of the state Comptroller's report are available for review at Rochester Town Hall, or on the Comptroller's website, at www.osc.state.ny.us/localgov/muni/audits/2004/towns/rochester.htm.  (Daily Freeman 10/20/04)

 

 

 

Funds missing in Rochester

By:HALLIE ARNOLD  10/20/2004 (Daily Freeman)

 

An audit of the town of Rochester's books by the state Comptroller's Office found roughly $18,000 in fees for transfer station permits and punch cards missing from town coffers.

 

Ulster County District Attorney Donald A. Williams has assigned the Comptroller's audit to an assistant district attorney, who is to report back to Williams by the end of this week, according to the District Attorney's Office.

 

The Comptroller's report said the audit found "serious weaknesses in the internal control structure as it relates to moneys collected in the Town Clerk's Office." Specifically, the auditors found $18,282 unaccounted for, all but $115 of it related to the sale of transfer stations permits and punch cards.

 

"Town of Rochester officials failed to take the very basic steps needed to properly protect taxpayers' money and now $18,000 has disappeared," said State Comptroller Alan Hevesi in a prepared statement. "I urge the District Attorney to take the appropriate steps to recover the taxpayers' money and fully pursue any willful wrongdoing. I also strongly advise the Town Board to act on the auditors' recommendations to help ensure that this does not happen again."

 

In one instance, the auditors tallied the receipts of two local convenience stores and a hardware store which sold the punch cards to town residents to dispose of bags of trash at the town transfer station. In the period of the audit, which covered January 1 through August 26, 2003, the three stores reported selling $21,300 in punch cards. However, only $12,745 was deposited, according to town records, leaving $8,555 unaccounted for, the audit report said.

 

The Comptroller's report said that "inadequate record keeping and internal control weaknesses" contributed to the discrepancies not being discovered earlier, as did consolidating several tasks related to financial record-keeping, including issuing receipts, making deposits, and reconciling bank balances, as the responsibility of a deputy clerk, who is not named in the report.

 

The audit stated that the town clerk did not adequately monitor the work of the deputy clerks, did not review bank reconciliations prepared by the deputies, and did not require periodic reconciliation of liabilities with available cash assets. It also found the town board did not ensure the proper policies and procedures were in place in the town clerk's office.

 

Town Supervisor Pamela Duke said neither she nor the town board would comment on the investigation until its conclusion.

 

"I will say, however, that I will work with the town board, our accountants, the office of the State Comptroller and town employees to evaluate cash and financial procedures to ensure that there is a proper accounting of public funds, including segregation of duties, issuance of receipts for all transactions and an improvement in accounting systems for all town funds, including those that by state law fall under the responsibility of the town clerk," she said.

 

Town Clerk Veronica Sommer declined to comment on the audit.

 

Copies of the state Comptroller's report are available for review at Rochester Town Hall, or on the Comptroller's website, at www.osc.state.ny.us/localgov/muni/audits/2004/towns/rochester.htm.  (Daily Freeman 10/20/04)

 

 

October 20, 2004

DA's office investigates town clerk

By Paul Brooks
Times Herald-Record
pbrooks@th-record.com

Accord – Authorities are investigating the Rochester town clerk's office in the wake of a state audit that says more than $18,000 in town funds is missing.
Auditors from state Comptroller Alan Hevesi's office uncovered the discrepancy during an audit of town books early this year. The audit covered Jan. 1 to Aug. 26, 2003.
During the review, auditors were told the town clerk's records of money taken in at the town transfer station differed from the records kept at the transfer station. While records showed revenues of $37,921, there was only $19,639 in cash on hand or in the bank at the time. The difference was $18,282, most of it connected with the sale of punch cards and permits for use of the town transfer station.
Auditors cited several examples of sloppy record-keeping. For example, 128 receipts were missing and cash receipts were not recorded daily, the auditors said.
Auditors referred their findings to Ulster County District Attorney Don Williams in the spring. "There is a criminal investigation," Williams said. "I expect a resolution within the next two weeks."
The charges could be some form of larceny, he added.
Town Clerk Veronica Sommer answered the phone at Town Hall yesterday. "I didn't take anything," she said, referring other questions to her lawyer, Jeremiah Flaherty, who could not be reached for comment.
Supervisor Pamela Duke said neither she nor the Town Board will comment on the matter until the investigation is done. She said she did not know if she will cooperate with the district attorney's investigation. Williams said the town is cooperating.
Duke said the Town Board has not talked about the report or done anything about the recommendations. "We were told it was going to the DA's office and to do nothing, and that is exactly what we did," Duke said.
The town was not prohibited from taking action in the meantime, a spokeswoman for the comptroller said yesterday.
When asked if more money might be missing since the audit was done, Duke said, "I have no idea."

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Streamside Estates Expansion Fails to Win Approval – Again

In a revote taken at the October 19, 2004 meeting of the Planning Board, board members again failed to approve the Special Use Permit application by Michael Baum, owner of Streamside Estates (the former Tesslers Trailer Park) for an expansion from the existing 16 units to more than 60 units.  Under state law 4 votes were necessary to approve the project.  Voting in favor were Shane Ricks,  David O’Halloran (alternate member), and Robert Gaydos.  Mel Tapper was the sole member voting against the project due to the absence of Frank Striano and Tony Kawalchuk.  Planning Board Chair Nadine Carney abstained and Bill DeGraw recused himself

  

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More Storage Sheds in Store for Rochester

According to local sources, a new storage facility will be built on Route 209 across the street from CJ’s Automotive, between Queens Highway and Mettacahonts Road in Accord.  This will be the fourth such storage facility in about the same number of years, possibly making Rochester the per-capita storage facility capital of Ulster County.

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Accord Fire District Now Accepts Absentee Ballots

In a resolution passed at its last meeting, the Board of Fire Commissioners of the Accord Fire District will now permit the issuance of absentee ballots for fire commissioner elections, starting with the December 2004 election.    The Board of Fire Commissioners is comprised of five members, each serving for a five year term (with one seat vacant each year).  The Board oversees the operations and financial affairs of the all-volunteer Accord Fire District, which provides fire fighting services to nearly all of the Town of Rochester and nearby towns under mutual aid agreements.  The Fire District is a separate taxing authority, with the power to tax property owners.  Its most recent budget and tax levy, which will be collected with Town and County taxes on January 1, 2005, contains a 40% increase.

 

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Women's Studio Workshop 30th Anniversary Auction

Sunday, October 24, 1-5PM; Rosendale Recreation Center; (on Rt. 32 just South of Rt. 213 West, Rosendale)

Food, Drinks, Performance, Music, & Art!; Tickets: $10 in advance/$15 at door

Call 845-658-9133 to reserve your tickets. Featured items include artist-made chairs, local handmade jewelry and crafts, one-of-a-kind artwork, ornamental lawn and garden items, and household goodies.

Silent Auction hors d'oeuvres, drinks and the always creative, often surprising works of art donated by WSW artists and friends. Mask Performance by Shelly Wyant, a theatre performer and professor of maskwork at Bard College. Accompanying music will be performed by Thomas Workman. The artist-made masks will be auctioned.  Live Auction CAI Auctioneer George Cole leads us through bidding on 50 spectacular items including furniture, fine crafts, vacation packages and more.

For the past three decades, Women's Studio Workshop has encouraged the voice and vision of women artists. The WSW Auction is the major fundraising event to support WSW programming.

 

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Pedestrians hit by motorcycle

Three people were injured Sunday when a teenager lost control of his motorcycle on Mohonk Road, hitting pedestrians.
Police said Jared Suitter, 17, of Accord, was operating his 2000 Yamaha motorcycle going west on Mohonk Road around 5 p.m. when he lost control on a curve and steep grade, causing the motorcycle to skid into two people walking along the side of the road. Amanda Tully, 22, of New Paltz, received serious leg fractures and was flown from the scene to Westchester Medical Center in Valhalla.
John Tully, 18, of New Paltz, was transported by Marbletown Rescue to Benedictine Hospital in Kingston for treatment of leg injuries. Suitter was transported to St. Frances Hospital in Poughkeepsie for treatment of his injuries.
No tickets were issued. Deputies were assisted at the scene by Marbletown Rescue, Mobile Life Ambulance and New Paltz Police. (TH-Record 10/19/04)

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Marbletown Property Tax Reform Task Force Meeting

The Marbletown Property Tax Reform Task force meets on the third Thursday of each month at the Marbletown Town Hall at 7:00 pm. The next meetings are October 21, and November 18.  The task force is working in conjunction with residents and town officials from Rosendale, Rochester, and Wawarsing to examine property tax issues, including school district taxes.  All are welcome to attend and participate.

 

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Letters to the Editor

 

 

Dear Editor:

 

I would like to commend Board of Fire Commissioners of the Accord Fire District for adopting a resolution to provide for absentee ballots for future fire district elections.  This was an excellent decision that addressed the following issues:

 

1.                    Polling places have normally been open only during the legally mandated times of 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm on the election day (second Tuesday of December).  The limited hours make it difficult for people whose job responsibilities or transportation requirements make it difficult to vote during these hours.

2.                    The lack of an absentee ballot provision makes it impossible for many people with illnesses or physical handicaps to vote in person.  People in hospitals are similarly disenfranchised.

3.                    People who are out of town on business, vacation, military service, or other reasons are deprived of their right to vote in matters of local government by virtue of not being able to vote by absentee ballot.

4.                    The Fire District election is the only election in our town for which there is no provision for absentee ballots.  Residents are able to vote for school district elections as well as for elective positions in our town, county, state, and federal governments.  Residents are thus deprived of their democratic right to vote in matters in which they have a personal stake.

 The need for this provision has been demonstrated by the very low historical turnout at Fire District elections.  For example, fewer than 200 people voted in the December 2003 Fire District election out of 4,200 voters in the Town of Rochester (less than 5% turnout).  Turnout in the September 2002 referendum to adopt a length of service plan had even smaller turnout (3.4%).   This compares to approximately 50% for town office elections.

 

The service that the volunteer members of the Accord Fire District provides is outstanding and we are grateful for the very important safety function that its members provide to our community.  The greater participation and awareness of the Fire District’s activities that will arise through greater voter and community participation will, ultimately, strengthen the Fire District’s efforts regarding volunteer recruitment and retention.

 

Sincerely,

 

 

Zali Win

President, Rochester Residents Association

  

Legal Notices

 

G.T. Morgan Trucking, LLC has filed articles or organization with the 1Secretary of State of NY on September 29, 2004. The office is in Ulster County. The

Secretary of State is designated as agent upon whom process may be served. The address to which the Secretary of State shall forward copies of any process

is: PO Box 475, Kerhonkson, NY 12466. Filed by: Ryan, Roach & Ryan LLP (10/9/04)

 

Notice is Hereby Given, that the Planning Board of the Town of Rochester will hold a public hearing on the 19th day of October 2004, commencing at 7:00

p.m., at the Town Hall, 50 Scenic Drive, Accord, NY, on the following Application: Laraine Caliri, 2 lot subdivision/ lot line adjustment, Kirby Lane Private

Road off of Kyserike Road, High Falls, Tax Map #77.2-2-9.111, R-1 District. The above noted application and map are open for inspection at the offices of the

Planning Board and Town Clerk, Accord, NY. Persons wishing to appear at such hearing may do so in person or by attorney or other representative. Should

this meeting be canceled, the public hearing will be held by the Planning Board at a date to be determined. Kingston Freeman (10/9/04)

 

Notice is Hereby Given, that the Planning Board of the Town of Rochester will hold a public hearing on the 19th day of October 2004, commencing at 7:00

p.m., at the Town Hall, 50 Scenic Drive, Accord, NY, on the following Application: TLB Management Corp., c/o Leonard & Terry Bernardo for Site Plan

Approval for 36,000 sq. ft. roller rink, NYS Route 209 & Mettacahonts Road, Tax Map # 76.2-2-20.200, "B" Zone. The above noted application and map are open for

inspection at the offices of the Planning Board and Town Clerk, Accord, NY. Persons wishing to appear at such hearing may do so in person or by attorney or

other representative. Should this meeting be canceled, the public hearing will be held by the Planning Board at a date to be determined. Kingston Freeman (10/9/04)

 

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Rochester Residents Association Newsletter on Taxes and Casinos

 

The Rochester Residents Association recently mailed its most recent newsletter, entitled “Taxes and Casinos” to more that 3,500 households in town.  The newsletter features an explanation of how property taxes are calculated and the budget approval process followed by the School District, County, Town, Town Highway Department, Fire District, and other special taxing districts.  The newsletter also provides and update on proposed casinos in Ulster County and contains a reader survey on the subject.

 

If you did not receive a newsletter in the mail, you can down load one from http://www.accord-kerhonkson.com/NewsLetter-TaxesCasinos-May-2004.pdf.

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Voter Registration Deadline is October 8th

Mail-in voter registration forms must be postmarked by midnight, October 8, and be received by your local board of elections no later than October 13 to be valid for the upcoming election. Residents may register in-person at their county board of elections until the close of business on October 8. Residents who have been honorably discharged from the military or have become naturalized citizens since October 8, may register in person at their board of elections up until October 22. Residents who have moved to a new county are reminded that they must re-register from their new address. Those who are currently registered and have moved to a new address in the same county should notify their county board of elections in writing of their move. The New York State Voter Registration Form can be used by new voters or movers for these purposes. To download a Voter Resistration Form, visit:

http://www.elections.state.ny.us/download/voting/voteform.pdf

Completed Voter Registration Forms should be mailed to

Ulster County Board of Elections

284 Wall Street

Kingston, NY 12401

 

 

 

 

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Absentee Ballot Applications Available On-Line

The deadline for mailing a request for an absentee ballot is Tuesday, October 26th, although you may complete an application in person at the Ulster County Board of Elections Office in Kingston as late as Monday, November 1.  In addition the Board of Elections will be conducting “early voting” at the Board of Elections office during the weekend of October 30-31.  Call the Board of Elections at  334-5470 for more information.

Absentee ballot applications can be obtained online at:

http://www.co.ulster.ny.us/elections/absenteeapp.pdf  If you are unable to download the form, call the Board of Elections or write to AccordTownCrier@aol.com with your mailing address and we will mail you an application form.

 

  

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Kerhonkson Artist to show work

Kerhonkson artist Antonio Perez Melero’s works will be displayed until October 16th at the Noho Gallery at 530 West 25th Street, 4th Floor in Manhattan (www.nohogallery.com).  His work is also featured at the Gallery of the Consulate of the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, 7 East 51st Street until October 28th and at Citibank, 460 Park Avenue (at 57th Street) until January 28th. 

For more information on local artists, visit our website,

http://www.accord-kerhonkson.com/Artists.htm

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Ulster man charged with growing pot

KERHONKSON -- A Kerhonkson man  was arrested Thursday after officers found marijuana plants as big as six feet  tall growing in his backyard, police said. Members of the Ulster County Sheriff's Narcotics Unit arrested Matthew Salewski, 25, and charged him with second-degree criminal possession of  marijuana, a felony, and growing cannabis by an unlicensed person, a  misdemeanor. Following citizens' reports to police of what appeared to be marijuana plants

 growing behind his house in the Town of Rochester, the sheriff's department obtained and executed a search warrant. Deputies discovered marijuana plants growing in the suspect's backyard, so unusually large they had to be severed with an ax, police said. Also, a smaller growing operation was allegedly found in the house by investigators. Salewski was arraigned in Town of Olive court and sent to Ulster County Jail with bail set at $1,000 or $2,000 bond. (TH-Record 9/26/04)

 

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Rondout Valley plans community forums

The Rondout Valley school board is holding two forums to hear what residents have to say about academic programs and school facilities at Rondout Valley High School.
Officials also want to know what to do if community members say the high school has problems that need immediate attention, according to a press release.
The forums will be held 7-9:30 p.m. in the high school cafeteria, first on Wednesday and again on Oct. 13.
Participants will form small groups to review and discuss a set of questions. The results will help the board develop a plan to address whatever needs are identified.
For further information, contact district Superintendent Marilyn Pirkle at 687-2400, Ext. 4802.
  (TH-Record 9/25/04)

 

Rondout Valley High School building, academic needs focus of public forum

KYSERIKE - The Rondout Valley Board of Education wants to know district residents think about the academic program and facilities at Rondout Valley High School.

 

The district is also seeking views on how it should proceed if the community determines the high school has immediate needs that should be addressed.

To gather comments, the board has scheduled two public forums at the high school. The first will take place Wednesday; the second Oct. 13. Both will be from 7 to 9:30 p.m. in the school cafeteria.

Forum participants will be divided into small work groups and asked to review and discuss a series of questions. The board will use information from the forum, along with other public comments, to develop a plan to address the needs of the community.

A year ago, district residents and taxpayers participated in a series of workshops to set a vision for improving district schools.

Out of three workshops in August and September 2003, district residents and staff came up with a list of 42 projects. From that list, a number of priorities, including high school improvements, were set, said district Superintendent Marilyn Pirkle

The district is also seeking views on how it should proceed if the community determines the high school has immediate needs that should be addressed.

To gather comments, the board has scheduled two public forums at the high school. The first will take place Wednesday; the second Oct. 13. Both will be from 7 to 9:30 p.m. in the school cafeteria.

Forum participants will be divided into small work groups and asked to review and discuss a series of questions. The board will use information from the forum, along with other public comments, to develop a plan to address the needs of the community.

A year ago, district residents and taxpayers participated in a series of workshops to set a vision for improving district schools.

Out of three workshops in August and September 2003, district residents and staff came up with a list of 42 projects. From that list, a number of priorities, including high school improvements, were set, said district Superintendent Marilyn Pirkle

* Improving communication.

* Improving high school facilities.

* Implementing block scheduling.

* Creating a foundation.

* Developing a school justice program.

* Establishing a student idea task force.

* Improving reading instruction.

* Improving student nutrition.

* Creating parent/teacher workshops.

* Developing a community outreach bank.

The next step, Pirkle said, was to set up a Community School Partnership Planning Team and project subcommittees, consisting of district residents, parents and district staff.

For more information about the forum or conditions at the high school, call Pirkle at (845) 687-2400, ext. 4802. (Freeman 9/25/04)

 

 

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Legal Notices

 

Legal Notice Please Take Notice that the Town Board of the Town of Rochester will hold a public hearing regarding a Local Law Establishing A Manufactured Housing Park District Zone, Amending Requirements For The Establishment And Operation Of Manufactured Housing Parks In The Town Of Rochester And Amending Chapter 99 (Mobile Homes) Of The Code Of The Town Of Rochester on October 14, 2004 at 7:00 p.m. at the Town Hall, Accord, NY. All interested persons will be heard. By Order of The Town Board Veronica I. Sommer Town Clerk/Collector/ RMC (10/4/04)

  

Notice is Hereby Given that the Zoning Board of Appeals of the Town of Rochester will hold a public hearing on the 13th day of October 2004, commencing at 7:00 p.m., at the Town Hall, 50 Scenic Drive, Accord, NY, on the Application by Luis Valencia, Area Variance for 8 side yard setbacks, 59 Samsonville Road, Kerhonkson, Tax Map #76.9-2-2, R-2 District of the Town of Rochester. The above noted application and map are open for inspection at the offices of the Zoning Board of Appeals and Town Clerk, Accord, NY. Persons wishing to appear at such hearing may do so in person or by attorney or other representative. (Freeman 10/2/04)

 

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Planning Board Rejects Streamside Estates Trailer Park Application

In an unexpected turn of events, a motion at the September 21, 2004 Town of Rochester Planning Board meeting failed to gain enough votes to approve the expansion of Streamside Estates (formerly known as Tessler’s trailer park) to more than 60 units.  Board members Robert Gaydos and Shane Ricks as well as alternate member David O’Halloran voted in favor of the motion to approve expansion of the trailer park (owned by Michael Baum and advised by engineer Barry Medenbach).  Members Anthony Kawalchuk, Frank Striano and Mel Tapper voted against the motion.  While the vote was tied, the motion did not carry, which, in accordance with rules of procedure is the same as a rejection of the motion.  A subsequent motion by Mel Tapper to reject the application also resulted in a tie (and therefore did not pass).  It is unclear if the applicant has recourse to an appeal through the Planning Board or if he must file suit against the town under an Article 78 proceeding.

 

Planning Board Chair Nadine Carney recused herself because she is employed by Brinner & Larios, an engineering firm that was retained by the Town to review certain aspects of the planned expansion.  Member William DeGraw also recused himself in the wake of conflict of interest allegations arising from the fact that he owns neighboring property. 

Since the plan was first introduced, there have been questions about the legality of the existing 16 units in the former Tessler’s Trailer Park.  The original units were approved with the condition that they be used to house employees of the now-defunct Tesslers Hotel and that the trailers have no kitchen units.  In addition, concerns have been raised about traffic, proximity to nationally registered historic properties, location within a flood zone, impact on a Class A trout stream and a report by archaeologist Joseph Diamond and Douglas Mackey of the OPRHP, that the archaeological material found on the site (native American artifacts) is significant enough to have it qualify for listing on the State and/or National Historic Register and other very specific inconsistencies in the application.  In addition, there was significant resident opposition based on the impact that the project would have on local school and other taxes.

 

Unrelated to this specific project, but in reaction to the public opposition to trailer parks in general, the Town Board approved a moratorium against future trailer park development proposed by members of the Rochester Residents Association in November 2003, which has since been extended.  At the same time, the Town Board established a Trailer Park Committee in early 2004 to review the Town’s existing laws regarding trailer parks and to make recommendations.  This report was submitted to the Town Board and its findings are to be incorporated in a new trailer park law that the Town Board is expected to consider in coming weeks.  As the Streamside application was filed before the moratorium, it was exempt from its provisions.

 

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Final farewell at Schrade sale
Ellenville – Having already rid themselves of workers, the owners of Imperial Schrade are preparing to sell off the physical remains of their gigantic plant.
A three-day industrial auction in late October is expected to draw bidders from around the world – personally and virtually – for the company's final everything-must-go sale.
For the last time, local hotels and restaurants will host businesspeople eager to do business with a company that was once the biggest and best of its kind.
For the last time, there'll be cars in the weedy parking lot and people strolling down the giant plant's aisles.
Those aisles will echo not with the thrum of knife-making machinery but with the shouts of auctioneers and the bang of gavels. Everything must go – buffers, back-hoes and balers. Markers, millers and molders. A 2001 Chevy Impala. Plain-vanilla office furniture. The company telephone system. Fork lifts. Laser marking machines. Robots. A pair of Singer sewing machines.
Those towering metal bins – they're called dust collectors – bolted to the building's front flank and visible from Route 209 – make a bid, they're yours. Thousands of tons of stuff you might not think was even moveable, will be moved.
Maybe saddest of all, more than 2,000 reminders of the way it used to be – the firm's entire collection of knives spanning 100 years will go on the block on the auction's last day. Also up for grabs is unidentified "intellectual property," presumably trademarks or patents, that made Schrade the leader of the knife-making pack, before cheap Chinese knock-offs and fixed international exchange rates ganged up and killed the company.
People with knowledge of the private company's sorry financial condition wonder if the sell-off was made necessary by the need to pay off its principal bank debt, thought to be at least $15 million. Company officials have refused to comment about any aspect of the company's condition or plans. Requests for comment from Wachovia, the company's principal bank, went unreturned yesterday.
Meanwhile, former workers and village officials greeted news of the auction with a shrug of inevitability born of long experience. Village Manager Elliott Auerbach scanned the auction Web site and joked that he might bid on a golf cart listed there. Former Schrade employee Efrain Lopez said he wasn't surprised by the news, but when told the firm's entire knife collection was for sale, you could hear the dismay in his voice.
"Oh man," was all he could say. (TH-Record 9/21/04)

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Local Election Results

In a primary election for the Independence Party held on September 14, registered members of the Independence Party voted to select Judge Mary Work as the party’s candidate for Ulster County Surrogate’s Court judge election on November 2nd.  Work defeated Judge Paul Gruner, who has also received the nomination from the Republican and Conservative parties, 165 to 81.  Work also has the endorsement of the Democratic Party.

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 Mohonk Preserve Purchases 25 acres in Rochester

The Mohonk Preserved purchased 25 acres along the pristine Coxing Kill in the heart of the Shawangunks in the Town of Rochester from landowners Sven Hartmann and Connie Beckley.  The purchase also secures and option to purchase a conservation easement for the remaining 70 contiguous acres of the ecologically rich property by year's end.  The easement includes open fields, a stream corridor, and a section of the steep, forested Rock Hill Ridge along Clove Road.

The 95 acre transaction helps safeguard a number of environmentally and aesthetic benefits for the region, such as the protection of pastoral meadows, steep forestlands, and the vulnerable Rock Hill Ridge.  It also maintains and preserves westward views from the Mohonk Presere and the Mohonk Mountain House National Historic Landmark, not to mention conserving and protecting the Coxing Kill, the fresh stream that flows through the property. The Hartmann/Beckley transaction will be the 14th conservation the Preserve has secured.  In addition to the nearly 6,600 acres it owns, the Preserve has permanently protected almost 500 acres of land through these legal agreements. For more information visit  www.MohonkPreserve.org or call 845-255-0919.

(From the BSP 9/3/04)

 

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Annual Meeting of Friends of Historic Rochester on September 17

Annual Meeting of Friends of Historic Rochester will be held at 7 p.m. on Friday, September 17th at the Rochester Reformed Church, Route 209, Accord.  The program will include Bob Anderberg of the Open Space Institute giving a slide talk about the Open Space Institute’s  past, present and future, including historic preservation projects and protection of the Shawangunk Ridge and acquisition of the Lundy Estate in Wawarsing (saving it from being a casino).  All are welcome.  No admission fee.  Refreshments will be served.  For more information, call 626-7104.

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Stone House Day, Saturday, October 2nd.

Stone House Day Tours sponsored by Friends of Historic Rochester.  Tours of five houses will begin at the Museum betweem 10 a.m. and 3 p.m.  Museum will be open at no charge from 10 to 4 – local history displays, genealogical consultations, gift shop.  Get tickets for the Tour at the Museum.  $20 per person.  For information call 626-7104 or 687-9998.

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 Smart Bells Class

At the Marbletown Youth Center on four Tuesdays, Sept 21, 28, Oct 5, 12, Time:  9:30-10:30 a.m.

Instructor:  Paul Widerman Cost:  $10 Info:  Paul@thinkfit.com  or  call 626-7710

Note: Drop ins are welcome,  attending the first class is recommended .  Class Description: Smart Bells are revolutionary sculptural weights designed to complement the human body¹s shape and movement patterns.  Smart Bells blend Yoga, Tai Chi, Weight Lifting and Dance (Yes, it is all true!) promoting total body conditioning, flexibility and coordination.  Best of all, Smart Bells are magical, fun, effective and inspire creativity.  Users include kids, senior citizens, Olympians and pro athletes.

 

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Kerhonkson/Accord Chamber of Commerce Activities

The Kerhonkson/Accord Chamber of Commerce is having a Free business to business  networking breakfast on September 23, at the Rondout Country Club 7:30 AM to 9:00 AM. underwritten by Provident Bank in Kerhonkson. Please make reservations by calling Valerie Weaver at 626-5537 or email Valerie3w@peoplepc.com by September 13.

 

Kerhonkson/Accord Chamber of Commerce Road Rally

The Kerhonkson/Accord Chamber of Commerce is hosting a Road Rally starting at the Rochester Community Center on Saturday, October 9. The event was originally set for October 2.  The

Rally is $15 per person and includes breakfast and bbq.Trophies and prizes. Pre-register by calling Ed Lamon at 626-7921. 

Arts & Crafts vendors at the Community Center that day too. $25 per spot. For applications call Carol Dennin at Center: 626-2115 or Valerie Weaver at 626-5537.

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The Little Ones' Library Hosts Truck Day

Hooray! Truck Day is back for a fifth year! One of the best-loved and highly anticipated events at the Little OnesLibrary, Truck Day promises to excite and captivate children of all ages when trucks of all types and sizes pull into the Library's parking lot on Saturday, September 18, 2004.

The fun begins at 10 am and continues until noon with plenty of things for young children to see and do. There'll be lots of trucks like those they've read about in books to look at, learn about and explore! A dump truck, ambulance, tow truck, fire truck, sleeper cab, and conversion van are just

some of the large vehicles that will be on display. And Cowboy Skeeter, with his Hummer, is sure to be a huge crowd pleaser.  The morning will be filled with truck stories, activities, and much more truck fun!!!!! All activities are free of charge. Rain date is Saturday, September 25, 2004.

 

The Little Ones' Library, located in the education wing at the Rochester Reformed Church, 5142 Rte. 209, Accord serves children from birth to age 6. Established by Cornell Cooperative Extension of Ulster County, with help from other community partners, it provides library experiences for children in the rural Accord/Kerhonkson area.  For more information about Library

hours, storytimes and activities, please contact Marie Ulmer at 626-4112 orSue Matson at 340-3990.

 

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Legal Notices

Legal Notice Please Take Notice that the Town Board of the Town of Rochester will hold a public hearing on October 7, 2004 at 7:00 p.m. at the Accord Town Hall regarding a proposed local law amending Chapter 17 of the Code of the Town of Rochester re: the Code of Ethics. The Town Board Meeting will immediately follow. All interested person will be heard. By order of the Town Board Veronica I. Sommer Town Clerk/ Collector/ RMC (Freeman 9/6/04)

Notice Is Hereby Given that the Planning Board of the Town of Rochester will hold a public hearing on the 21st day of September 2004, commencing at 7:00 P.M., at the Town Hall, 50 Scenic Drive, Accord, NY, on the following Application: Laraine Caliri, 2 lot subdivision/lot line adjustment, Kirby Lane Private Road off Kyserike Road, High Falls, Tax Map # 77.2-2-9.111, R-1 District. The above noted application and map are open for inspection at the offices of the Planning Board and Town Clerk, Accord, NY. Persons wishing to appear at such hearing may do so in person or by attorney or other representative. Should this meeting be canceled, the public hearing will be held by the Planning Board at a date to be determined. (Freeman 9/13/04)

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 School Tax Rates Announced

KINGSTON - Trustees of the Ellenville and Rondout Valley school districts have adopted tax levies and rates for 2004-05.

In the Rondout Valley district, trustees, by a 7-1 vote, approved a $28,604,158 tax levy, up 8.65 percent from last year. The levy will increase property taxes in all four of the district's towns.

District tax rates per $1,000 of assessed property value are as follows.

* Marbletown: $28.41, up 6 percent from $26.80.

* Rochester: $33.14, up 9.5 percent from $30.25.

* Rosendale: $33.14, up 3.3 percent from $32.08.

·         Wawarsing: $765.48, up 1.15 percent from $756.81.

 

IN THE Ellenville school district, there won't be dramatic tax increases for property owners in the towns of Wawarsing, Rochester and Mamakating, according to district Superintendent Lisa Wiles.

Wiles said the $18.64 million school tax levy is up 4.5 percent, but down from the 5.7 percent increase projected when the 2004-05 budget was approved by voters in May. The reduction, made possible by additional state aid, is in contrast to a 7.5 percent increase last year.

Wiles said taxpayers with a home that has a market value of $100,000 will see an increase of $112.67 in Wawarsing, $291.03 in Rochester and $19.38 in Mamakating.

Ellenville's $34,563,158 budget represents a 6.8 percent increase over last year's $32.36 million spending plan.

The amount to be raised by taxes includes $600,000 assigned to the Ellenville Public Library and Museum.

Rondout Valley's levy is equal to the figure trustees projected during the budget process in the spring.

District voters approved a $28.6 million budget for 2004-05 in May by a 71-vote margin. Spending in the plan is up 6.38 percent from 2003-04.

Rondout Valley Trustee Imre Beke Jr. was the lone board member to vote against approving the tax levy.

Ellenville's budget was approved by voters by a 2-1 margin, which was interpreted by administrators as a vote of confidence in the district's ability to provide a quality education at a cost the community can absorb.

Wiles said the apportionment of school taxes is based on assessed valuations of each town, determined by the tax assessor, and the equalization rate, which is determined by the state.

Staff writer Steve Earley and correspondent Dianne Wiebe contributed to this report.  (Freeman 8/19/04)

 

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Ulster County School Tax Levies for 2004-2005
Ellenville $11,785,597 $12,348,282 4.77
Highland 9,610,350 10,279,797 6.97
Marlboro 4,915,591 4,843,018 -1.48
New Paltz 10,989,032 11,732,997 6.77
Rondout Valley 17,444,483 17,668,829 1.26
Wallkill 21,235,252 22,768,743 7.22

 

  

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Local Artist to Exhibit Works

Trees/Spirit, an exhibition of paintings and pastels by Accord artist Sara Harris opens at the Coffey Gallery on September 4th and continues through September 26.

Sara Harris describes her passion for the natural world as an obsession.  Once captivated by an image in nature, she absorts the interplay of color, shape, light and shadow.  Then, with her eyes closed, she feels the sweep and energy of the moment and place. It is the power of these “memory impressions,” as the artist refers to them, which make her art so personal and so moving.  In her studio, every stroke, line and tone she makes serves to capture the spirit of landscape. As she works each piece eveolves into an image that has a life of its own, quite different from any facsimile of the original landscape that inspired her.  The Coffey Gallery is located at 330 Wall Street, Kingston.  Hours are Tues & Wed 11-5, Thurs.- Sat 11-8, Sunday 1:30 to 4:30 and closed Monday.  For more information call 339-6105

 

 

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Woman's screams draw help; attackers run off

A 77-year-old Kerhonkson woman fended off would-be robbers Tuesday night with lung power and a good car horn.
Police said the victim was putting groceries into her car around 10 p.m. at ShopRite when two men tried to overpower her and take her keys. Before the men could get control of the car, the woman yelled and sounded the car horn.
The men fled on foot as bystanders were drawn to the commotion.
Three police departments responded to the scene and located James Eberhart, 42, of Brooklyn, and Richard Werry, 25, of Ellenville, hiding in nearby marsh grass.
Eberhart and Werry were charged with second-degree robbery, a felony. They were arraigned and sent to Ulster County Jail, both on $50,000 bail. (TH-Record 8/26/04)

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Tanker tragedy averted

ACCORD - When a beer bottle is thrown at the windshield of a tractor-trailer hauling 12,000 gallons of gasoline, the possibilities are frightening.

Add a second bottle, thrown at a second tanker truck with another 12,000 gallons of fuel, and the danger is at least doubled.

That's what happened about 9:45 p.m. last Friday on U.S. Route 209.

The trucks were heading south in Accord, and the bottles may have been thrown from a moving vehicle headed northbound, the trucking company's owner says.

SJR Trucking Inc. is offering a $1,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or people responsible for the potentially catastrophic incident.

"I can't believe he didn't wreck the truck," Sherry Ralph, owner of SJR, said of the driver, her husband Tim.

Tim Ralph was showered with glass from the windshield and the bottle and suffered minor injuries, his wife said.

A second SJR driver was following behind in another tanker, and the bottle thrown at that rig struck the wind visor and cracked the windshield but did not break through, Mrs. Ralph said.

She said the second driver was shaken up but nor injured.

"It was definitely Budweiser, because the label was stuck to the hood," Mrs. Ralph said of the thrown bottle.

Mrs. Ralph said she was surprised the first windshield cost just $200 to replace. But it took five hours to clean the cab of the truck because the bottle apparently was full, she said, adding that beer and glass were everywhere.

Mrs. Ralph said Ulster County sheriff's deputies took all the pieces they thought they could lift

fingerprints from.

Sheriff's Detective Debra Montgomery said pieces of the beer bottle will be sent to the state police laboratory for fingerprinting and that the investigation is ongoing.

Anyone with information about the incident is asked to call the Ulster County Sheriff's Office at (845) 338 3640. (Freeman 8/6/04)

 

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From steeple to the ground, church gets new coat of paint
ACCORD - Workers from Saugerties-based Imperial Painting and Wallpaper Contractors took advantage of of the sun Monday to apply a new coat of paint to the Rochester Reformed Church steeple. 

Church Elder Chick Logan said the painting of church and steeple are part of a major capital improvement effort.

"We are actually undertaking quite a few projects. Some have been completed, this one started and others are being planned" said Logan. "The top part of the steeple is actually fiberglass and was installed about five or six years ago. The painting of the bottom part of the steeple was done maybe 15 years ago or more. It is one of the things that has come due again, as well as the painting of the rest of the church."

New windows have already been installed in the church basement, some wall areas of the basement need replacement, new gutters are needed and at some point the area around the church will be paved.

A chicken dinner is planned at the church on Aug. 28, with proceeds to assist with capital improvements.

The Rochester Reformed Church has a active membership of about 70, Logan said. The population on Sundays during camping season may increase as campers from local camping areas frequently attend Sunday services. Church membership celebrated the 300th anniversary in 2001. The church was organized by 1695 by citizens in nearby Mombaccus who desired a place for spiritual worship. Official seminary records at the Dutch Reformed Seminary in New Brunswick, N.J., show the actual Rochester Reformed Church began in 1701.

There have been a total of five buildings on the site ,inclusive of a log worship building built about 1700.

The deed for the property was actually not conveyed to the church by the town until 1714. (Freeman 8/10/04)

 

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Rondout Board of Education fills seat vacated in June

Attorney Kent Anderson was chosen Tuesday night to fill a vacancy on the Rondout Valley school board.
Anderson, 51, of Stone Ridge, served on the board from 1994 to 1997. He was appointed to fill the post through May 2005. He has a son who is a senior at Rondout Valley High School and a daughter in college.
Anderson and Ed Jennings, a former member of the county Legislature, were interviewed for the seat vacated in June by Paul Gruner.
(TH-Record 8/12/04)

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Local Author Richard Geldard’s Book on Olympic Games

 

The Olympic Ideal   by Richard Geldard

A Tribute to the Ancient and Modern Games

 

The return of the 2004 Olympic Summer Games to Greece after 108 years signals a renewal of the original ideals of the Ancient Games. For a thousand years, from 776 BC to AD 395 the greatest athletes in the known world gathered in Olympia, Greece, to celebrate the ideals fostered by the Olympian gods.  The Ancient Games were both an athletic and a sacred event,

and in the Greek vision, the athlete represented the ideal of human perfection.

 

Even though the modern Games, now just over a hundred years old, have all but lost that original vision, there remains in the spirit of some of the contemporary athletes an awareness of that original ideal: the capacity to manifest human excellence, to discover in athletic competition

a communion with some higher truth: in effect, some transcendent ideal.

 

Greek scholar and writer Richard Geldard, PhD, has given us a warm, vivid tribute to the ancient and modern Summer Olympic Games, and has told the stories of those special champions, like Jim Thorp, Jesse Owens and Wilma Rudolph, who literally changed history with their accomplishments and in the process made us better people.

 

 From Nancy Hogshead-Makar, Three-time Olympic Champion, Los Angeles, 1984

 

"In my eight years as a world-class athlete, I competed in hundreds of other regional, national and world competitions before attending the 1984 Olympic Games.  And yet, the Olympics felt like my first competition -- the important one -- my noble purpose that made me proud of swimming 800 laps a day for almost a decade. Most of these spectators had never seen a swim

meet in their lives, and yet they were visibly stirred by the competition -- I looked out into a crowd of rapture and tears.  Richard Geldard captures the deepest truth of the Olympic Games, which represent far more than just an athletic contest.  The power of the Olympic movement comes

from the celebration of the best of humanity, the best in all of us."  Order from Amazon.com

153 pages  $14.95

 

 

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Letters to the Editor and Legal Notices

 

Dear Supervisor Duke and Members of the Town Board,

 

After attending “Imagine Rochester” it became very clear that our community wants and needs more and better communication.  Video taping all the meetings and putting them on public access TV has been a wonderful way to allow the community to keep up to date with town affairs.  However, the sound has not been as  good as it could be.

 

When attending a “Real Rochester” meeting, this subject was also brought up. A woman asked group leaders, Shane Ricks and David Ohalloran, if  better microphones or better  equipment could be used to improve the sound quality of the video tapes.

 

I don’t know if they have pursued this, but I am asking that you allow new and better equipment to be properly placed and used at the meetings.  This up-grade would most certainly be considered a community service especially since it wouldn’t cost the town a dime!

 

Sincerely,

Ruth Bendelius

 

The Rochester Residents Association has been videotaping town board and other town meetings for nearly three years.   We recently purchased a new microphone, but have been prevented from using it because of objections from a couple of town board members.  Once the town board (and other boards such as the Planning Board) allows us to place the mircrophone, we believe that sound quality will improve significantly.

 

 

"NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Planning Board of the Town of Rochester will hold a public hearing on the 17th day of August 2004, commencing at 7:00 PM, at the Town Hall, 50 Scenic Drive, Accord, NY, on the following Application: Gene Cannizzaro, Site Plan Approval for auto repair & sales, Route 209, Accord, Tax Map #69.3-3-35.1, `B Zone. Taroh Holding, c/o Russel Oliver, Oliver Pipe Organ Company, private road-Old Mine Road, off of Samsonville Road, Site Plan Approval for pipe organ repair, Tax Map #76.10-1-9.1, `1 Zone Open Space Conservancy, c/o Medenbach & Eggers, subdivision approval for lot line adjustment, Rock Hill Road, Tax Map #77.4-1-18.1, `A Zone Lawrence Friedman, c/o Medenbach & Eggers, subdivision approval for lot line adjustment, Stony Road, Tax Map #76.4-3-26.1, R-1 & `A Zone Denise Mensche Ross, c/o William Mensche, proposed 2 lot subdivision, off of Lucas Turnpike, Accord, Tax Map #77.2-2-29.2, R-1 Zone The above noted applications and maps are open for inspection at the offices of the Planning Board and Town Clerk, Accord, NY. Persons wishing to appear at such hearing may do so in person or by attorney or other representative. Should this meeting be canceled, the public hearing will be held by the Planning Board at a date to be determined. (Freeman 8/6/04)

 

NOTICE is hereby given that a license for On Premises Liquor has been applied for by the undersigned to sell Beer, Wine and Liquor under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law at, FRIENDS AND FAMILY II HILLSIDE RESTAURANT, INC. for On Premises consumption. Friends and Family Hillside Restaurant Inc., 4802 Route 209 Accord, N.Y. 12404 (Freeman 8/23/04)

 

RONDOUT VALLEY CENTRAL SCHOOL DISTRICT TAX NOTICE Notice is hereby given that the undersigned has received the 2004-2005 school tax assessment rolll together with the warrant for the collection of school taxes in the Rondout Valley Central School District, Accord, New York. Taxes will be collected form September 7, 2004 through November 5, 2004. Taxes for the Towns of Marbletown, Rochester, Rosendale, and Wawarsing will be received at Rondout Vallley Central School District Office 122 Kyserike Road or mailed to P.O. Box 9 Accord, NY 12404. If paid by Escrow Account forward to your bank at once. Payments made from October 7, 2004 through November 5, 2004 must include an interest penalty as printed on the face of the bill. Taxes unpaid after November 5, will be re-levied by the County Treasurer along with penalties and added to the county tax bill in January. NOTICE: YOUR CANCELED CHECK IS YOUR RECEIPT. Make checks payable to: RVCSD P.O. Box 9 Accord, NY 12404 Tax Collector Rondout Valley Central School District Accord, NY 12404 (Freeman 8/29/04)
 

 

Notice of Formation of CAPTAIN OMNIPOTENT, LLC, a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC). Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of N.Y. on 12/05/03. NY office Location: ULSTER County. Secretary of State is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to C/O THE LLC, 40 OLD MINE RD., KERHONKSON, NY 12446. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. (Freeman 8/12/04)

NOTICE IS HEREBY given the the Board of Fire Commissions of the Accord Fire District in the Town of Rochester, Ulster County, New York, at a meeting held on the fourth of August, 2004, duly adopted the following Resolution, subject to a permissive referendum A resolution authorizing the Board of Fire Commissioners of the Accord Fire District, Town of Rochester, Ulster County, New York to finance $271,000 for the purchase of a custom class "A" 1500 gpm Pumper with a 1250 gallon booster with an interest rate not exceeding four percent for a five year term. A public hearing notice is set for August 18, 2004 at the Accord Firehouse, Main Street, Accord, at Seven oclock p.m. until seven-thirty PM Lori Kazmarick District Secretary Accord Fire District Dated:August 5, 2004 (Freeman 8/13/04)

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Planning Board Accusations

 

In an act that is certain to raise accusations of political retribution, the Planning Board voted on July 27th (4-1, with only former Planning Board Chairman Mel Tapper voting in opposition) to refer Planning Board member William DeGraw to the Town Board to determine if Mr. DeGraw’s actions warrant review by the Town’s Ethics Board.  Mr. DeGraw, who has served on the Planning Board for eight years and is also a member of the Ulster County Planning Board, has been accused of not disclosing the fact that he owns property immediately adjacent to the controversial Streamside Estates trailer park project on Cherrytown Road.  Town ethics guidelines state that town officials shall not participate in actions before their respective boards in which they have an interest.   Mr. DeGraw has been the most active questioner of the proposed trailer park expansion (which is vocally opposed by a majority of town residents).  The Planning Board’s action appears to be a reaction to a letter the Mr. DeGraw sent to the Town Board in February 2004 in which he criticized fellow Planning Board members for a lack of training and professionalism, conflicts of interest and ignoring legal advice and existing standards and guidelines as well as “belittling fellow board members in a public forum.”

 

Disclosure required by the Town’s ethics law appears to have been followed as correspondence and distribution lists to abounding neighbors specifically listed Mr. DeGraw as an abounding neighbor, indicating that the Town and the applicant were aware of the fact that Mr. DeGraw was an adjoining neighbor.  Planning Board members have frequently participated in discussions regarding projects immediately adjacent to property owned by them.  In fact, immediately following the vote on Mr. DeGraw, one Planning Board member discussed a subdivision application pending before the Planning Board in response to a resident’s questions, until he was reminded by another member that he should not participate as a member of the Planning Board.  A review of Planning Board meetings by the editor has identified at least six other instances where Planning Board members did not recuse themselves from discussions where there was a potential or actual conflict of interest.

 

For a copy of Mr. DeGraw’s letter, please visit: http://www.accord-kerhonkson.com/DeGraw-2-5-04.pdf

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 Bottles shatter truckers' windshields

Two tractor-trailers were hit by full beer bottles Friday night on Route 209 and police are looking for witnesses.
A rig traveling south at about 9:40 p.m. Friday night when a full beer bottle was tossed into its windshield by someone in a northbound car. The windshield shattered and the driver received cuts to his face.
A second tractor-trailer, also southbound about a half-mile behind the first, also had its windshield broken by a tossed beer bottle. The driver of the second truck was uninjured.
Police are asking anyone with information about the incidents to contact the Ulster County Sheriff's Office at 338-3640.
  (TH-Record 8-3-2004)

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 Schrade shuts, 260 lose jobs
Suddenly unemployed workers feel panic
 
Ellenville – By 9:15 a.m., it was all over. A hundred years of history, at least 260 jobs.
They came streaming out the front door of Imperial Schrade Corp. Some were sobbing. Others embraced. Some walked in circles with their hands on their ears as if they'd been stunned. They were talking into cell phones, spreading the bad news.
They all clutched what amounted to their walking papers, a one-page letter from Schrade President Walter A. Gardiner that began "We regret to advise you … ."
With those words, at least 260 people, many of whom had worked at the knife manufacturing plant for 10, 20 and even 30 years, were shown the door yesterday by a once-proud, family-friendly company whose name was almost synonymous with Ellenville.
None of the suddenly jobless workers said they were surprised. After all, the company laid off more than 100 workers without so much as a warning just before Christmas last year.
But lately, there had been signs of a recovery. About 40 people who had been laid off in December were rehired in April. As recently as a few days ago, new hires were coming in the door.
But it all came to nothing. Gardiner's letter said it all:
"Your last day of employment will commence on July 30, 2004."
Gardiner blamed unspecified "difficulties" with the company's suppliers and financial institutions, as well as sluggish sales in the wake of Sept. 11. A company spokeswoman refused to answer specific questions following the announcement, including exactly how many workers were fired.
Whatever reasons the company gave, the workers blamed their bosses for the hurt they felt and the panic that was already spreading.
The kids. The rent. Back-to-school clothes. Health coverage.
Standing in the front doorway of Schrade yesterday morning was like being the first visitor at a wake.

THE LIGHTS were being shut off in one of the plant's many machine shops by 9:30 a.m. A few time cards remained in slots along the wall next to the time clock.
In the main hall leading to the employee exit, workers carried boxes and yellow ShopRite bags stuffed with personal items: family pictures, posters, sweaters and sweatshirts.
Along the wall hung the United Way fund-raising barometer. Plant employees were $500 shy of their goal of $5,000.
Outside at a shaded picnic bench, as the newly jobless workers walked to their cars and trucks, two women sat smoking and crying.
"It will be OK, Agnie," said Teresa Kalinowska, 42.
Both Kalinowska and Agnieszka Nadrowska, 36, are immigrants from Poland. Both had worked at Schrade's shipping department since their arrival in America: Nadrowska for six years, Kalinowska for five.
Both have children. Neither one knows what they're going to do.
"I'm always honest with my children," said Nadrowska, a widow who came from Staszow, Poland, with her two kids, a daughter, now 15, and a 16-year-old son. "I guess I'll tell them today I have no job."
After four years of scrimping and saving and establishing credit, Nadrowska finally bought a fixer-upper house in Ellenville. In the last two years, she's replaced the plumbing, the furnace and the roof, and painted the walls.
"The yard is small, but my kids play [in] it," she said as she took a heavy pull off her cigarette.
She started to cry again.
"My daughter, her birthday is in August," she said. "Happy birthday, yes?"
Supervisor Frank Ficsor found himself in tears when he said goodbye to the men and women in his department.
Ficsor is 48 years old. He went to work for Schrade on his 18th birthday.
"It's like a death in the family," he said yesterday.
He, like every other worker, will receive no buyout, no severance pay. His health insurance coverage ends today.
He has two kids in college.

VILLAGE MANAGER Elliot Auerbach thought more cooperation between Schrade and the village could have helped.
"I'm angry. So many people have been totally blindsided. There's no excuse for it," he said yesterday.
Auerbach said he'd met with Gardiner and other officials after the December layoffs. He told them they'd shown a lack of compassion and sensitivity.
"Obviously, they didn't listen."
Cheap foreign labor, especially in China, has long been blamed for the company's problems. But it's not that simple, according to a state expert.
The closing may have a big impact locally, but it's part of a long-standing national trend, according to Nallan Suresh, professor of management science at the State University of Buffalo.
Fixed Chinese exchange rates that make materials cheaper there are at the root of Schrade's problem, according to Suresh.
"Material costs are as much as 75 percent lower in China, so it's not just cheap labor," he said.
Rep. Maurice Hinchey, D-Saugerties, also blamed Chinese competition on Schrade's closing.
Hinchey said he was shocked by the closing, especially since he believed the company was on the verge of getting a "very significant" military contract.
Since 1990, according to the state Labor Department, more than 6,300 manufacturing jobs have disappeared in the Upper Delaware and Hudson Valley region, which includes Orange, Ulster and Sullivan counties in New York and Pike County in Pennsylvania.
Ulster has lost 1,100 jobs; Pike and Orange have lost 5,200; and Sullivan, while losing a few hundred jobs from 2000 to 2001, has remained relatively steady since 1990, according to Johnnie Nelson, a labor market analyst with the department.
Michael Cruz sat on a picnic bench outside the front door and looked into the distance. He's 60 years old, two years from retirement.
"Everything's changed," he said. "What are you going to do?" (TH-Record 7-30-2004)

 

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Police seek suspect in dog shooting

MARBLETOWN - A 6-year-old Shetland sheepdog is recovering at home after being shot in the leg sometime earlier this week and authorities are trying to find who is responsible for the injury.

Yani went missing from his home on county Route 2 on Saturday and was found on Whitfield Road on Tuesday evening by a woman who lives in the area, the dog's owner Michele Fox said Friday. She said Yani had possibly been spooked in a thunderstorm and jumped out of an enclosed area when he went missing.

"Yani was missing and when we found him he'd been shot through the leg and basically left," Fox said. "He was almost dead when we got him. He was running a very high fever, the leg was infected and he was covered in maggots." She added that Yani, who normally weighs about 45 pounds, had lost over 10 pounds during the incident.

Fox said she took the canine to the emergency clinic in Poughkeepsie, where he was stabilized before being brought to his regular veterinarian. She said he had surgery and a steel rod was put in his leg to set it. Fox said it is unknown what the extent of collateral damage will be to the leg and that it could take several weeks to know for sure. Yani meanwhile is sleeping on an air mattress in the living room and being helped up and down and in and out of the house, Fox said.

Marbletown Dog Control Officer William Warren said authorities are trying to find who is responsible for the dog's injury and prevent it from happening again in the future.

Fox, who has another sheltie dog, said Yani was a rescue she adopted five years ago.

"He had a very tough first year of life and this is sort of like the second hit that he's had," Fox said. She added that Yani is a therapy dog and an agility dog who has done therapy work in nursing and group homes. Fox said her agility club canceled classes when Yani was missing to help search for him. She added that local merchants were "wonderful" by allowing her to post pictures and signs.

"We're just glad to have him back even if he doesn't have use of the leg when its finished," Fox said.

Anyone with information regarding the incident is asked to call Warren at (845) 687-2357 or Deputy Thomas Nace at the Ulster County Sheriff's Office at (845) 338-3640. (Freeman 7/24/04)

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  State cites little league over pesticides

 

ACCORD - The Indian Valley Little League faces possible legal action over mid-season pesticide spraying of its playing field, which led to a state violation notice and, according to one mother, left her son with hives.

On June 6, the field off U.S. Route 209, owned by St. Mary's and St. Andrew's Roman Catholic Church of Ellenville, was sprayed with an unnamed pesticide. Games were held there a few hours after the spraying, and parents say one child developed hives and a small number of others developed coughs.

Sherry Ellsworth, who said her son developed hives, said she presented a letter to league Vice President Terry Ringler on June 8.

"I simply wanted to know what was used because my son had such a reaction," she said. "I ... told him no child should have been using that field within 48 hours of the spraying. Parents should have been notified prior (to the spraying) and parents should have been given the information regarding the product being used."

When league officials failed to respond, Ellsworth called the Department of Environmental Conservation. Later, she said, she was present when Ringler told an agency officer that nothing was sprayed on the field. "He openly lied," she said.

On June 17, the state agency issued a notice of violation, citing the league for applying pesticides without employing a certified applicator, failing to post notification markers and failing to provide a record of the pesticide used.

At a league board meeting Monday, Ringler said he did not lie to the officer, but suggested that anyone wishing to know the content of his statement should contact the state agency.

When board President Mike Smith questioned what the problem was, he was met with calls for him, Ringler and other board officers to step down.

"That's the resolution ... get rid of somebody because he sprayed some stuff that was used as in the past by former board members?" Smith asked. "I am a moron. Explain this to me."

Shortly afterward, the board went into executive session to discuss the alleged violation.

In the past, parents said, spraying was done with a licensed pest control applicator three weeks prior to the start of the season.

Parents said the incident has left a black mark on a league that this year had 267 players ages 5-12. Some said much of their anger stems from two coaches being discharged from their volunteer positions for unsportsmanlike conduct. Earlier, parents had presented the board with a petition with 108 signatures urging reinstatement of the coaches, who happen to be Ellsworth's father, Mike Redmond, and husband, John Ellsworth.

"These two coaches were the best," said Donna Engeleit-Cleary, who initiated the petition. "They worked together very well and were the reason my sons excelled."

Following a 45-minute executive session, Smith said he would give the public 10 minutes to speak, but said the board would not entertain discussion of the state notice, the program, teams or coaches. Ringler also declined to say more, citing legal advice.

"I personally want to apologize if it was from the spraying your son got the hives," Smith told Ellsworth. (Freeman 7/21/04)

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 Spraying will cost league

ACCORD - The Indian Valley Little League has been fined $1,000 for failing to post notice of the spraying of an herbicide on its field, failing to notify parents of players and failing to employ a licensed applicator.

The fine was levied by the state Department of Environmental Conservation, which investigated the spraying last month.

"This money is being taken from the kids," said Tom Tacti, a member of the league's board of directors. "At this point, we do not have money that can be used for the payment of the fine. We will find it somewhere.

"We aren't saying we didn't make an error and should not pay; we are saying that wherever the money comes from, it is the kids' money," Tacti added.

The fine must be paid within 21 days of the receipt of the notice, which was last Tuesday. The fine will increase to $2,000 if it's not paid on time.

The state agency halted spraying of the field June 17 pending an investigation.

Last week, Tacti told the Freeman that the league's major league field was sprayed on May 30, and was the only field sprayed. The league has both major and minor league fields on the U.S. Route 209 property owned by St. Mary's and St. Andrew's Church of Ellenville.

Tacti said the product used was an Ortho Basic Solutions weed and grass killer. He said the person who sprayed the field had been instructed by John Ellsworth, the husband of Sherry Ellsworth, who complained last month that their son broke out in hives because of the spraying.

John Ellsworth, Tacti said, was responsible for spraying the field from 2001 to 2003, typically around Memorial Day when there was a break in the schedule.

"We obviously made an error," Tacti said. "Never was the field posted prior or parents notified, and we did the same this year as has been done in the past. We sprayed during a time when there were no games and the fields were not being used.

"We have learned from this and we will make it right," he said. "My concern is one of the orders of the final DEC document indicates that all others who come after this board must comply and I want it clarified that this board is not responsible for the actions of boards that follow us." by the school district of spraying at the school over the Memorial Day weekend. She said her son has had recess on those fields and developed no problems.

Ellsworth, her father, former Little League coach and board member Mike Redmond Sr., and Tacti agree that there is a lot of unrest among adults in the Indian Valley Little League.

Asked if he thought the removal of Redmond and his son-in-law, John Ellsworth, as coaches in mid-season triggered the unrest, Tacti said discord has been ongoing for several years.

"The feeling of many in this small local baseball community is the Redmond family tried to rule the league and make their own rules and bully people who did not measure up to their expectations," said Tacti. "Last October, the community made their feelings known at the reorganization meeting. This playing season, both Redmond and Ellsworth exhibited poor sportsmanship ... in front of the kids and had to be removed as coach. They have made life miserable for everyone since."

Redmond and his daughter, Sherry Ellsworth, disagree, saying their concern has always been the children who play.

"I've seen some of this group try to work together before; they can't," said Redmond. "They self-destruct, just like they are doing now. It has nothing at all to do with the fact the Redmond family members were removed as coaches."  (Freeman (7/27/04)

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Roller Rink Plan up for Discussion

A public hearing will be held at 7pm on Tuesday (July 27) on a proposed roller skating rink and skateboarding center.

The facility would measure 36,000 square feet and be located at the intersection of US Route 209 and Mettacahonts Road. It’s being proposed by Boodle Hole Road residents Terry and Leonard Bernardo, who are seeking site plan approval.  \

“There are three disciplines of roller skating: artistic, speed and hockey,” said Terry Bernardo, a one-time nationally-ranked skater.  “Although roller skating is not in the Olympics yet, it is getting close, expecially for speed and hockey.”

Leonard Bernardo said the facility will provide a positive atmosphere for children and families and employ the most modern safety precautions.

“This will be strictly a skate and fitness site – no carnival site with bumper cars or similar activities,” he said.  “One of the ideas we are thinking about is a study-and-skate activity.  I envision this as maybe high school students come and help the younger elementary students or junior high students with homework and, once completed, then they can skate.  We hope to be able to work with the school staff around this idea.”

The Bernardos also note that besides providing entertainment for children and families, the facility

would create new local jobs. (Freeman 7/25/04)

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 Letters to the Editor and Legal Notices

 

Dear Editor:

 

This is in re: Little Ones' Library. I have sent my child to this wonderful library and I think everyone in the Accord/Kerhonkson area should at least take a look at it. I think you will find that it is a worthwhile experience and the library is worth keeping around. But, what people may not know is that there is a complimentary music program in the Accord/Kerhonkson area called Kindermuzik run by Katie Taylor of Ellenville. While it isn't free, it's well worth the expense

and is comparable to the cost of any other children's program. In Kindermusik, they sing, dance, play musical instruments, AND read books!  If we can find the support for both these programs, the children of the Accord/Kerhonkson area will be well on their way to a better education

 

Sincerely,

Bob Gartner

 

Legal Notices

Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company ("LLC") Name: DeWitt Valley View Farm, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York ("SSNY") on 6/15/04. The existence date of the limited liability company is: June 15, 2004. Office Location: Ulster County. The "SSNY" is designated as agent of the "LLC" upon whom process against it may be served. "SSNY" shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at: 84 Bakertown Road, Accord, NY 12404. Purpose: The company shall have authority to engage in the business of landscaping as well as any and all activities for which a limited liability company may be lawfully engaged under the Laws of the State of New York. (7/22/04)

CCW POOLS AND SPAS LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 4/15/04. Office in Ulster Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 438-2 Mettacachonts Road, Accord, NY 12404. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. (Freeman 7/26/04)

 

 

"NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Zoning Board of Appeals of the Town of Rochester will hold a public hearing on the 10th day of August, 2004, commencing at 7:00 PM, at the Town Hall, 50 Scenic Drive, Accord, NY, on Application by Eugene Kruchowy for 15 Area Variance for residential addition located at 1 Polyana Lane off of Upper Granite Road, Kerhonkson, Tax Map #76.3-3-2.2 and in an R-1 District of the Town of Rochester. The above noted application and map are open for inspection at the offices of the Zoning Board of Appeals and Town Clerk, Accord, NY." Person wishing to appear at such hearing may do so in person or by attorney or other representative. (Freeman 7/31/04)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Streamside Estates Public Hearing

The re-convened Planning Board public hearing for Streamside Estates trailer park on Cherrytown Road will take place on Tuesday, July 20, at 7:00 pm at Town Hall.  The public is encouraged to attend.

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An Appeal for Little Ones’ Library

 The Little Ones Library was founded by Cornell Cooperative Extension of Ulster County in 2000 to provide early educational programs to children from birth to early elementary school.  As you may be aware, there are no library, pre-kindergarten or nursery school programs in the Town of Rochester and the Little Ones Library has played an important role in providing our community’s young children with free access to books and literacy experiences.  In 2003, Little Ones’ Library served approximately 370 local children.

Cornell Cooperative Extension has been the primary funder of the Little Ones’ Library program and generous support has also been received from the Town of Rochester, the Ulster County Youth Bureau, the State of New York, foundations, individuals, and local businesses.  At the end of 2004, Cornell Cooperative Extension’s funding is expected to be severely curtailed, although Cornell Extension is expected to continue program involvement. 

 

In order to enable the Little Ones’ Library to continue its program in our town we need to demonstrate that people in our community are willing to make a commitment to ensure its continued success as the Library transitions from Cornell Cooperative Extension’s umbrella.

 

A group of individuals has formed a group called “Friends of Little Ones’ Library” in order to secure funding and volunteer support in order to enable the Little Ones’ Library to continue its efforts to prepare our community’s children for a successful school career.  Studies have shown that early exposure to reading and learning programs improves a child’s ability to perform well in school. The Little Ones’ Library is a wise long-term investment.  Early success in school is predictive of successful school completion and a better-educated workforce, leading to a stronger community.

 

We would like to invite you to an informational session on July 17th at the home of Len and Terry Bernardo.  We will tell you more about the programs offered by Little Ones’ Library and discuss ideas to make the Library a long-term fixture in our community.

 

We hope that you’ll be able to attend.  Please call Len or Terry at 626-0151 to let us know if you can attend or if you would like to help in our efforts.

 

Sincerely,

Don & Mary Lee,

Len & Terry Bernardo and Z. Win

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Two Men Die in Vehicle Accidents
TOWN OF ROCHESTER - A 30-year-old Accord man and 20-year-old New Jersey man lost their lives in separate vehicular accidents Sunday in the town of Rochester, state police at Ellenville said Monday.

Harry Conklin, 30, of U.S. Route 209, Accord, died in an all-terrain vehicle accident at a family member's residence on Old King's Highway in Accord, police said.

According to police, Conklin was riding an ATV on a mowed field when he crossed an elevated driveway made of crushed shale, was ejected from the vehicle, and landed in its path. The vehicle flipped end-over-end and struck him in the jaw and chest areas, causing massive trauma to his face, head and neck, police said.

Mark Ross, a spokesman for the Consumer Product Safety Commission, said it is common in ATV accidents for a vehicle to strike an ejected rider.

Conklin, who was not wearing a helmet, was pronounced dead at the scene, according to police.

State police Sgt. Jeffrey Radliff said a helmet, use of which is required by state law, may not have prevented Conklin's death, but it would have helped his chances of survival.

According to a 2003 safety commission report, New York has the fifth-highest ATV-related deaths of any state. Since the commission began statistics in 1982, 224 ATV-related deaths have occurred in the state, according to the report.

In a separate accident, Oscar A. Medina, 20, of Pellington Drive, Fairlawn, N.J., who was vacationing in the area, died in a Jeep accident on an unpaved portion of Trails End Road, police said.

According to police, Medina was traveling down a slight slope when the 2000 Jeep Sahara he was driving flipped over on the shale-covered road. Medina was ejected through the open top of the Jeep, which overturned once and came to rest on the driver's side door, police said.

Medina was treated at the scene for possible broken ribs and was to be transported via helicopter to Westchester Medical Center, police said. En route to the helicopter Medina went into cardiac arrest, according to police. He was then transported to Benedictine Hospital in Kingston where he succumbed to his injuries, police said.

Police said Medina was not wearing a seat belt.

A 20-year-old female passenger, also from New Jersey, was not injured in the accident, police said. The woman, whose name was not immediately available, was wearing her seat belt, according to police.  (Freeman 7/13/04)

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 Police say man set up guest to be robbed
A 27-year-old Ellenville man was robbed at gunpoint Tuesday while visiting an acquaintance at Hidden Forest Trailer Park off Mettacahonts Road.
Police said the victim was beaten and robbed, with the thieves making off with $60 and a cell phone.
Joseph I. Romano, 19, of Accord, is accused of setting up the robbery when the victim visited his family's home. Police said Romano provided a .38-caliber handgun to 24-year-old Harold Carlew and Randall Lynch, 16, both of Accord, for use in the crime.
Romano, Carlew and Lynch are each charged with second-degree robbery, a felony. Weapons possession charges are pending. The suspects were arraigned and sent to Ulster County Jail on $50,000 bail bond each.
Deborah Medenbach  (TH-Record-7/15/04)

 

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 Resignation leaves school board vacancy
The Rondout Valley school board is looking for candidates to fill a vacant seat created by the resignation in June of attorney Paul Gruner.
Gruner was recently appointed surrogate court judge by Gov. George Pataki and began his judicial duties June 23 in Kingston.
The school board will appoint a community member to fill the vacancy until the budget vote and board member election in May.
Those interested in serving on the board should send a letter with a short biography to District Clerk Lorraine Sciarrino by July 29.
The board will conduct interviews Aug. 3 and 10. The appointee will begin duty Aug. 24.
For more information, call Superintendent Marilyn Pirkle, 687-2400, Ext. 4801.
Deborah Medenbach  (TH-Record 7/15/04)

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Ulster County facing severe budget crunch
Kingston – Ulster County faces $10 million to $18 million in lost revenues and higher costs in next year's budget – and that's before department heads ask for a single penny more.
The shortfall alone could force a county tax hike of anywhere from 24 percent to 43 percent. That is based on the calculation that every $420,000 equals 1 percent on the county tax levy.
"It could change overnight," Deputy County Administrator Sheldon Quimby said of the budget shortfall, "but I don't know how."
County Administrator Art Smith outlined the glum situation in a 2005 budget packet he sent to department heads last month. "Counties are running out of funding options," he said.
The counties' share of Medicaid expenses has been and remains the biggest single expense counties face, Smith said. Medicaid costs are expected to rise 10 percent to 20 percent in 2005. For Ulster County, that translates to an extra $3.8 million to $7.5 million.
The county also faces a $4 million increase in debt payments due to rising interest rates.
Payroll costs will increase approximately $2 million and health insurance costs another $1.5 million, Smith said. Retirement costs will rise about $600,000.
The county will end its gradual elimination of its residential energy tax, paring $1.3 million from current revenues.
Add those and other lesser factors in Smith's letter, and the county is behind as much as $18 million.
On the other hand, Quimby said he anticipates county department heads will save a couple of million dollars by cutting back overtime and not filling vacant job slots. "They have been really good. They understand the last three or four years have been a problem," he said.
Then too, a new audit shows the county surplus is about $4 million more than anticipated.
The bottom line is this, Quimby said: "Right now, it looks like we are around $10 million short for next year."
Legislator Sue Cummings of Ellenville is chairman of the county's Ways and Means Committee. She'll oversee review of the budget proposal when Smith presents it Oct. 29. The Legislature is likely to adopt a budget on Dec. 2.
"I think we are in for a rough and long, hard budget cycle," Cummings, a Republican, said.
Democrat Rich Parete of Accord said the Legislature has to change its approach to the budget. "You have to make hard choices. (TH-Record 7/10/04)

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 Marbletown leaders proposed development moratorium

STONE RIDGE - Marbletown planners, Town Board members and Planning and Zoning Committee volunteers have proposed a one-year moratorium on major development within the town.

A public hearing on the proposed ban has been scheduled for 8 p.m. July 20 at Town Hall on U.S. Route 209.

"We don't want to be in the position to hurt the little guy," said town Supervisor Vin Martello. "Major development is anything over five (acres). The support comes from all involved in the planning process as well as many citizen requests. The feeling is, it is time to hit the pause button, allow the community time to catch its breath, and establish strategic directions."

Martello said the town is a community in transition and officials are attempting to meet the challenge of balancing development with conservation and preservation of community character. The core intent of the moratorium is to protect open space, Martello said.

"I agree about open space, however to me the key factor is water," said Councilman Carl Pezzino. "This is paramount in my mind. I'm looking for a recommendation on water in the future."

In other town business:

* Bids will be solicited by the D&H Canal Historical Society for work on the Five Locks Walk, which involves regrading the trail and putting a cap back on Lock 16 Gretchen Reed, a representative of the group, said it has raised $66,000 for the project, which will be matched by a state Department of Transportation grant.

Reed said initial bids came in significantly over budget and some plans had to be reworked prior to starting the bidding process again.

"If everything goes swimmingly, we could award the bid in August and construction could start in September," Reed said. "It will probably take two construction seasons to complete the work."

D & H Canal representative, Gretchen Reed, this effort began in 1999 with a request to the town of be the recipient of a New York State Department of Transportation grant. The D & H Canal Society is a not for profit organization and DOT is unable to provide grant funds to a not for profit group. $66,000 of D & H Canal fundraiser money has been set aside in a Town of Marbletown bank account showing the groups effort to match funds.

* Councilmen have agreed to contribute $500 in town funds to the Marbletown Arts Association for a planned evening honoring the town's emergency service volunteers with music, lantern making and illumination of the town park. The event is planned for the evening of Aug. 13 at Marbletown Park on Tongore Road.

* Representatives of Pace University's Law Division will conduct a two hour training on the State Environmental Quality Review Act at 7:30 p.m. July 19 at the Marbletown Community Center, Route 209. The program is designed for planning and zoning board members, but will be open to the general public.  (Freeman 7/8/04)

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 Letters to the Editor

 

Letters to the Editor

 

Dear Editor:

Streamside article...nice fiction, suggestion...report what actually occurred.  If you have no clue, as represented by Ms. Kurthy, read the minutes.  In case you are at all interested in the facts: Streamside public hearing was re-opened due to a change of the site plan by the applicant.  There was no discussion by the board or the town attorney of the March 29 public hearing prior to the motion to re-open a public hearing on Streamside.   On the other hand your story was more colorful and sounded very dramatic!   Why not add a surprise twist and make the story a real nail bitter.  Better yet, add a villian (oops, I forgot that us), I'm sure you all will "make up" a great story for the next addition without my help.

 

I'm sure its just an oversight but you forgot to mention that Spiderman II is playing.

 

David F. O'Halloran

[Editor’s Note: The article referred to was written by a Blue Stone Press correspondent for the Blue Stone Press.  The author of the letter is an alternate member of the Planning Board, the proprietor of Pinegrove Dude Ranch, and a local real estate developer.  Spider Man II is playing at the Regal Hudson Valley Mall 12

Dear Editor:

In light of the decision concerning the SEQRA review at the proposed trailer park and in light of recent planning board decisions which do not favor anything but commercial expansion and do not consider the quality of life issues in our town and the negative effects such expansion has on

town budgets and education; I would like to request that the Town Crier publish, on a regular basis,  the means by which planning board and other officers of the town are chosen so that residents can prepare themselves to change the way we are represented.

 

P.K.Perlman

Kerhonkson

 

[Editor’s Note:  The Town Crier will soon publish a primer on local government].

 

 

Dear Editor,

 

I was delighted to read in the local press about the Pattern for Progress’ 40th Anniversary conference at which Senator Clinton and Representative Hinchey received standing ovations for their progressive vision to preserve farmland and open space while encouraging “smart growth” for our beautiful Hudson Valley. Exactly what we all want! It is a confirmation of a survey conducted by the Rochester Residents Association.

I applaud Pattern for Progress’ efforts and assistance in bringing about a revival of cities along the Hudson River, including Beacon, Kingston, Poughkeepsie. The organization bases its criteria of responsible development on their own long-term research. So it came as an incredible shock to learn that their official position, as indicated by a spokesperson, is one in favor of casino development for the region. They feel that it would be a plus, assuming they don’t dominate the economy. Well, we know otherwise! I suggest they base their recommendations for our region on already existing research - impartial casino impact studies which can be accessed on http://www.casinowatch.org. They all point to the fact that casinos are a prime example of “dumb growth.” Every dollar spent at a casino is a dollar lost to the local economy. A 2001 study by two economists, Grinols and Mustard, from the Universities of Georgia and Illinois shows that for every dollar generated by the gaming industry, there is a three dollar cost to society. This figure is now closer to five dollars. The study calculated the annual cost of casino gambling in Missouri may easily be $800 million. The costs they enumerate are crime, suicide, bankruptcy, courts, prosecution, etc. Before Pattern for Progress makes any more endorsements for casinos, they should speak to people in Erie County and Connecticut, and find out why citizens have joined forces to fight all further casino expansion. The impact of three casinos proposed for Sullivan County would forever adversely affect our way of life. For one, traffic passing through Orange County, the Shawangunk Ridge and the Rondout Valley would reach epic proportions with the anticipated 23 million gaming visits per year. All this stands in direct opposition to Pattern for Progress’ mission statement which aims to “preserve and promote the social, economic and natural environments of the Mid-Hudson region...and ensure a high quality of life.” Being in a position of public responsibility and influence, we can only hope they will not cave in to casino interests.

 

Astrid Fitzgerald

Kerhonkson

 

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Legal Notice

 

"NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Planning Board of the Town of Rochester will hold a public hearing on the 27th day of July 2004, commencing at 7:00 PM, at the Town Hall, 50 Scenic Drive, Accord, NY, on the following Application: TLB Management Corp, c/o Leonard & Terry Bernardo for Site Plan Approval for 36,000 sq. ft. roller rink, NYS Route 209 & Mettacahonts Road, Tax Map #76.2-2-20.200, `B Zone The above noted application and map are open for inspection at the offices of the Planning Board and Town Clerk, Accord, NY. Persons wishing to appear at such hearing may do so in person or by attorney or other representative. Should this meeting be canceled, the public hearing will be held by the Planning Board at a date to be determined. (7/13/04)
 

LEGAL NOTICE OF ESTOPPEL The bond resolution, a summary of which is published herewith, has been adopted on June 3, 2004, and the validity of the obligations authorized by such resolution may be hereafter contested only if such obligations were authorized for an object or purpose for which the Town of Rochester, Ulster County, New York, is not authorized to expend money, or if the provisions of law which should have been complied with as of the date of publication of this notice were not substantially complied with, and an action, suit or proceeding contesting such validity is commenced within twenty days after the date of publication of this notice, or such obligations were authorized in violation of the provisions of the Constitution. A complete copy of the resolution summarized herewith is available for public inspection during regular business hours at the Office of the Town Clerk for a period of twenty days from the date of publication of this Notice. Dated: Accord, New York, June 7, 2004 Veronica I. Sommer, Town Clerk BOND RESOLUTION DATED JUNE 6, 2004 A RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING THE CONSTRUCTION OF A NEW SALT STORAGE SHED IN AND FOR THE TOWN OF ROCHESTER, ULSTER COUNTY, NEW YORK, AT A MAXIMUM ESTIMATED COST OF $100,000 AND AUTHORIZING THE ISSUANCE OF NOT EXCEEDING $100,000 SERIAL BONDS OF SAID TOWN TO PAY THE BORROWED COST THEREOF. Specific object or purpose: Construction of a salt storage shed Period of probable usefulness: 5 years Maximum estimated cost of borrowing $100,000 bonds Maximum amount of obligations to be issued: Not exceeding $100,000 bonds (Daily Freeman 7/9/04)

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Extended hours for town clerk's office


The Town of Rochester's clerk's office will now be open from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday starting June 21.
The clerk's office will also be open during lunch hours for the summer months, said Rochester Supervisor Pam Duke. Closing the town clerk's office during lunch time and on Saturdays has been a source of complaints from residents for a long time, she said.
"In September, we'll evaluate the results," Duke said. "We're not considering Saturday hours at this time."
The decision to change the hours came as a result of the recent Imagine Rochester community meetings.
Duke said that Town Clerk Ronnie Sommer will continue to be available to residents by appointment when the office is closed by calling 626-7144.

 

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Little Ones Library Funding Curtailed

The Little Ones Library was started by Cornell Cooperative Extension nearly five years ago to provide an early childhood learning program for pre-school age children in our community.  The program serves approximately 370 children each year and offers imaginative ways of encouraging young children to become interested in learning so that they will be better students when they start school

 

Cornell Cooperative Extension’s funding is expected to be curtailed as of December 2004 and a group of local residents is examining ways to obtain funding to make this program a permanent fixture in our community.  If you would like to help this effort, please contact Len Bernardo at 626-0151.

 

 

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Funeral Services for Franklin Kelder

KELDER- Franklin S., on July 1, 2004, of Accord, NY and Merritt Isl., FL. Beloved husband of Janella Seaman Kelder. Loving father of Wane Kelder and Janice Hagen. Grandfather of five grandchildren, four stepsons, ten stepgrandchildren, 13 stepgreat-grandchildren, one stepgreat-great-grandchild. Predeceased by his wife Mildred Kelder and brother S. Robert Kelder. Funeral Services Saturday at the Rochester Reformed Church of Accord at 11:00 A.M. Interment in Whitfield Cemetery, Accord. The family will receive friends at the church from 10 to 11 A.M. In lieu of flowers memorials are requested to Rochester Reformed Church of Accord. Arrangements under the direction of H. B. Humiston Funeral Home, Kerhonkson.

 

   

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Major “Streamside” Decisions made by Rochester Planning Board

Amongst the 13 applicants heard at a sparsely attended Planning Board Meeting held at 7 p.m., Tuesday June 29th at the Rochester Town Hall a few surprise decisions were made regarding the very controversial trailer park expansion application by Streamside Estates, Inc.  The first of these decisions was made at the recommendation of the Town Attorney Mary Lou Christiana, after many citizens complained and town officials then requested a review of the manner in which the Public Hearing held Monday, March 29th at the Accord Fire House was closed rather than continued, as had been announced as the adjournment of the March meeting.  Many citizens felt it was unfair and legally improper for the Planning Board to not continue the March meeting, as promised, but rather it was closed at a later meeting without allowing any continued public input.  This project has been subject to many citizen concerns related to the environment, traffic, community impact in terms of taxes, school costs and an overall sense that many have expressed throughout the Imagine Rochester workshops and other forums, that the growth of trailer parks is not in the best interest of the current town residents.  The reopened meeting is expected to take place on 7 p.m. Tuesday July 20, 2004 at the Rochester Town Hall, subject to scheduling changes that may occur as already a second Planning Board meeting has been scheduled for 7 p.m. Tuesday July 27, 2004, also at The Rochester Town Hall due to the numerous Agenda items the board is working on.   The Legal Notice will posted at Town Hall and in the Daily Freeman.  The reopened Public Meeting may end up being almost a moot point based on the second decision on this matter.   In a surprise move after the decision to reopen the Public Hearing the Planning Board went forward with a vote on the State Environmental Quality Review Act (SEQRA) impact of this project and issued what is referred to as a Negative Declaration.  In layman’s terms this means that the Planning Board agreed with the Applicant that the project will have low to minimal Environment impact therefore the applicant is no longer subject to any further environmental scrutiny.   This motion to issue the SEQRA Neg Dec was made by Shane Ricks, seconded by Robert Gaydos and a role call vote was made.  Board Members Ricks, Gaydos, Kawalchuck and O’Halloran all voted in favor of the SEQRA Neg Dec with Chairperson Carney abstaining, due to her employment relationship with the consulting engineering firm, Brinnier and Larios, PC.  Board Members Tapper and DeGraw voted against the SEQRA Neg Dec issuance with DeGraw standing in strong opposition to motion prior to the vote stating that this project has significant environmental impact.  John Sisti, attorney for the applicant Micheal Baum, owner of Streamside Estates, Inc., stated, after the passing of the SEQRA Neg Dec, “ We are very happy with the board’s action after a long careful review process looked into every question raised at the Public Hearing, they made a proper and cautious decision.”  When asked how he felt about the reopening of the Public Hearing Sisti responded, “Better to be careful than to rush the process an extra month.”  Later we caught up with Bill Degraw who had argued in opposition to the motion, DeGraw stated “After extensive research and review of this application I have come to the following indisputable conclusion that this application must be considered a Positive Declaration for purposes of SEQRA review.  The basis for this conclusion includes ground water quality and quantity, the impact on the adjacent stream and related bodies of water which are NYSDEC protected and designated as trout fishing areas which will surely be affected by the 19,640 gallons of untreated sewage which will released into the surrounding soil daily.  Additionally, due to the steep slopes and nature of the underlying strata there will be significant runoff and drainage pattern effects.”   Degraw later prepared a written statement listing the historic nature of surrounding landowners farms and traffic, noise and quality of life concerns of what he believe will, in contrast to the rural nature of the surrounding area be a urban like project changing the entire environment and character of Cherrytown.  He additionally voiced concern over with the impact in terms of cost for schools with very little additional tax to offset these significant costs and concluded with he strong concerns that the Planning Board is setting further precedent for allowing development to continue within Rochester without regard to the impact on the current residents of the community.  According to Becky Stange, Secretary to the Planning Board, the reopened Public Hearing will be limited to new issues only, the environmental impact issues are now settled. (BSP 7-2-04)

 

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Volunteers Needed for Rochester Food Pantry

VOLUNTEERS are needed at the Rochester Food Pantry to pack and hand out food at the Pantry for about an hour a day for a week every five or six weeks.  The Pantry is located at the back of the Accord Fire House.  Please, call 626-7501 and leave a message for Wilma de Jager if you are willing to help. Your neighbors will appreciate it.

 

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Love and money help ailing girl and her family

ACCORD - Sarah Mackey, 16, and Barbara Mulkowsky, 15, do what best friends do. They go swimming and shopping together, cook meals together for each other's families and, as Barbara put it, "laugh together about nothing."

But laughing has become more difficult for the girls lately. In May, Sarah, who'll be a junior this fall at Rondout Valley High School, was diagnosed with a tumor in her brain stem. And the tumor is dangerously close to sensitive areas, such as the optic nerve.

So Barbara has done what best friends do, forgoing swimming or shopping to accompany Sarah to doctor visits.

"She keeps me calm," Sarah said of her friend of five years.

Barbara's goodwill and that of the Rochester Youth Commission - which has started a benefit fund for Sarah - has helped Sarah and her family though an uncertain time, said Sarah's mother, Joann Conklin.

UNTIL a biopsy, scheduled for July 16, is completed, doctors cannot say whether Sarah's tumor is malignant.

"All we know is it's a tumor and it doesn't belong there," Conklin said. "The fear of not knowing what it is besides knowing it's a tumor - it's just overwhelming."

Compounding the uncertainty are the costs associated with the numerous trips to the hospital in Albany, about 70 miles from Accord, and the fact that Conklin, a single mother of eight - four of whom live with her - had to quit her cleaning job at Camp Epworth in Stone Ridge in order to care for Sarah.

THE YOUTH Commission's offer of help caught Conklin by surprise, and she said she "felt funny" when she heard about it two weeks ago.

"I'm just very prideful," she said. "I don't ask for help."

But the writer of an anonymous letter did ask the commission for help.

The hand-written letter explained the family's plight and notes that while insurance was covering the medical costs, other expenses were straining the family.

"We are asking the community to come forward together in any way," the letter stated.

THE ROCHESTER Youth Commission, which runs free-of-charge after-school and summer programs for children ages 9-18, answered the call.

"We felt they just really needed help," said Valerie Weaver, an administrative assistant with the commission. "It's a family that that needs prayers as well as gas cards."

Weaver said the commission seeks to minimize the family's worries at a worrisome time. For example, she said, Conklin shouldn't have to be worry about long-distance phone charges when she's checking in with Sarah's siblings from Albany.

AFTER ALL, Sarah, who aspires to attend the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, is has enough worrying to do about naming the restaurant she plans to open.

"I have no idea," she said, when asked what she would call her restaurant, which would serve everything, but specialize in potato omelets. "I've been thinking about that for a long time, but I'm still trying to think of that."

Monetary donations (and, if you're creative, suggested restaurant names) may be sent to Sarah Mackey Benefit Fund, c/o Key Bank, P.O. Box 216, Kerhonkson, N.Y. 12446. Donations also may be made in person at any Key Bank location. Grocery store gift certificates, gas cards and phone should be sent to Sarah Mackey Benefit Fund, c/o Town of Rochester Youth Commission, P.O. Box 65, Accord, N.Y. 12404. Freeman (7/1/04)

 

 

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Peg Leg Bates

IN HIS lifetime, Clayton "Peg Leg" Bates was a world-renowned tap dancer and entertainer, local resort owner and dedicated family man.

Now, 5-1/2 years after his death, his life story is the subject of a new children's book called "Knockin' On Wood," by writer and artist Lynne Barasch. The book was released in May by New York City publishers Lee & Low Books.

"I just hope that people read the book, and realize my father was a determined man, someone who didn't let anyone hold him back," said Bates' daughter, Melodye Bates-Holden of Kerhonkson.

BARASCH first learned about Peg Leg Bates from her daughter, Cassie, whose tap teacher, like many in the field, admired Bates' work, Bates-Holden said. The story stayed with Barasch, and she eventually decided to make Bates' life the subject of a children's book.

The book chronicles Bates' life from his days as a child in South Carolina, where he would dance on the streets and at the local barbershop for spare change, to the day when, at age 12, he lost part of his left leg in an accident at a cottonseed mill and had to use a wooden peg in its place. From there, it follows Bates' career from his early days performing in blackface at vaudeville shows to his rise to fame, which included performances for the king and queen of England in the 1930s, to the opening of the Peg Leg Bates Country Club in Kerhonkson, which was in business from 1951-89.

IN A recent interview, Barasch said she found inspirational the story of how Bates, who died in December 1998 at age 91, overcame the loss of his leg, crushing poverty and segregation to succeed.

"If I had to single out one thing that this story says to me it would be the pursuit of an art has the power to carry you through life no matter what obstacles may present themselves," she said. "There is no finer endeavor."

BATES-HOLDEN said the publisher contacted her last September to get her approval for the book. "He would be very honored," she said of her father. "He always wanted to do a children's book himself."

Bates-Holden said she wants people to read the book in order to learn more about her father. She especially hopes the book reaches children, who Bates loved and spent much of his time with in later years, visiting local and inner-city elementary schools to talk about overcoming adversity.

"People see his signs along the 35 miles of (U.S. Route) 209, the Clayton 'Peg Leg' Bates Memorial Highway, and people always tell me that their kids ask them, 'Who's that? What did he do? Why is his name on the sign?'" Bates-Holden said. "I thought it would be nice for the area elementary schools particularly to have this information available to them."

LEE & LOW is an independent publisher of children's books, specializing in multicultural themes. Since being founded in 1991, the firm has published more than 100 titles.

Jennifer Stevens of Lee & Low said the initial printing of "Knockin' On Wood" was 5,000 copies, which are being marketed primarily to libraries and schools, but also to the African-American community and to specialty markets related to tap dancing.

"The response has been very good," Stevens said. "The book received a starred review from the School Library Journal, the school and library go-to publication, and has also gotten some favorable reviews from other publications."

BATES-HOLDEN said word about the book has begun spreading around the community.

She said a woman who attended her father's church told her Peg Leg would be smiling down at her and the book of his life. "I said, 'Well, if he doesn't know already, he will, because it's the first thing I'll tell him the next time I see him,'" Bates-Holden said.

"Knockin' On Wood" can be ordered online at leeandlow.com, amazon.com and Barnes & Noble's Web site, bn.com. (Freeman 6/20/04)  

 

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Imagine Rochester a Huge Success

Imagine Rochester, a visioning workshop held on May 15th and sponsored by the Town Board, was a huge success.  More than 80 people representing all parts of the community attended the all day session to discuss the challenges that face the town and to talk about ideas on how the town might begin to address these issues in a positive and constructive way.    Attendees included Supervisor Pam Duke, Councilmen Francis Gray and Tom Ryan, Highway Superintendent Wayne Kelder, ZBA Chair Marijane Knudsen and members Betty Kawalchuk and Brian Belile, and Planning Board member Bill DeGraw.

 

Led by facilitators Ted Fink and Michelle Grieg, the group broke out into smaller focus groups on: (a) economic development, (b) rural character, (c) culture and recreation, (d) communication, and (e) environment to discuss ideas on how to strengthen our community. 

 

The group identified several areas of concern that echoed the results of town-wide surveys conducted in 1968, 1989, and 2001, which included the desire for the preservation of open space and preserving the rural atmosphere of the town (vs. “suburbanization”).  Other issues that were raised as being extremely important were an improvement on the enforcement of existing zoning laws, and decreasing the permitted housing density from the present one acre per residence.  The most popular idea presented was the opening of the Town Clerk’s office during lunchtime and on Saturday mornings, a topic that the Town Board is expected to discuss in the near future.

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Rondout Valley plan adopted by 71 votes

KYSERIKE - Rondout Valley school district voters adopted a 2004-05 budget Tuesday by a 71-vote margin.

Voters also seated an incumbent trustee and two newcomers on the Board of Education. The three were unopposed after a fourth candidate dropped out.

The $48.4 million budget, which passed by a vote of 1,092 in favor to 1,021 against, reflects a 6.38 percent in district spending over the current year. District officials had estimated the tax levy increase at 8.65 percent, to $28.6 million, but said the figure cannot be accurately predicted because a state budget and education aid package has not yet been adopted by the state Legislature.

"The numbers were close, but it really does not reflect the number of voters in the district," said Maureen Sheehan, the school board vice president and chairwoman of the district's budget committee. "This budget passed because the communication is clearer and provides a better understanding of the budget."

The original ballot showed four district residents vying for three openings on the Board of Education, but Wally Nichols dropped out of the election.

Incumbents Tavi Cilenti and Nancy Taylor, the current board president, did not seek re-election.

ncumbent Holly Elliott led the field with 1,394 votes, followed by newcomers Pamela Longley with 1,249 and Irme Beke with 1,077.

This year, the district opened the polls earlier than usual, at 6 a.m., a response to requests heard by the district's budget committee as it toured the district.

There were 23 votes cast between 6 and 7 a.m., eight of those by district staff, officials said.

"Prior to the development of the budget we went to the public and the public let the board know their priorities," district Superintendent Marilyn Pirkle said. "The budget subcommittee really listened to what the public had to say and tried to incorporate that information during the development of this budget.

"I understand there weren't great numbers at 6 a.m., but we had a baker who was just getting off work, and others going to work," Pirkle said. "I think it takes a couple of years of doing this to really say how effective opening the polls that early is." (Freeman 5/19/04)

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 Animal Abuse Case in Rochester

 

TOWN OF ROCHESTER - An emaciated dog who was found on Stony Kill Road has been returned to her owner, though charges are still pending in town court.

 

The 14-year-old female boxer mix was found on Stony Kill Road on April 29 and turned over to the dog control officer who in turn brought the canine to the Kingston Animal Hospital. Her owner, James A. Baracca, 54, of 8 Stony Kill Drive, Accord, was charged April 30 by Ulster County sheriff's deputies with misdemeanor failing to provide proper sustenance to an animal.

Veterinarian Arnold Rugg said Friday that the owner of the dog came to pick her up Monday night after calling from the town of Rochester courthouse. He said the owners were told the canine needs to be on a high-protein diet and antibiotics. Rugg added that the owners seemed to have missed the dog when they came to pick her up. He said they hugged her and cried over her.

"The people were very, very, very emotional about getting the dog back," Rugg said.

When the dog was first brought to the animal hospital she only weighed 24 pounds and had to be carried in and out by staff. There was also some question of whether she would survive.

Last week Rugg said he had run tests on the animal and could find no other cause for the dog's emaciated condition than starvation. He added at that time that the dog had Lyme disease.

On Monday before the dog was picked up, Rugg said she had gained two pounds and was beginning to walk.

"I can only hope she continues to improve," Rugg said Friday. He said the owners are going to have their veterinarian care for the dog and to that end his office sent the canine's file to the other vet.

Deputy Tom Nace, who brought the charges against Baracca, said Friday that charges are still pending in town court. He added that he did not know if the judge had released the dog and would be checking into that.

Assistant District Attorney Peter Graham, who will prosecute the case, said he will go to court for the first time on June 1. He said the case will be in front of Judge Ronald Keillor.

"This is a very serious case," Graham said. "The (Ulster County) District Attorney's Office wants to prosecute it fully." He added that if Baracca is convicted the District Attorney's Office will seek substantial jail time for the man.

Graham also said he received a letter from the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) in regards to the case. In the letter PETA asked that Graham "take every measure necessary to ensure that (Baracca) is barred from all future contact with animals and to immediately find and seize any animals who remain in his charge."

The prosecutor said he plans to recommend in court that any animals Baracca has in his custody be removed.

Baracca and the judge who handled his appearance in town court on Monday could not be reached for comment.  (Freeman 5/15/04)

 

 

Dog taken from owner again in alleged animal abuse case

 

TOWN OF ROCHESTER - The emaciated dog who was found on Stony Kill Road last month has again been removed from her owner, while the veterinarian caring for her said Lyme Disease and age could have contributed to the canine's debilitated condition.

 

 

The 14-year-old boxer-pit bull mix was returned to the Kingston Animal Hospital earlier this week and then placed in a foster home, Veterinarian Arnold Rugg said Friday. He said the dog continues to improve and has gained five pounds since the first time she was brought to him. The dog now weighs 29 pounds, Rugg said, adding that she is starting to show signs of interest in what is going on around her and acting more like a dog should.

The dog's owner, James Baracca, 54, of 8 Stony Kill Drive, Accord, was charged April 30 by Ulster County sheriff's deputies with misdemeanor failing to provide proper sustenance to an animal. Following a court date on May 10, Baracca went to the animal hospital and reclaimed his dog.

The attorney prosecuting the case then asked a judge this week to return to the dog to the veterinarian's care, a move the judge approved, according to Jill Shufeldt, the dog control officer for the towns of Rochester, Rosendale, New Paltz and Esopus. She added that charges are still pending against Baracca.

The dog, whose name is Sadie according to a friend of the Baraccas, was found on April 29 and brought to Shufeldt who in turn brought her to the Kingston Animal Hospital. When she was brought to the animal hospital she was emaciated and found to have Lyme Disease and was reportedly dehydrated.

Rugg said Sadie's age and Lyme Disease could have contributed to her condition but those are things that should have been treated medically. He said he suspects the family did not know the dog was sick. Rugg went on to say that his practice deals with a lot of senior animals and that at times people do not realize their animals are sick. He said part of his job is to educate people to know what to look for.

When Sadie was first brought to Rugg he ran tests on her and said he could find no other cause for her condition other than starvation.

"I feel kind of bad for the dog and the people and the situation," Rugg said.

Baracca is scheduled to return to Rochester Town Court on June 1. He could not be reached for comment as of Friday night.  (Freeman 5/22/04)

 

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Off-duty officer injured on bike trail

 
Town of Rochester
East Fishkill officer injured on bike trail

An unidentified East Fishkill police officer was flown by helicopter to the hospital yesterday after a bicycle wreck at Minnewaska State Park.
The male officer, who park officials didn't name, was with another officer biking along the Millbrook Carriageway trail in the mountainous state park, according to those familiar with the crash.
Just after 3 p.m., the officer apparently lost control of his bicycle and crashed onto the rocky terrain. He suffered severe head and neck injuries and punctured his side, sources said.
The officer was flown by helicopter from the crash scene to Westchester Medical Center.
East Fishkill police confirmed the crash but did not release any information about the officer.
  (TH-Record 5/29/04)

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Ulster County Jail overbudget

 

KINGSTON - Ulster County's new Law Enforcement Center could cost up to $21 million more than originally planned, county lawmakers were told on Thursday.

Covering the added cost will force the county to borrow money, but Democrats in the Legislature, who are angered by the overrun, could block such a move because they hold 16 of the body's 33 seats and 22 "yea" votes are needed to authorize borrowing.

The county initially budgeted $71.8 million for the Law Enforcement Center, which will house the county jail and sheriff's office. But on Thursday afternoon, Richard Scaife, vice president of Bovis Lend Lease, the firm managing construction of the Law Enforcement Center, told members of the legislative committee overseeing the project that the county probably will have to spend an extra $5.8 million to complete construction and up to $15.2 million to cover claims filed by contractors who have incurred additional costs due to a one-year delay in the project's completion.

"This was a much more complex facility structurally and everything else," Scaife said. "It had a lot more changes that occurred during the course of construction."

Scaife said that based on claims already filed and his conversations with contractors, $15.2 million would be the absolute cap for claims the county may have to pay. Of that, about $3 million is for legal fees.

Legislature Chairman Richard Gerentine, R-Marlboro, said the county is looking into hiring an attorney who specializes in such claims to advise the county about any counterclaims it may be able to file.

"Hopefully we'll be successful in recouping at least most of our costs above what we authorized for this project," he said.

Of the $5.8 million in additional construction and "soft costs," roughly $1 million is for "enabling" expenditures, such as buying the Albert Street site for the building, preparing the site for construction and hooking up water, sewer and utilities.

Another $2 million is for a contingency fund to cover unanticipated expenses during the course of construction. (The original contingency fund already has been used up.) And the remaining $2.8 million is for construction-related costs, such as legal expenses, materials testing and fees for the architect and Bovis Lend Lease.

Albert Meyer, R-Wallkill, who chairs the Legislature's Criminal Justice/Public Safety Committee, called the overrun numbers "shocking" but said the county probably will have to spend the extra money, particularly because of dramatically escalating costs to board out inmates at other jails because of overcrowding at the county's current facility on Golden Hill.

Legislature Democrats, who have long criticized the Law Enforcement Center project, say the overruns and anticipated claims are the Republican leadership's closed-door management of the project coming home to roost.

Richard Parete, D-Accord, said the Legislature's GOP leaders - including Gerentine, Majority Leader Michael Stock of Woodstock and Ways and Means Committee Chairwoman Susan Cummings of Ellenville - should resign.

"We brought this up two months ago, and they laughed at us and said we were playing politics," Parete said. "If we were playing politics, they've been playing incompetence."

Peter Kraft, D-Glenford, said he called the state Attorney General's Office after Thursday's committee meeting to look into whether a commission with subpoena power could be established to investigate the cost overruns.

"This is just out of hand, and it could get uglier," he said.

Also on Thursday, Scaife said construction remains on track for completion by January 2005 but that the new jail may not open until two months after that because it could take that long for the state Commission of Corrections to authorize occupancy.  (Freeman 5/21/04)

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Bank tellers staged Ellenville robbery, police say

By Jessica Gardner
Times Herald-Record
jgardner@th-record.com

Town of Wallkill – Shifty tellers hoping to cover up their own embezzlement staged a robbery Tuesday at the Fleet Bank in Ellenville that netted roughly $250,000, police said.
At a news conference in Wallkill yesterday, authorities said Venetia Perkins, 24, of Ellenville, and Alecia McCarthy, 33, of Wurtsboro, hatched the plot after hearing about an upcoming bank audit. The pair feared the audit could uncover the fact that they'd been skimming money from the bank's till for months, said state police Lt. Kevin Costello.
Police say that's when Lawrence Lipscomb, 43, of Napanoch, entered the picture. McCarthy and Perkins allegedly offered cash to Lipscomb to help pull off the heist. Police wouldn't say how much money was offered to Lipscomb, who was convicted of selling cocaine in the early '90s.
Then, police say, Harvey Ducker, 21, of Ellenville, and his sister, 26-year-old Nancy Ducker of Napanoch, were brought into the conspiracy.
Ellenville police Chief Philip Mattracion said this is how the staged robbery took place:
Harvey Ducker showed up at the bank just before 9 a.m. wearing a mask. He grabbed Perkins in the parking lot before dragging her inside, seemingly against her will.
From there, he rounded up the other bank employees, snatched the cash and took off. His sister, Nancy, was waiting for him in the getaway car, a green Mitsubishi, not far from the bank.
Although not present during the robbery, Lipscomb did most of the planning, police said.
Costello said the plan unraveled when at least one of the two tellers involved came clean to police during questioning.
Police conducted search warrants late Tuesday, recovering about $250,000. Mattracion said it was unclear how much of the cash was taken in the robbery and how much had been embezzled before the robbery.
Ducker and his sister were charged with second-degree robbery. The pair and Lipscomb were also charged with fourth-degree conspiracy. Perkins and McCarthy were each charged with second- and third-degree grand larceny. All the charges are felonies.
All five suspects were arraigned early yesterday morning and sent to Ulster County Jail in lieu of $75,000 bail. Their next court appearance is scheduled for Tuesday.
State police and Ellenville police were assisted with the investigation by the Ulster County Sheriff's Office, the FBI and the Ulster County district attorney's office.
Mattracion said this was the first bank robbery in Ellenville since 1950. (TH-Record 5/20/04)

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Legal Notices

NOTICE OF FILING OF P.J.M. HOLDINGS, LLC 1. The name of the limited liability company is: P.J.M. HOLDINGS, LLC. 2. The date of filing of the articles of organization with the Secretary of State was: March 30, 2004. 3. The county within this state in which the office of the limited liability company is to be located is: ULSTER. 4. The Secretary of State is designated as agent of the limited liability company upon whom process against it may be served. The post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the limited liability company services upon him/her is: 85 Baker Road, Kerhonkson, New York 12446. 5. This business has been formed to: engage in any lawful act or activity for which limited liability companies may be organized under the LLCL. (Freeman 5/14/04)

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Friends of Historic Rochester History Day

ACCORD - The house at 12 Main St. didn't start out there.

The building was constructed along the D&H Canal around 1870 and was moved during the early 1900s to make way for train tracks.

That historical tidbit - and a wealth of other information - exists in the Friends of Historic Rochester Museum and Library in the newly renovated house at 12 Main St. Friends members opened the museum to the public on Saturday and proudly showed off more than five years of hard work and the culmination of a longtime dream of the late Percy Gazlay.

"WE WERE able to acquire this house as a tax sale. It had stood as an orphan for many years," said Alice Cross, vice president of Friends of Historic Rochester and the local historian. She said a family named Hendrickson once lived in the building, but "we don't know who the original owner of the house was at the canal location."

"There were dates and writing on some of the rafters and beams, and that is how we know for sure where the house came from."

EXHIBITS on display Saturday included collections of photos of buildings and events, items of clothing and genealogical documents. Retiring Surrogate's Court Judge Joseph J. Traficanti Jr. was one local resident who claimed a connection to the display of photos.

"I started my legal and judicial career here in the town of Rochester, and its only fitting that I came back here to end it," he said. "The town of Rochester has such a rich history. ...

"My first law office here had a small gas heater and no telephone," the judge added. "After the store closed across the street, I would go over and use the phone booth. ... I didn't want people to know I didn't have a phone in the law office I had opened."

FRIENDS of Historic Rochester President Alice Schoonmaker told passersby about the signature quilts that were sewn by the late Gazlay and embroidered by Rita Lunden.

Schoonmaker said the displays will be changed periodically and the historic preservation group will continue to seek donations of articles from the immediate area.

HAVING logged more than 800 hours of volunteer time at 12 Main St. - both in construction and compiling genealogies - Richard Rider recalled the construction on Saturday.

"This original front of the house is the part of the house that was moved from the canal area," he said. "Our group put on the addition where the kitchen is.

"It was very interesting to work with the original beams and rafters," he added. "Two of the original beams were big cedar beams. The story goes they were the gutters on the house when it originally stood along the canal. If that's true ... those were some heavy gutters!"

Asked what the biggest challenges were, Schoonmaker had to think for a moment, then talked about the building being simply a shell with no water or electricity when the project began. The ability to renovate it came from volunteer work, private donations, fund-raisers and some grant money, she said.

WITH THE first floor now finished, the building will be open to the public on weekends, except during special events. Both Schoonmaker (845-626-7104) and Cross (845-687-9998) can be contacted about special group appointments as well as genealogy research.

Friends of Historic Rochester meets on the third Monday of each month at 12 Main St., Accord, and new members are welcome, Schoonmaker said.  (Freeman 5/9/04)

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Starved Dog Struggles to Survive

 

TOWN OF ROCHESTER - While a 54-year-old Accord man is facing charges after his emaciated dog was found on Stony Kill Road last week, it remains to be seen whether the female boxer mix will survive, according to the veterinarian caring for her.

James A. Baracca, of 8 Stony Kill Drive, was charged last Friday with torturing, injuring and failing to provide proper sustenance to an animal under the state's agriculture and markets law, Ulster County sheriff's deputies said. Deputies said Baracca was released on an appearance ticket to return to Rochester Town Court next week.

Baracca was charged after a dog was found April 29 dehydrated and starved on Stony Kill Road in Accord. The dog was found by a woman who turned the animal over to Jill Shufeldt, the dog control officer for Rochester, Rosendale, New Paltz and Esopus. Shufeldt in turn brought the dog to the Kingston Animal Hospital, where she has remained ever since.

Veterinarian Arnold Rugg said Wednesday that the dog, which is about 7 years old, is extremely emaciated and has not gained weight despite the fact that she is eating. He said tests done on the dog indicate she has Lyme disease and minor anemia, but no other abnormalities, like heart or kidney failure, were detected.

Rugg said he could not find any other cause for her emaciated condition other than starvation.

"It's shocking, the condition she is in," Rugg said. He said the dog's skeleton is visible through her coat.

Up until Tuesday the staff was carrying the dog around, but she has now started being able to walk weakly, Rugg said. He said, however that she is not gaining weight well and it's not definite she will recover.

"This is going to be a long process," Rugg said of the dog's recovery effort. He added that she is on medication for the Lyme disease and arthritis and he has several people interested in fostering the dog when she is healthier.

Shufeldt said Baracca called her after he saw an article in the Freeman on the dog being found.

Shufeldt said she obtained a warrant to hold the dog until a judge decides whether or not to return her to her owner.

"Basically all the staff loves her there (at the animal hospital) and are trying to help her pull through," Shufeldt said.

Shufeldt said she obtained a warrant to hold the dog until a judge decides whether or not to return her to her owner.

"Basically all the staff loves her there (at the animal hospital) and are trying to help her pull through," Shufeldt said. (Freeman 5/6/04)

 

[Editor’s Note: This the latest in a series of serious animal abuse cases in the Town of Rochester in the past three years.  Prosecutors have had limited success securing convictions in Rochester’s Town Court.]

 

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 Candidate Statements for Rondout Valley Central School District Board of Trustees

Three seats (four candidates)  three-year terms
Polling times and place: 6 a.m.-9 p.m. May 18, Rondout Valley High School Gym
Because of bus arrivals and dismissals, do not come to vote between 7:15-7:45 a.m. and 2-2:30 p.m.

Imre Beke Jr.
Kerhonkson
Age: 34
Personal: Married, three children.
Education: Law degree from Eotvos Lorand University, Budapest, Hungary.
Occupation: Manager of Catskill Gateway Real Estate office.
How many years have you lived in the school district? Since age 7, with college years in Hungary.
Prior school board experience? First time running.
Do you have children in the district? Yes.
Why are you running? I believe there are two major problems with the schools. The amount of money spent is far too high. People are losing their home over this. That in itself is a sign that the expenditures are out of control.
Second, the quality of education throughout America is terrible. Having lived in Europe, I know for a fact that it is possible to have a good educational system for far less money that's being spent. The U.S. is the top educational spender per child. We spend an average of $10,000 per child. New York averages $13,000 per child. Germany, the number two spender in the world, spends $5,000 per child. Even if a German student leaves school after eighth grade, they have more of an education than those who leave after high school in the U.S.

Holly Elliott (incumbent)
Kerhonkson
Age: *
Personal: *
Education: Undergraduate and master's degrees from SUNY New Paltz, doctor of chiropractic from Palmer Chiropractic University, Davenport, Iowa.
Occupation: Chiropractor.
How many years have you lived in the school district? *
Prior school board experience? Completing first term as a school board member.
Do you have children in the district? *
Why are you running? I'm very proud of my involvement in this community and especially the time I've spent with my colleagues on the school board at Rondout Valley. My participation in the New York State School Board Association's workshops in fiscal management, school governance, policy and decision making have been invaluable in developing me into a successful board member.

Pamela Longley
High Falls
Age: 31
Personal: Single, one child in middle school.
Education: Graduated from Marist College in 1999.
Occupation: Paralegal with Miller, Weiner and Associates in Kingston.
Years in the district: Three.
Prior school board experience? No.
Do you have children in the school district? One in middle school.
Why are you running? Because I care. It's my responsibility to do this. I can't change things on the national level, but this is my way to be active and help on the local level.
Rondout is a good district. I like the district. I'd like to see that every child graduates from Rondout with the love of learning within them. A good foundation is essential to their individual success and also for the nation as a whole.

Wally Nichols
Kerhonkson
Age: 37
Personal: Married.
Education: John Jay High School, South Salem, N.Y., 1985; Brown University, English major (1989), teaching assistant (1989-90).
Occupation: computer consultant and screenwriter.
How many years have you lived in the school district? Four.
Prior school board experience? None as a member.
Do you have children in the district? No.
Why are you running? We owe it to the young students of this diverse community to provide the best possible public schools. It is in their interest and it is in our interest as parents and/or taxpayers. I want to help the board of education work with the teachers, the administration, the community and the students to create an educational system that will take kids from kindergarten to 12th grade and leave them on the doorstep of adulthood educated, confident and well prepared for a lifetime of learning and success. I will help, if I can, by using my experience as a public school graduate, a business owner, an artist and a good listener.

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Legal Notices

 

"NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Planning Board of the Town of Rochester will hold public hearings on the 18th day of May 2004, commencing at 7:00 PM, at the Town Hall, 50 Scenic Road, Accord, NY, on the following Applications: Geoffrey Greene, Site Plan Approval for change to approved site plan for restaurant w/outdoor picnic area and pavilion, 5125 Route 209, Accord, Tax Map #76.2-2-49, `B & `F Zone Yankee Barn Development, Inc, c/o Bryan Zelnick for Subdivision Approval for boundary line adjustment at Mohonk Views Subdivision, Route 209 & Bank Street, Accord, Tax Map# 77.1-1-27.21 & 27.23 and in an R-1 District of the Town of Rochester. The above noted applications and maps are open for inspection at the offices of the Planning Board and Town Clerk, Accord, NY. Persons wishing to appear at such hearings may do so in person or by attorney or other representative. Should this meeting be canceled, the public hearing will be held by the Planning Boad at a workshop meeting at a date to be determined at 7:00 PM, at the Town Hall, Accord, NY." (Freeman 5/11/04)

 

"NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Planning Board of the Town of Rochester will hold public hearings on the 18th day of May 2004, commencing at 7:00 PM, at the Town Hall, 50 Scenic Road, Accord, NY, on the following Applications: Barbara Podejko, Special Use Permit for 2nd mobile home on one parcel, 43 Store Road, Accord, Tax Map #68.4-5-17, R-2 Zone. The above noted application and map are open for inspection at the offices of the Planning Board and Town Clerk, Accord, NY. Persons wishing to appear at such hearings may do so in person or by attorney or other representative. Should this meeting be canceled, the public hearing will be held by the Planning Board at a workshop meeting at a date to be determined at 7:00 PM, at the Town Hall, Accord, NY." (Freeman 5/12/04)

 

Legal Notice Please be advised that the May 5th 2004 meeting of the Accord Board of Fire Commissioners has been rescheduled for May 14, 2004 starting at 7:30 PM and will be held at the Accord Fire House on Main St., Accord. At that time the opening of the bid on a fire truck for the Rochester Co. 2 Fire House shall take place. Accord Fire District Alexander Chalm District Secretary PO Box 163 Accord, NY 12404 (Freeman 5/11/04)

NOTICE is hereby given that a license for On Premises Liquor has been applied for by the undersigned to sell Beer,Wine and Liquor under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law at, 5125 Route 209, Accord, N.Y. 12404 for On Premises consumption Xtras BBQ & Grill, LLC D/B/A Xtras BBQ & Grill 5125 Route 209, Accord, N.Y. 12404 (Freeman 5/6/04)

 

 

LEGAL NOTICE BRIDGE CLOSING County Bridge #168, Van Vliet Bridge located on Tow Path Road crossing the Peters Kill Creek in the Town of Rochester will be closed to all traffic effective Monday May 10, 2004 to facilitate the replacement of the existing structure. Traffic may use Alligerville Road north 0.60 miles to Lucas Turnpike, Lucas Turnpike southwest 2.25 miles to U.S. Route 209, U.S. route 209 southwest 0.75 miles to Granite Road, Granite Road south 0.30 miles to Tow Path Road. (Freeman 5/6/04)
 
LEGAL NOTICE BRIDGE CLOSING County Bridge #39, Webster Sheldon Bridge located on Granite Road crossing the Stony Kill Creek in the Town of Rochester will be closed to all traffic effective Monday, May 10, 2004 to facilitate the replacement of the existing structure. Traffic may use NYS Route 44-55 northwest 0.50 miles to Lower Granite road, Lower Granite Road east 1.00 miles to Granite Road. (Freeman 5/6/04)

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An Open Invitation from the Supervisor and Town Board

 

Imagine Rochester

We would like to extend a special invitation to attend the Imagine Rochester Workshop on Saturday, May 15th.   This program is sponsored by the Town Board.   I hope to have a large turn out at this all-day workshop from a wide range of residents: old timers, newcomers, business owners, and anyone who has good ideas and a willingness to examine the strengths our community and the challenges that we face.

 

This is not a session to plan for the future or to establish the guidelines for a new master plan for the town.  It is intended to be more of an assessment of the issues that people in our community feel are important and to come up with ideas on how to look into these matters in greater depth in order to try to build a consensus on what we as a community must do in the coming months and years to fully develop the resources that our town has to offer.

 

We sincerely hope that you will be able to attend.  Here are the details:

 

                                Saturday, May 15

                                Rochester Reformed Church

                                Route 209,  Accord

 

                                  8:30 am                 Registration

                                  9:00 am                 Program starts

                                12:00 pm                Lunch

                                  1:00 pm                Afternoon session

 

Space is limited as we expect a large turnout.  Please call the Supervisor’s Office to make a reservation.  (626-3043).

 

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Absentee Ballot Applications for School Vote Available

Absentee Ballot applications for the Rondout Valley Central School District budget vote and school board election are available by calling the District Clerk at 845-687-2400.   We can also email or fax one to you at your request.  Applications must be received by the district clerk 7 days prior to the Tuesday, May 19, 2004 vote, which will take place at the High School gymnasium on Kyserike Road.  Absentee ballot applications can also be obtained online at : www.rochesterdemocrats.org/absentee.htm (The Rochester Democratic Committee by policy does not endorse candidates in the school board election, but distributes the forms as a public service).

 

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Rondout expects school tax jump
Kyserike – Voters in the Rondout Valley School District face a proposed 2004-2005 budget of $48.4 million and a tax levy jump of 8.65 percent.
The budget proposal cuts 1.5 administrative positions, but adds 12.5 teaching jobs and 3.5 jobs for support staff, according to Dennis Geisler, the district's business manager.
Six of the new teaching jobs will land at the high school. The middle school gains two teachers.
Residential growth has hit the district. There are more students at the high school, adding to the demand for additional staff there. Last September, the district added four teachers at the elementary school to handle growth there. Another element: "We are trying to enhance music at the elementary level," Geisler said.
Overall, expenditures are up 6.4 percent, but the district dodged some higher expenses, he said. For instance, health insurance claims are down, which translated to a rate increase of only 8 percent. The district also gained some breathing room by paying off the balance of the cost of early retirements for teachers, Geisler said.
Geisler cautioned that the tax levy is subject to factors beyond the district's control – how much the district will get once the state budget is finally decided, for instance. Another factor: The property tax assessment rates for school districts are not set until August. The vote on the budget is May 18. Geisler was still working yesterday on numbers that will be presented to residents prior to the vote.
Voters will also pick three people to fill seats on the nine-member school board. All three positions on the ballot carry terms of three years.
The candidates are: Wally Nichols; Holly Elliott, an incumbent; Pamela Longley and Imre Beke. Two incumbents are not seeking re-election: Nancy Taylor, the current president of the school board, and Tavi Cilenti. The polls will open at 6 a.m. and close at 9 p.m. on election day. The voting booths will be at the high school on Kyserike Road. Residents need to provide proof of residency. (TH-Record 4/22/04)

 

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School Budget Session is Quiet

KERHONKSON - Fewer than 10 people attended a presentation on the proposed $48.4 million Rondout Valley school district budget Monday evening, and no questions were asked.

The session at Kerhonkson Elementary School was the first of five regional presentations planned in the district prior to the May 18 budget referendum.

District officials wouldn't give an estimate of the 2004-05 tax levy, saying that figure won't be known until state aid is finalized. Last month, Assistant Superintendent Dennis Geisler told the Freeman the levy would increase by 8.65 percent to $28.6 million, provided aid comes in slightly higher than current levels.

Overall district spending is slated to increase by 6.38 percent.

"We went to the community to get information before we made this budget," said Maureen Sheehan, the school board vice president and budget committee chairwoman. "We came to Kerhonkson, we went to Rosendale, Marbletown, and the middle school. We took the information provided by the community at those meetings and developed a budget that is best for our community."

In response to public comments, the district set voting hours this year from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. May 18 at the high school. Previously, polls had opened at 10 a.m.

The board has created two other budget options in case the initial plan put before voters is rejected. The second would be a scaled-down plan; the third an austerity budget.

Sheehan said the plan to be presented to voters May 18 maintains class sizes, preserves and enhances sports and co-curricular activities and expands after school programs at both the middle school and elementary school level.

The district has been able to save money, Sheehan said, by bringing back special education students to the district campus, having staff contribute toward health insurance premiums, and eliminating a classroom teaching position due to decreased enrollment at that class level. Savings were put back into student programming, she said.

Additions include new positions in each of the elementary schools to improve student safety and public interaction.

"There would be someone at the one unlocked door at all times to make sure who is coming in the school, where they are going, and when they leave," said Al Baker, the Kerhonkson Elementary School principal.

A public hearing on the budget proposal is scheduled for 7:30 p.m. May 11 at the high school.

Also at that meeting, district residents will be able to meet the four candidates for three open seats on the school board.

Candidates include incumbent Trustee Holly Elliot and newcomers Charles Nichols, Ime Beke, and Pamela Longley.

Other regional budget presentations are planned Wednesday at the middle school, May 12 at Rosendale Elementary School and May 13, at Marbletown Elementary School. All start at 7 p.m. (Freeman 5/4/04)

 

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Stone Ridge woman killed in accident

 

A 27-year-old Stone Ridge woman was killed Friday after she was thrown from her jeep that had swerved off a section of Route 209 in the Town of Ulster.    Sandra Hornbeck was traveling southbound on Route 209 at 4:10 p.m. when she lost control of the 2004 Jeep she was driving and went off the road into a shoulder, the Ulster County Sheriff's Office said.    Hornbeck was ejected and pronounced dead at the scene by Ulster County medical examiner.    Deputies said the cause of the accident was still under investigation and

said they did not know if Hornbeck was speeding at the time of the crash or if

she was wearing a seat belt. (TH-Record 5-2-04)

 

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 UCCC board decides to hike tuition in fall

The Board of Trustees of Ulster County Community College voted Tuesday to raise tuition from $1,450 to $1,500 a semester.
The hike will take effect for the 2004-2005 academic year. The increase was approved as a means to continue the college's services to its students "at a time of rising costs, with little prospect of increased state aid," a press release said.
College President Donald C. Katt said, "This college is often the only means to begin higher education for residents of our county. Because it is important for us to keep that education affordable, I am relieved that we can report that the coming year's increase will be only $50 per semester. The community can be assured that we are doing all we can to maintain a high level of academic service to our students."
  (TH-Record 4/22/04)

 

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You want the truth?
Ulster County Republicans are tired of being bullied by county Democrats. The Republicans on the county Legislature will make local history by opening their party caucus to the public and, by extension, the press starting May 5.
Nothing says they must hold open caucuses. County Democrats have long held open caucuses. Democrats doubled the number of seats on the 33-member body. The Republicans now hold 17 seats and the Democrats 16.
The press and a few Democrats will be on hand for the GOP caucus May 5. But do Republican legislators who never say anything during legislative meetings actually take part in decisions made in caucus? (TH-Record 4/26/04)

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Two women are facing assault charges
State police and Ulster County sheriff's deputies responded to a 911 call Sunday reporting an assault at 439 Granite Road.
Investigation revealed that Sarajean Trust, 23, of Napanoch, had struck a 21-year-old woman in the head with a glass bottle, police said. Christine Kaiser, 21, of Monticello, struck the woman with a closed fist, police said.
The victim was treated at Benedictine Hospital in Kingston for a sprained arm and lacerations to the head.
Trust was charged with assault in the second degree, a felony. Kaiser was charged with assault in the third degree, a misdemeanor.
Trust was arraigned in Town of Rochester Court and released on her own recognizance to reappear at 6 p.m. April 28. Kaiser was issued an appearance ticket to appear at the same date and time.
The investigation into the incident is continuing. (TH-Record 4/28/04)

 

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Kerhonkson resident Helen Feddema's new book on Access application development will be out shortly.  It can be pre-ordered from Amazon.com

(http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ISBN=0764559044/helenfeddemaswebA). This book is written for experienced Access users, who know how to

create tables, queries, forms and other Access objects, and have some familiarity with writing Access VBA code, but need help in making the

transition from an experienced and competent Access user who can create databases for personal use, to an Access developer who can make a living

developing applications for clients. The book concentrates on this book writing VBA code to connect the components of a database into a

functioning, coherent application.

 

 

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Completion date of jail pushed back yet again

County officials learned yesterday that the opening date of their $72 million county law enforcement center is getting farther away and it will likely be over budget.
Last month the construction management firm projected the new jail would open in December. Yesterday, they pushed the opening back to the first week of January 2005. The number of changes in design and bad weather are among reasons for the delay, said Charlie Rocca, project manager for Bovis Lend Lease of Ithaca, the construction firm on the project, which is the biggest in county history.
For instance, inspectors and engineers have determined the contractors may need to go back and add as many 247 fire dampers, Rocca said. At $300 or more apiece, the bill for that change alone could be around $730,000. Richard Scaife, a vice president of Bovis, said he expects the project will be over its budget and he will have an estimate of how much in the next 30 days.
"What are we supposed to tell people?" said Democrat Alan Lomita.
"We are looking at every option," said Legislature Chairman Richard Gerentine. "I assure you the taxpayers of Ulster County will be protected when all is said and done." (TH-Record 4/23/04)

 

 

 

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Editorial from the Poughkeepsie Journal

Change Ulster government


The timing is provocative. Longtime Ulster County administrator William Darwak retired a few weeks ago, just as county lawmakers have started studying in earnest the possibility of switching to a different form of government.

Specifically, lawmakers may opt to go with an elected county executive position -- as is the case in Dutchess County -- instead of a full-time administrator hired by the legislators.

The county should make the switch. Ulster needs a strong elected leader. People tend to like electing one individual as an identifiable focus of government: a leader who can take quick action or take responsibility, as needed. Such a change would take time to enact -- years, in fact -- but the county should commit itself to the process.

Darwak was making about $93,000 annually, but the Legislature's part-time chairman is still the chief policy maker. Recent history demonstrates how dysfunctional this system can be.

The county has been beset by cost overruns on several huge projects, from building a new jail to handling waste disposal. And Ulster leaders have had unrealistic expectations about they would cover huge anticipated bills for Medicaid and employee pensions. As a result, part way through 2002, Ulster residents got hit with an unexpected sales tax hike -- from 7.75 percent to 8 percent.

Ulster's population is growing quickly, and the issues it faces have become more complicated. Huge development pressures -- from the possibility of upscale homes in the Shawangunk Ridge to Indian casinos -- can't be dealt with in a reactive way. The county needs to work closely with the towns to set clear development policies.

Though it can be messy at times, democracy is generally better served when there are strong legislative and executive branches of government. A county administrator can handle the day-to-day operations of government, but still can be too beholden to the lawmakers who hired him or her.

The Legislature has appointed Deputy Administrator Art Smith to serve as acting administrator for the time being. Certainly it will take some time for the county to change its form of government. The county and state legislatures would have to approve a charter, and voting majorities in both the City of Kingston and the rest of Ulster would have to support it as well.

Ulster County should move toward this change as soon as possible. (PJ 4/28/04)

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 Letters to the Editor

 

Dear Editor

This is a response to the issue of placement of a traffic light at the intersection 209 and Route 44/55.  I worked at the NYC Department of Transportation in a number of positions in the early 90's, and was on a number of committees including the Signage Committee, and attended Safety Committee meetings as well.  The truth is that safety engineers need to examine the level of traffic at that spot, and would have to have a warrant to place a light at that intersection.  When I ran the press office at DOD, we had to hold public meetings in Queens, where a child was killed at a site with only a stop sign and the local

community wanted a traffic light.  The sad truth is that until there is sufficient traffic to warrant a light, placement of a light in lieu of a traffic sign actually CAUSES more accidents, as people speed up to beat the light.  Sad but true.  In the Queens case, we had a hard time convincing that community, but we refused to put up the light.  Traffic modeling is a special art very scientific, highly computerized, and exceeding effective.  It takes into account such things as usage, projected increased usage, geometry, speed etc.  What we need to do is insist that State DOT do a TRAFFIC study of the site to determine whether the light should be placed.  Simply putting in a light may actually do more harm than good.  

 

Stephanie Pinto

Accord

 

 

Dear Editor:

Thank you for reproducing the article that appeared in the Daily Freeman regrading the Little Ones' Library. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Ulster County is in the process of seeking additional funding and support for this vital educational program for very young children in the Accord/Kerhonkson area. An independent community group, Friends of the Little Ones' Library, has been formed to explore ways to keep the program going. Those interested

in joining should contact Susan Matson, 340-3990. The Little Ones' Library is a special place for little ones, birth through early elementary school, where, together with parents, grandparents, care givers and other caring adults, children travel to new places, meet new

friends, snuggle on laps, learn about letters and numbers and colors and animals and trucks, and seashores and farms and feelings and laughter and....oh so many things, through books. Visit the Little Ones' Library.  Bring young children. Invite others with children. Residents of the Rondout Valley school district may borrow books to read at home.  Little Ones' Library Hours: Wednesdays, Infant and Toddler Time 9:30-11:30, Storytime at 9:30; - Thursdays and Saturdays, for all ages, 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon, Storytime at 10 am.

Lisa Berger

 

 

Dear Editor,

 

What the Rochester Supervisor wants to do with $2,500 bucks sounds admirable and worthy of the thoughtfulness it provokes. But have we not seen our school do the same thing, try to solicit good ideas out of the woodwork? The results of that are in, it always cost money and sometimes ends up dividing us. It pumps up whiners self-righteousness which let the coffers flow'.

 

Without meaning to be too rude would it not serve said administration to respect the 'home', land owners privacy as much as possible, and stay out of the face of its community? Wouldn't it be best to protect what is already and balance future growth off that? Why get rude to satisfy activist newcomers? Give us a stable, thoughtful, un-intrusive boat ride into the future. We got what we got, be it racetrack or trailer park.

 

Protect the community from going downhill, get us some jobs.   Stop raping the landowner by constant extending set backs and raising taxes.   Practice practical conservation.   Why aren't wells and drain fields written into new deeds?  You want to spend money? Give us marked bike and walking paths along our fine country roads.

 

Sort of Grandfather us all and go on from there.

 

Bill Dukas

Kerhonkson

 

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 Mombaccus Mine Expansion & Legal Notices

NYS DEC Environmental Notice Bulletin April 28, 2004

 

Applicant: Mombaccus Estates Ltd
710 Cherrytown Rd
Kerhonkson, NY 12446 -9654 Facility: Mombaccus Sand & Gravel Mine
Cross Rd Near Rochester Center Rd
Kerhonkson, NY 12446 Application ID: 3-5144-00057/00001 Permit(s) Applied for: Article 23 Title 27 Mined Land Reclamation
Project is Located: Rochester, Ulster County Project Description:

The applicant proposes to continue to mine sand and gravel from a 7 acre area and also mine material from an additional 7 acres of a 14 acre total life-of-mine on a 22.5 acre parcel. This proposed permit renewal will increase the area to be mined from 7 acres to a maximum area of 14 acres. A total of approximately 300,000 cubic yards of material is proposed to be removed from the site. No reclamation is proposed during the current permit term of 5 years. Processing of material on site is limited is limited to crushing and screening. The project is located on the south side of Rochester Center Road 1,000 feet east of Cross Road in the Town of Rochester.

State Environmental Quality Review (SEQR) Determination: Project is not subject to SEQR because it is a Type II action. SEQR Lead Agency: None Designated State Historic Preservation Act (SHPA) Determination: The proposed activity is not subject to review in accordance with SHPA. The permit type is exempt or the activity is being reviewed in accordance with federal historic preservation regulations. Coastal Management: This project is not located in a Coastal Management area and is not subject to the Waterfront Revitalization and Coastal Resources Act. Opportunity for Public Comment: Comments on this project must be submitted in writing to the Contact Person no later than May 14 2004. Contact: R Scott Ballard
NYSDEC Region 3 Headquarters
21 South Putt Corners Rd
New Paltz, NY 12561
(845)256-3054
rsballar@gw.dec.state.ny.us

 

 

LEGAL NOTICE BRIDGE CLOSING County Bridge #168, Van Vliet Bridge located on Tow Path Road crossing the Peters Kill Creek in the Town of Rochester will be closed to all traffic effective Monday May 10, 2004 to facilitate the replacement of the existing structure. Traffic may use Alligerville Road north 0.60 miles to Lucas Turnpike, Lucas Turnpike southwest 2.25 miles to U.S. Route 209, U.S. route 209 southwest 0.75 miles to Granite Road, Granite Road south 0.30 miles to Tow Path Road. (Freeman 5/5/04)

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Rochester Residents Association to Hold Open Forum

The Rochester Residents Association will hold an open forum to discuss current areas of interest and to develop ideas for future activities.  Supervisor Pam Duke will also be on hand to discuss town issues.  The meeting will take place at 1:00 on Sunday, April 24th at the Rochester Town Hall in Accord.  All are welcome.

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 Rochester Supervi sor Wants Input from Town Residents

ACCORD - Rochester town Supervisor Pam Duke wants to know the vision townspeople have for their town and is planning a day for ideas to be shared. 

Duke last week announced dates for "town meetings" with constituents at four voting sites in the town.

"At each meeting, one councilman will join me," she said. "I feel this is an opportunity for people to come and just talk about concerns and where they see the town going.".

Meetings will be held at the Accord Firehouse April 21, the Rochester No. 2 Firehouse April 22, Town Justice Court April 26 and the Alligerville Firehouse April 27. All four sessions will start at 7 p.m.

Duke said she is also planning a workshop that will accommodate 100 people to discuss the town's future development.

"We can form as many committees and groups as we want, but the question remains: Where is this town going?" she said.

"I'm calling this 'Imagine Rochester,'" Duke said. "People interpret the direction they want the town to go in several different ways."

Duke said the effort "does not come without a price tag," explaining that she wants to hire a consultant to lead the sessions. One she is considering is Michele Green of the Rhinebeck firm Greenplan, which would charge $2,500 to help residents and property owners set a direction for the town.

A date for the workshop has not been set, but Duke expects it will be a daylong affair.

"There will be an entire marketing campaign about Imagine Rochester and all information will be provided well in advance of the date," she said.

In other business at last week's Town Board meeting:

* The board voted to require a background check on all town personnel who work with youth. Duke said Rochester is the first town in the state to have such a requirement.

* The board agreed to examine the feasibility of the town accepting the Lucas Avenue water system as a town entity, extending a six-month moratorium on mobile home parks by another three months, and contributing more town funds to the Little Ones Library on U.S. Route 209.  (Freeman 4-4-04)

 

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Earth Day Clean up Scheduled for April 24

The Town’s Youth Commission will host its annual roadside clean up day in celebration of Earth Day on Saturday, April 25th.  On this day, roadside litter and debris can be dropped off at no charge at the Town’s transfer station – please call the Youth Commission at 626-2115 for further information.

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 Friends of Historic Rochester Host History Day on May 8th

Friends of Historic Rochester will hold its annual History Day on Saturday, May 8th at the group’s library on Main Street in Accord.  The event will feature tours of the library and a plant sale.  The plant sale, which will benefit Friends of Historic Rochester,  will take place  Accord Fire District parking.  A fabulous variety of flowering perennials plus bedding plants and annuals donated by local
gardeners and by our local garden centers. 

 

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Rondout School Board Candidates Announced

Four candidates will compete to fill three vacancies on the board of the Rondout Valley school district. Incumbent Holly Elliott will face Imre Beke Jr. of Kerhonkson, Wally Nichols of Kerhonkson, and Pamela Longley of High Falls at the polls. Incumbents Tavi Cilenti and Board President Nancy Taylor did not file petitions to run for their seats on the board when their terms expire at the end of June, according to district officials.  (Freeman 4/20/04)

 

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Absentee Ballot Applications for School Vote Available

Absentee Ballot applications for the Rondout Valley Central School District budget vote and school board election are available by calling the District Clerk at 845-687-2400.   We can also email or fax one to you at your request.  Applications must be received by the district clerk 7 days prior to the Tuesday, May 19, 2004 vote, which will take place at the High School gymnasium on Kyserike Road.  Absentee ballot applications can also be obtained online at : www.rochesterdemocrats.org/absentee.htm (The Rochester Democratic Committee by policy does not endorse candidates in the school board election, but distributes the forms as a public service).

 

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Volunteers Needed for Rochester Food Pantry

VOLUNTEERS are needed at the Rochester Food Pantry to pack and hand out food at the Pantry for about an hour a day for a week every five or six weeks.  The Pantry is located at the back of the Accord Fire House.  Please, call 626-7501 and leave a message for Wilma de Jager if you are willing to help. Your neighbors will appreciate it.

 

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Little Ones Library Means a Lot

ACCORD - The Little Ones Library was started by Cornell Cooperative Extension of Ulster County in 2000 to serve preschoolers in the area, but now it's the community's turn to keep it going.

"Cornell has been responsible for base funding ... however, our funding abilities and responsibility ends at the end of 2004," said Sue Matson, a Cornell Cooperative Extension educator. "The process of transitioning has started.

"The Little Ones Library could continue with additional town funding or funds from other sources, or transition could mean yet a different concept be initiated by another source that will continue the emphasis to be on the early learning for young children," she said.

The transition may require a change in location, depending on who or what entity steps forward to oversee the project. At present, the extension rents space for the library from the Rochester Reformed Church on U.S. Route 209.

Cornell plans to step down slowly, she said, and will not turn away contacts for advice and ideas.

"This has been a fun project, one where planning includes much laughter," Matson said. "The great part has been the community involvement during the past three years."

The library was started from scratch with 90 books and a major effort on those involved at that start to get the word out in this rural community.

At the time the idea was conceived, most other sources of developmental education sites in the area between Ellenville and Stone Ridge had closed. A parent of a young child living in the Trails End area of the town of Rochester would have to travel to Stone Ridge or Ellenville for library services.

Funding for books and donations of books have come from numerous sources since 2000, including the Ulster County Youth Bureau, Rondout Valley Lions Club and Ellenville Lioness Club, Stewart's Shops, and a three-year grant from the Charitable Venture Foundation.

"It has been proven over and over (and) there is much research to show the amount of development that happens during early childhood," Matson said. "Years ago, when children were at home with the caregiver, there was often a give and take of nursery rhymes and songs as the day went by. The caregiver only knew that repetition seemed to make the child happy, but studies have shown that repetition of reading and singing is so necessary for the brain development in a young child."

The library is open Wednesdays and Saturdays, and site coordinator Marie Ulmer can usually be found reading to young children those days. Wednesdays' programs are designed for infants and toddlers, while Saturdays are for older, preschool children.

Special programs are planned all the time. This Saturday, for example, is "A to Z, Come Play with Me" day from 10 a.m. to noon.

Matson recalled "Sea Day" when volunteers and supporters turned the entire site into a river environment. Then there was the "Good Night Moon Room," when local senior Loretta McClain dressed as a cow.

Matson also credits Ellenville Children's Librarian Susan Mangan for creativity and advice, designating her as the "mother of children's libraries."

"We serve more children every year and we target the Accord and Kerhonkson area, although we have children attending from Woodstock and Wallkill.

"These young children are our future firefighters, rescue squad volunteers, school and church leaders," Matson said. "We know there is an entity in that local community that is willing to continue this educational concept after the end of this year and we know the transition will go smoothly."  (Freeman 4/20/04)

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Wawarsing Crash Kills New Jersey Couple

WAWARSING - An elderly husband and wife from New Jersey were killed Wednesday morning when their car collided with a cement truck, state police said.

Troopers at the Ellenville barracks said Dolly Kosofsky, 80, of Bradley Beach, N.J., was driving a 2002 Toyota westbound on U.S. Route 44/state Route 55, failed to yield the right of way at a stop sign at U.S. Route 209 and, while trying to turn left onto Route 209 southbound, was struck on the driver's side by an unloaded 2003 Oshkosh cement truck.

Kosofsky and her husband, Sidney Kosofsky, 88, were pronounced dead at the scene by Ulster County Medical Examiner Dr. Walter Dobushak, police said.

Police said the Kosofskys apparently had been visiting the Hudson Valley Resort and Spa in Kerhonkson for the Jewish holiday of Passover, which ended Tuesday night.

The driver of the cement truck, Robert Salisbury, 60, of Neversink, was treated at the scene for pain to his right knee, police said. They said the truck he was driving belongs to Clemente Latham Concrete of Monticello.

All three people involved in the accident were wearing seat belts, police said.

Traffic had to be rerouted around the accident scene for about five hours, police said.

State police were assisted by the Ulster County Sheriff's Office, the Kerhonkson Fire Department and the Kerhonkson-Accord First Aid Squad.  (Freeman 4-15-04)

 

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 Residents hopeful crash spurs action
By Deborah Medenbach
Times Herald-Record
 Kerhonkson – A double-fatal accident at the intersection of Route 44/55 and Route 209 Wednesday renewed neighborhood resolve to get a light at the site.
"Nine out of 10 cars that come through that intersection don't stop at the stop sign," Jim Krum said. He should know. He can sit at his living room window and watch most cars treat the red octagon like a rolling yield.
The wreck from Wednesday's accident landed in Krum's front yard at the spot where his wife puts their children on the bus. It's not the first time he's had a crushed car within feet of his front door. He estimates he'll see one accident every two weeks from now until fall. Oddly, it's rare for accidents to occur there at night or during the winter, he said.
Trooper William Meyers of the New York State Police Traffic Safety Office said that while the meaning of a red octagon is universally understood even among children, many drivers seem to ignore the stop sign at that T-intersection.
Neither the state nor local emergency response agencies had ready statistics on how many accidents occurred at the intersection in the past year.
Krum and neighbors Laurie Roosa and Gail Dalsgerd hope the state Department of Transportation will at least put a flashing light at the intersection.
"You can't see a northbound car until it's right on top of you," Roosa said.
Krum believes a light would solve the problem, slowing northbound cars and forcing cars on Route 44/55 to stop instead of rolling into the intersection. Other suggestions from neighbors were a flashing "stop ahead" sign by the Route 44/55 bridge and more police monitoring.
"There was a request [by residents] filed in September 2002 for a signal there," DOT spokeswoman Colleen McKenna said. "We're doing a signal study now. It's not complete yet since we handle seven counties, but we are actively collecting accident statistics and traffic studies."
Dennis Ballentine, owner of Minnewaska Motors across the highway, supports his neighbor's efforts.
"It's a deadly, deadly intersection, as evidenced by this accident." (TH-Record 4/16/04)

 

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Accord Speedway Gears up for Opener

"We're going to be able to draw for the points fund from the tire company and that will help with our revenue at the track," Palmer said. "We raced with the new tires during the Fall Series and the softer compound is helping the cars turn faster.

"They're also going to lead to less spinouts and it's going to enable racers in different divisions to buy used tires from each other."

Palmer also said that the move away from DIRT has been well received by the drivers and their crews.

"Most of the guys who race here weren't competing for the DIRT points anyway," he said.

Without the worry for DIRT points, Palmer has been able to extend the regular season and eliminated the Fall Series.

Racing is scheduled over 24 weeks through Sept. 25 and the season officially ends on Oct. 30 with the third annual Turkey Chase 100.

Recent rains should not effect the opener and Palmer decided against using Saturdays as rain dates.

"Fridays are our niche and some of the guys run at other tracks on Saturday," he said. "The track is in great shape and we just have to hope against a rainy summer."

Rich Ricci Jr. of New Paltz returns to defend his 358 modified title from last year and will be challenged by other locals such as brother Mike Ricci, Robbie Green, Jackie Brown Jr., Joe Winne Jr., J.R. Heffner, Andy Bachetti and 2003 Rookie of the Year Tony Kawalchuk.

Wallkill's Kevin Duryea is the defending Sportsman champ, while Jim Langenback (pro stock), Kerhonkson's Jeremy Quick (mini-sprint) and William Landrum (pure stock) are also back trying to repeat in their respective divisions.

Nicole Tracy, one of the top women drivers at Accord, is a contender in the Sportsman division.

Special events at the track include two races for the modifieds, the fourth annual Joe Winne Memorial 55-lap race on June 4 and the third annual Bobby Green Memorial 50-lap on Aug. 6.

Pro stocks shoot for a big payday on July 9 at the Art Tyler Memorial 50-lap.

K&W Car Wash is sponsoring the annual fireworks night on July 2. Vintage modifieds compete at the track on May 7, May 28, June 11, July 16, Aug. 20, Sept. 11 and Sept. 25.

Camera and Autograph Night is on June 25 and Banner Night is Aug. 13.

Palmer is welcoming a number of new sponsors to the track this season, including Rhinebeck Ford, Bryant's Towing and JCC Motorsports Racing School from Middletown. (Freeman 4-14-04)

 

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 Legal Notices

 

PLANNER POSITION- Available. Town of Rochester looking for a qualified Planner to work with applicants and Planning Board. Please send resume by April 28, 2004 to PO Box 65, Accord, NY 12404 attention Pam Duke, Supervisor. (Freeman 4/11/04)
 
LEGAL NOTICE The Board of Fire Commissioners of the Accord Fire District, Accord, N.Y. will receive sealed bids for the purchase of a 2004 Pumper 1000 gallon capacity. Bids on such items will be submitted in sealed envelopes to the Accord Fire District, Alexander Chalm, Secretary P.O. Box 163 Accord N.Y. 12404 or hand delivered prior to May 5, 2004 by 7:30 P.M. Each bid shall bear on the face thereof, the name and address of the bidder and must also designate "Bid for a 2004 Pumper". All bids will be publicly read aloud at the regular meeting of the Board of Fire Commissioners of the Accord Fire District on May 5, 2004 at 7:30 P.M. The meeting will be held at the Alligerville Fire House, (Alligerville N.Y.) Specifications, at a cost of $50.00 to the bidder, may be obtained by calling or writing to Alexander Chalm, Secretary at the above address or calling (845) 626-3707 between the hours of 9 A.M. to noon Monday or Wednesday. Bidders must comply with the laws of the State of New York and (Non-Collusive Bid Certificate) is required by Section 1030 of the General Municipal Law, must be submitted with each bid. The successful bidder may be required to furnish and pay for a satisfactory performance bond. The Board of Fire Commissioners reserves the right to consider bids for a period of forty five (45) days after their opening during which time no bidder may withdraw his bid and the right is reserved to the Board of Fire Commissioners to accept or reject any and all bids or to accept the bid which is best in the interest of the Fire District. Dated: April 8, 2004 Board of Fire Commissioners Alexander Chalm District Secretary (4/11/04)

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Letters to the Editor:

 

Dear Editor:

At the April 1st Rochester town board meeting, track neighbors opposed the renewal of the Accord Speedway¹s annual operating permit because its existing permit was invalid and put citizens at risk for a big insurance bill.

   Gary and Donna Palmer have, in our opinion, been hiding behind the corporate shield of the previous owner¹s corporation, Twin Track Promotions, Inc. (³TTP²) in order to avoid applying for their own new operating and special use permits.  TTP was dissolved for failure to pay franchise taxes on September 25, 2002. The Palmers claim this was  an"oversight"despite the fact that all the corporate papers were addressed to them.

   Under NY State Law, one is not allowed to conduct any business when his corporation is dissolved. In applying for a 2003 permit, the Palmers failed to reveal the fact that TTP had been dissolved. Thus, they received an annual operating permit under false pretenses. This permit was invalid and put the Town of Rochester and its citizens in jeopardy. Had there been an accident - or even a death, which has occurred before at this track – the town would very likely have been liable because of the fraudulent application.

   For the Palmers to claim they were never dissolved is untrue. Quite by accident, we discovered the dissolution and acquired a certified copy of TTP's dissolution with the US Department of State's seal on it. The Palmers would have continued to hoodwink the Town about their dissolution had we not exposed them; they were in the process of applying for their 2004 renewal under the dissolved TTP when their dissolution was discovered. Because TTP was dissolved, their corporate name was up for grabs, so we reserved it. One might wonder how we got their name if they weren't in fact dissolved!    In exposing the dissolution of TTP's corporation, the track neighbors were not insisting that the track be closed down, but that Gary and Donna Palmer  apply for new operating and special use permits as required by town law. Then their permit would have been legal and liability concerns would have been moot.  They would have been subjected to the scrutiny that all new track owners go through in order to establish that they are ³fit, qualified and capable² to operate a racetrack²so as to protect the safety, health, morals and welfare of the town and its inhabitants.²  (Chapter 107-4 (6) of Rochester Town Law) The Palmers¹ failure to pay corporate franchise taxes and to be two years behind in their local property taxes raises questions as to their qualifications and capabilities.

4/13/04

 

   Since writing the above, new information has come to light.   Gary Palmer has a criminal record - 3 arrests for failure to pay state use and income taxes.  These arrests each resulted in a year long jail term.  The jail time was suspended and Mr. Palmer was put on 3 years probation, during which time he continued to evade his tax payments which was why TTP was eventually dissolved.  Mr. Palmer also had a 4th criminal offense for operating an unlicensed auto body shop. He has two judgments against him in civil court to do with a Chapter 7 bankruptcy filing.  He also was sued by his insurance company for unpaid bills.  Donna Palmer has been sued in Small Claims Court for failure to pay a hospital bill.

   Donna Palmer swore under oath in the 2001, 2002 and 2003 permit application submissions that ³neither applicant nor applicants owners, officers or employees has ever been convicted of a felony or misdemeanor in any court in this state or the United States.²  The Palmers have obtained these operating permits by making false statements under oath as to the state of their corporation and Gary Palmer¹s criminal record.

   We urge the Town Board to uphold their laws and revoke the permit.  The Palmers have gained access to operating the Speedway under false pretenses. The Palmers alone are to blame for what is taking place.

 

Lorna and Kim Massie

Accord, NY

 

 

Dear Editor:

i did not attend the "race track' public hearing.  A few who did attend stated that the vast majority (150 to 15) of residents favored the approval of this season's schedule.  Your article seems to suggest the opposit was true.  RRA...what was the REAL rochester residents position?  Did the majority of residents favor the track or did the town vote against the town residents?

David F. O'Halloran

 

Editor’s Note:  The article was written by a Daily Freeman reporter and appeared exactly as it was published in that newspaper.

 

Dear Editor: 

Well I recieved the latest version of the town Crier and failed to see your promise to set the FACTS straight in regards to the Speedway and emergency organiztions, that I spoke to you about with my ambulance company not pulling out for coverage due to non-payment, but due to lack of MANPOWER. You stated that nobody would assume that it was our squad, well sir our squad has been covering the race track since I have been on the squad and even longer than that,and thats going back to 1992. Our squad has been the designated ambulance coverage till this year and YES , many people have come to asking how come we haven't gotten paid from the Squad making it a sour note towards the speedway, we are telling people that we do not get paid , but receive DONATIONS (being a non-profit organization)that we are. Another thing I would like to know , is that you told me your resource was a member from an ambulance squad, I ask that you tell me who your source was that felt to speak falsely about my Squad.  You tell everyone that you are for the community and in it for its best interests, shame no one can tell whats the truth or fiction nowadays, cause people who write for the public such as yourself, should be held in a neutral standing, instead of expressing their own feeling when they want. I would like a response from you on when you will clarify the story about us and the speedway!

please mail your response to my new address. Thank you for taking time out in your busy schedule!  

Brian Belile

Kerhonkson-Accord First Aid

 

Editor’s reply.  We stand by our story and note that the Accord Speedway has attempted to contract with ambulance companies besides the Kerhonkson-Accord First Aid Squad.

 

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'Imagine Rochester' program launched
Supervisor Pam Duke announced the launch of the "Imagine Rochester" program Tuesday.
The town meetings will involve community members in each of the town's four voting districts in shaping Rochester's direction over the next five to 10 years. Town officials will be on hand to listen to local concerns and residents' ideas of how to reach goals.
The information gathered during the fact-finding sessions will be used to identify common concerns in the town. Citizen committees will be organized to address several of the stated goals, the actions needed to achieve them, and the time frames in which they can be achieved.
Meetings are planned for 7 p.m. April 21 at the Accord Firehouse on Main Street; April 22 at Rochester II Firehouse on Samsonville Road; April 26 at the Rochester Town Court on Samsonville Road; and April 27 at the Alligerville Firehouse on Creek Road. (TH-Record 4/2/04)

 

“Imagine Rochester” Community Meetings Announced

ACCORD - Rochester town Supervisor Pam Duke wants to know the vision townspeople have for their town and is planning a day for ideas to be shared.

Duke last week announced dates for "town meetings" with constituents at four voting sites in the town. "At each meeting, one councilman will join me," she said. "I feel this is an opportunity for people to come and just talk about concerns and where they see the town going.".

Meetings will be held at the Accord Firehouse April 21, the Rochester No. 2 Firehouse April 22, Town Justice Court April 26 and the Alligerville Firehouse April 27. All four sessions will start at 7 p.m.  Duke said she is also planning a workshop that will accommodate 100 people to discuss the town's future development.

"We can form as many committees and groups as we want, but the question remains: Where is this town going?" she said.  "I'm calling this 'Imagine Rochester,'" Duke said. "People interpret the direction they want the town to go in several different ways."

Duke said the effort "does not come without a price tag," explaining that she wants to hire a consultant to lead the sessions. One she is considering is Michele Green of the Rhinebeck firm Greenplan, which would charge $2,500 to help residents and property owners set a direction for the town.

A date for the workshop has not been set, but Duke expects it will be a daylong affair.

"There will be an entire marketing campaign about Imagine Rochester and all information will be provided well in advance of the date," she said.

In other business at last week's Town Board meeting:

* The board voted to require a background check on all town personnel who work with youth. Duke said Rochester is the first town in the state to have such a requirement.

* The board agreed to examine the feasibility of the town accepting the Lucas Avenue water system as a town entity, extending a six-month moratorium on mobile home parks by another three months, and contributing more town funds to the Little Ones Library on U.S. Route 209.  (Daily Freeman 4./4/04)

 

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Chamber of Commerce to Honor Max Finestone and Harold Lipton

 The Kerhonkson/Accord Chamber of Commerce, Inc. has scheduled their popular sixth Annual Faux Academy awards Scholarship Dinner Dance for Friday, May 7, 2004 to be held once again at Twin Lakes. This year's Lifetime Achievement award spotlight shines on two outstanding people, Town of Rochester's former Supervisor, Harold Lipton, and Max Finestone, both of whom have given politically, creatively, and unselfishly to the community for decades. DJ's Adam and Jaime Paddock will once again provide music for everyone's taste, and Twin Lakes will as in the past, please our taste buds.

 

 The Faux Academy Awards not only honors deserving area people for lifetime achievements, it provides a $500 Scholarship to a talented Rondout Valley High School Senior pursuing a career in Performing Arts. During this popular event, many Faux awards such as for Best Actor/Actress, Best Producer, Director, etc. are given out to unsuspecting guests. All the Faux nominees receive a certificate of recognition, and Faux-winners receive, just like the real Academy Awards, an "Oscar" statuette. Winners usually get into it by hamming-it-up, and giving speeches like, "You like me. You really like me."

 

For tickets contact

Kerhonkson/Accord Chamber of Commerce, Inc.

PO Box 545

Accord, NY 12404

(845) 626-2616 ·Fax/phone (845) 626-5537

Contact person: Valerie Weaver (845) 626-5537 or Valerie3w@PeoplePC.com

 

 

 

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Man who alleged attack by town workers wins $55,000 in civil suit

 

KINGSTON - A state Supreme Court jury has awarded $55,000 in damages to an Accord man who claimed he was attacked three years ago by nine town of Rochester highway workers as their boss, Highway Superintendent Wayne Kelder, stood by.

The jury verdict was unanimous in favor of David Stoltz, a 62-year-old sculptor, who had sought $4 million in compensatory and punitive damages for the February 2001 attack he said took place at a storage shed adjacent to his property at 33 Main St. in Accord.

According to the lawsuit filed by Stoltz in June 2002, the incident grew from an ongoing dispute with the highway department over the storage of road salt, calcium chloride and other potentially harmful materials on a dirt floor in the shed. Stoltz said the shed lay less than 70 feet from his well and he was concerned about the chemicals leaching into his water supply.

On Feb. 8, 2001, a day after a state department of Environmental Conservation officer advised him that he would be inspecting the facility, Stoltz said he was attacked by highway department workers after he entered the shed to take photographs of them loading bags of calcium chloride stored in the shed onto trucks. Stoltz alleged that Kelder instigated the attack with the words, "OK boys, get the camera."

Kelder admitted in a statement to state police that he had told Stoltz, "You can't take pictures of me because I'm an elected official. I'm going to have to confiscate the film." However, he said the comments were made in jest.

Kelder denied coming closer than 15 feet to Stoltz. Depositions from other highway department employees present at the shed that day also denied any attack on Stoltz.

Stoltz filed a complaint against the employees with state police, but no criminal charges were filed.

Kelder did not return calls seeking comment on the verdict.

According to Stoltz's attorney Jonathan Follander, the jury found for Stoltz on two counts, battery and intentional infliction of emotional distress. Two additional counts of verbal assault and negligent supervision by Kelder of his employees were thrown out before trial by state Supreme Court Justice Michael Kavanagh.

Follander said the jury found awarded Stoltz $50,000 for emotional distress based on testimony from Stoltz and a neuropsychiatrist about the fear, intimidation and anxiety he felt as a result of the alleged attack, including a diagnosis of post traumatic stress disorder.

The jury awarded Stoltz an additional $5,000 based on his allegation that highway workers shoved him to the ground and tried to seize his camera.

Follander said he was not yet sure if attorney's fees would be included in the verdict.

According to Follander, Stoltz's allegations were backed up by testimony from several individuals who heard accounts of the incident from workers present that day as well as photographs taken by Stoltz showing hands thrust in front of his camera and workers advancing towards him from the back of the shed.

"I'm very glad that David finally got his day in court, and that the jury did the fair thing based on the evidence presented to them," Follander said.

The suit had named the town of Rochester, the Highway Department and Kelder as defendants.

Town Supervisor Pam Duke, who just took office in January, said she would not comment until she had a chance to review the verdict.  (Freeman 4/2/04)

 

 

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Rochester Hearing Will Continue on Mobile Home Park Expansion

ACCORD - A public hearing on the proposed expansion of a mobile home park will be continued as Rochester town planners look into concerns raised by residents Monday evening.

One question planners hope to address is whether the mobile home park is, or ever was, legal.

About 60 people attended a two-hour meeting Monday that was a follow-up to a public hearing on the same proposal in February 2003.

Michael Baum, who wants to expand the 16-unit mobile home park by 45 units, now owns the former Tessler property on Cherrytown Road in Kerhonkson.

Under the proposal, units would be sited in a planned development, with 42 of the total 66 acres left as open space.

"Mr. Baum purchased the property in 2002 and a year ago in February we held a meeting to provide information to the public," said project engineer Barry Medenbach. "At the time Mr. Baum purchased this property, he purchased a very run down trailer park and has made many, many improvements since."

Medenbach said research has been done on potential impacts concerning flooding, availability of water, and effects on schools, historical properties and archeological sites.

A small area of what Medenbach describes as Indian-era sharps was found and cataloged, and information has been provided to the state Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. The state agency has said there would be no significant impact from the project.

Attorney Drayton Grant, representing adjacent property owners Francis and Alice Gray, reminded board members of their need to be sensitive to the environmental impacts. Francis Gray is a town councilman.

Grant said the state report did not even include the correct photo of the house owned by Gray, but one of the house across the road.

Rondout Valley school Trustee Holly Elliott urged planners to consider the cost of educating individual students and to realize the proposed mobile home park could easily house at least 50 school-age children.

"It is a $9,600 net cost per student," she said. "Multiply that times 50 and you get $480,000 in additional net taxes."

Steve Fornal urged planners to check the background of the Tessler trailer park saying that Alex Tessler had never been issued an operating permit and the park has been operating illegally for more than 25 years. Medenbach, however, cited a letter from town Code Enforcement Officer Douglas Dymond saying that the site is approved for 16 lots. (Freeman -3/30/04)

 

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 Green light given to Accord Speedway card

 

ACCORD - Despite opposition, Accord Speedway's 2004 race schedule has been approved by the Rochester Town Board, allowing the track to operate officially this summer. 

Opponents of the speedway's noise level have complained that the facility operated illegally last year under the business name Twin Track Promotions, which they say was dissolved in 2002.

Several attendees at Thursday's standing-room-only Town Board meeting opposed an operating permit for speedway operator Gary Palmer because his application listed the business as Twin Track Promotions.

Lorna Massie, a member of Citizens Accord, said she purchased the name Twin Track Promotions.

"I urge you not to renew the permit," said Massie. "Twin Track Promotions has been dissolved since Sept. 25, 2002, and cannot conduct any business. In 2003 the town did not know this and races were held.

"To me this is dishonest and the town is at risk," said Massie. "Gary Palmer knowingly misled the town."

But Kenneth McGuire, Palmer's lawyer, explained that Accord Speedway has owned the facility since 1991 and had provided certified copies of this information from the state to the Rochester town clerk.

McGuire said Massie stole the business name Twin Track Promotions. But affiliates of Citizens Accord say she acquired it legally by paiding for it.

A legal oversight in paperwork and mail sent to a wrong address provided the basis for the initial permit application to be made under the name Twin Track Promotions, according to McGuire.

"Some stock of the corporation was sold. That same corporation that sold that stock has owned the speedway since 1991. This is similar to IBM selling stock ... IBM still owns the buildings, they have just sold the stock. The corporation still owns the speedway, they just sold some stock," explained McGuire.

Palmer submitted his speedway permit renewal application to Town Clerk Veronica Sommer on Feb. 24, under the name Twin Track Promotion Inc.

There is no required public hearing for annual permit renewal. The Town Board simply approves the operating schedule.

Palmer has since submitted documentation showing that the corporation owning the speedway did not dissolve and has resubmitted a request for permit renewal under the business name of Accord Speedway Inc.

speedway opponents stressed that noise continues to be an issue. Supporters described the speedway as a source of alcohol-free family recreation and an attraction that draws people into the area.

"The Accord Speedway is as important to Accord as our farming community," said Toni Sindone Thompson. "I would never want to put my personal preference ahead of local heritage. To take away the speedway and part of our identity is wrong. The Palmer family is there for the town."

Before approving the 2004 race schedule, Rochester Town Supervisor Pam Duke urged each board member to comment.

"First, it appears that this board needs to examine if the 2003 operating permit was valid. If not, the applicant will have to reapply for a permit to operate, as well as a special use permit," said Duke.

With the exception of Councilman Francis Gray, all said they felt research proved there was confusion and all documentation shows that the permit request is in order.

Gray said he doubts the legality of the 2003 permit. "When dissolved, how can a corporation be issued a operating permit?" he said.

Duke urged the community to work together and compromise.  (4/3/04)

 

 

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Tax sale
Notice of 1 Day Sale at Public Auction of County Lands Quimby Theatre, Vanderlyn Hall Ulster County Community College, Stone Ridge, New York
April 22nd, 2004, 9:30 AM.  For more information, visit
http://www.co.ulster.ny.us/auction04.html


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Transitions:

 

Former Accord businessman Richard C. Siegel passed away on March 19 at his home in Great Barrington, MA after a six-year struggle with cancer.  Siegel, with his wife, Karen Skelton, were instrumental in the revitalization of Main Street when they moved their successful pottery and gift business, Potluck Studios, to Accord in 1993.  The business moved to the Berkshires in October 2002 when it merged with Pine Cone Hill in Pittsfield, MA.  A memorial service is planned in late May, for further information, please contact his wife at Karen.skelton@verizon.net.

 

Jennie D. Bell, 88, died on April 2nd at Mountain View Nursing Home in New Paltz.  Mrs. Bell was a member of the Rochester Reformed Church, the Willin Workers, and the Ladies Aid Society of the Church.  She was also a member of the Patroon Grange of Accord.  Mrs. Bell was the widow of Aaron Bell, who died on July 2, 1982 and is survived by a son, Gordon of Accord, a daughter, Linda Schick of Williamsville; eight grandchildren, five great grandchildren and nieces and nephews.

 

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Vigil to mark eighth year of teen's disappearance

By Deborah Medenbach
Times Herald-Record
dmedenbach@th-record.com

Samsonville – Emily Martin was 10 years old when her teenage brother, Joey, disappeared.
"I remember he came in my room and asked me to put his hair up for him. He had it shaved underneath and sometimes liked to wear the longer hair back in a ponytail. Then I went to bed and never saw him again," Emily recalled.
Emily is about to graduate from high school, and she's making plans for her future, but the eight-year-old mystery of her brother's disappearance remains.
Investigators have pieced together that Joseph Martin, then 15, climbed out his bedroom window at 10:30 p.m. March 25, 1996, to go look at the comet Hyakutake. Two of his friends waited for him until nearly midnight a mile away at Schwabbie Turnpike. Figuring Joey had been caught sneaking out and wouldn't show up that night, the boys walked home.
Joey was never seen again. He would now be 23.
At the time of his disappearance, he was described as blond with hazel eyes, 5 feet 2 inches tall, and weighing 115 pounds. He was last seen wearing a hooded green sweatshirt over a blue-and-green flannel shirt. He was wearing blue jeans and either black Reeboks or green Puma sneakers. He had two earrings in his left ear.
Joey's mother, Cathaleen Lightstone, pastes missing person stickers with Joey's image to her letters and bills, hoping someone will recognize him.
State police Investigator Mark Scarcelli at the Ellenville barracks is the latest investigator to work the case. There are few leads. An age-progressed image was created last year by the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children.
A vigil walk will be held at 6 p.m. tonight – the eighth anniversary of Joey's disappearance.
Community members and friends will gather at the Martin home on Samsonville Road and walk to Schwabbie Turnpike, where family members will light eight candles and post a fresh "missing person" sign.

For directions to the vigil, call 626-5109. Tips can be called in to the state police at 626-2801 or e-mailed to crimetip@troopers.state.ny.us. (TH- Record 3/25/04)

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Student injured in schoolyard assault

A Rondout Valley Middle School seventh-grader faces assault charges after a schoolyard fight over football team picks, school officials said.
Principal Raymond Palmer said the two boys got into an argument during the 12:40 p.m. recess yesterday. One boy struck the other in the side of the head with a padlock, causing a large cut that required more than a dozen stitches to close.
Names of the students were withheld because of their age.
The victim was given first aid by the school nurse and then taken for medical treatment. The attacker was questioned by school officials and state police. Assault charges will be filed, Palmer said.
"This is an unfortunate incident and we won't tolerate it in our school," Palmer said. (Freeman 3/26/04)

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 March 4, 2004 Democratic Primary Results

Results of the March 4, 2004 Democratic Party Presidential Primary are as follows:

Kerry 150, Kucinich 76, Edwards 36, Dean 16, Clark 4, Sharpton 4, Gephardt 1, Larouche 1.

 

[Note on political notices:  We will publish news and announcements from any political party or candidate, but will not endorse any party or candidate.]

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 School Board and Budget Election

 

NOTICE OF ANNUAL BUDGET VOTE AND BOARD ELECTION RONDOUT VALLEY CENTRAL SCHOOL DISTRICT NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Annual Budget Vote and Board Election of the Rondout Valley Central School District will be held in the Gymnasium at the Rondout Valley High School, on Kyserike Road, Accord, New York, on Tuesday, May 18, 2004, between the hours of 6:00 a.m. and 9 p.m. prevailing time. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that a copy of the statement of the amount of money which will be required for School District purposes during the 2004-2005 school year (the Budget), exclusive of public monies, may be obtained by any resident of the District during business hours, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. at each of the Districts schoolhouses and at the District Offices, effective May 4, 2004, except Saturday, Sunday or holidays at the following locations. Kerhonkson Elementary School - High School Marbletown Elementary School - Middle School Rosendale Elementary School - District Office NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that a Public Hearing on the Budget will be held on May 11, 2004, at 6:00 p.m. (prevailing time) at the District Office on Kyserike Road, Accord, New York, for the purpose of presenting the budget document for the school year, July 1, 2004 - June 30, 2005. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that petitions nominating candidates for the Office of Member of the Board of Education must be filed with the Clerk of the District not later than 5:00 p.m. on Monday, April 19, 2004. the term of office is for three (3) years. The following vacancies are to be filled: Term of Tavi Cilenti, expiring June 30, 2004 Term of Holly Elliott, expiring June 30, 2004 Term of Nancy Taylor, expiring June 30, 2004 Each petition shall be directed to the Clerk of the School District, shall be signed by at least 51 qualified voters of the district, shall state the residence of each signer, and shall state the name and residence of the candidate. PLEASE TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that, pursuant to the Education Law, any qualified voter of the District may vote without prior registration. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the School District shall require all persons offering to vote at the Annual School District Meeting to provide one form of proof of residency with physical address, including but not limtied to: Drivers License with physical address Non-Driver Identification Card Voter Registration Card Board of Elections Notice of Voting Location Check Book with physical address State Income Tax Form Heading with School ID #543 Automobile Insurance Policy with physical address NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that pursuant to Section 2018-b of the Education Law, applications for absentee ballots for the Annual School District Meeting may be obtained at the Office of the District Clerk, during regular office hours, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. The application must be received by the District Clerk at least seven (7) days prior to the vote if the ballot is to be mailed to the voter or the day before the vote if the ballot will be picked up personally by the voter. Written requests for absentee ballots must be made at least seven (7) days and no more than thirty (30 days prior to the vote. Absentee ballots must be received at the Office of the District Clerk by no later than 5:00 p.m., prevailing time, on the day of the vote, May 18, 2004. A list of all persons to whom absentee ballots shall have been issued will be available for inspection to qualified voters of the District at the Office of the District Clerk during regular office hours, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., prevailing time, until the day of the Election and Vote. Any qualified voter may file written challenge of the qualifications of a voter whose name appears on such list, stating the reasons for the challenge. AND NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that any proposition or question not requiring official notice in the call of the annual vote and election may be voted upon at said vote and election, providing a petition signed by at least one hundred (100) qualified voters, together with the legal residence of each, is filed with the Clerk of the District no later than thirty (30) days before the vote. Dated: March 29, 2004 BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION RONDOUT VALLEY CENTRAL SCHOOL DISTRICT By: Lorraine P. Sciarrino, District Clerk (Freeman 4/2/04)

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Town Planning Board, Zoning Board of Appeals and Board of Assessment Review
Members Failed to Take Oath of Office, Creating Vacancies


Members of the Town Board were notified that most members of the three independent decision making boards in town had not taken the oath of office required by State law within 30 days of taking office.  State Law further provides that if the oath of office is not taken and filed in writing with the Town Clerk within the 30 day period, that the positions shall be deemed vacant.  The possible